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Author Topic:   Movie History
CJSiegal
Hack Writer

Posts: 13
From:Rosarito Beach, Mexico
Registered: Apr 2000

posted March 19, 2001 04:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for CJSiegal   Click Here to Email CJSiegal     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm a big movie history buff and love little goofy stories about films. For instance, did you know that in 1943 Warner Bros.' "Casablanca" won plaster Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Screenplay? It was because of World War II rationing. So painted plaster statuettes were handed out at the ceremonies 1942-1945. After the war ended, the winners of the "temporary" awards were able to turn them in for "real" Oscars, which are cast in bronze with 24-karat gold plating.

I've got tons of little tidbits like this (especially about Manka Bros.). What are some of your favorites?

IP: 205.173.143.35

Raphael
A-List Writer

Posts: 35
From:San Diego, CA
Registered: Jun 2000

posted March 20, 2001 05:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Raphael   Click Here to Email Raphael     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Did you know that when Jennifer Beals looks to be spinning on her back in the final "Flashdance" audition, it's actually a guy. They had to get some break dancing guy to put on a Jennifer Beals wig and leotard.

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Raphael
A-List Writer

Posts: 35
From:San Diego, CA
Registered: Jun 2000

posted March 20, 2001 06:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Raphael   Click Here to Email Raphael     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
AND the shark from Jaws didn't really work or look good so they couldn't film it too much, which made it scarier, I guess.

IP: 205.173.143.35

IWorkAtTheWB
A-List Writer

Posts: 125
From:Burbank, CA
Registered: Sep 2000

posted October 04, 2002 01:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for IWorkAtTheWB   Click Here to Email IWorkAtTheWB     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The first “talking picture” - Warner Bros.’ “The Jazz Singer” premiered at the Warner Theater in New York 75 years ago. On October 6, 1927 a sold-out audience heard Al Jolson say “Wait a minute…wait a minute. You ain’t heard nothin’ yet!” The first words ever uttered on a movie screen.

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NEWSFLASH
A-List Writer

Posts: 7462
From:Hollywood, CA
Registered: Apr 2002

posted May 09, 2003 08:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Two new films document filmmaking in the 1970s.
http://www.msnbc.com/news/911035.asp?0cv=CB20

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NEWSFLASH WINTER INTERN
A-List Writer

Posts: 400
From:
Registered: Dec 2006

posted February 01, 2007 09:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH WINTER INTERN   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH WINTER INTERN     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Stars Line Up To Take Part in Brando Documentary


Late, great movie icon Marlon Brando is to be honored by his friends and peers as part of a new two-part documentary to air on TV in America in May. James Caan, Al Pacino, Martin Scorsese, Angie Dickinson, Edward Norton and Dennis Hopper will join family and friends to reminisce and pay tribute to the On The Waterfront star in Brando. The revealing documentary will also feature never-before-seen footage of Brando at work and play, and a series of rarely-seen in-depth interviews with the actor. It will also look at Brando's involvement in civil rights and features interviews with Native American leaders and Black Panther officials, who the movie legend worked with and befriended. But the real highlight of the documentary, which will air on the Turner Classic Movies network on May 1 and 2, will be an interview with Sacheen Littlefeather, the Native American actress who took the stage at the 1973 Academy Awards to reject Brando's Oscar for The Godfather.

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1
A-List Writer

Posts: 46
From:Oneworld
Registered: Jul 2005

posted March 06, 2007 10:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for 1   Click Here to Email 1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I love hearing stories about The Films That Almost Were, although they make me sad because I then want to see the films and can't. Sometimes I hope that when I die, I'll get access to a celestial movie theater that will play all the movies that almost got made but fell through, along with alternate versions of released films but with the originally planned cast or script. I'm looking forward to finally seeing Peter Sellers in Kiss Me, Stupid and Paulette Goddard in Gone with the Wind, but as much as I like Steve McQueen, I'm not sure I'll enjoy him in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. And I can't wait to see Orson Welles' cut of The Magnificent Ambersons. An entire book has been devoted to movies that we'll never see, Chris Gore's The 50 Greatest Movies Never Made, although I've never had a chance to read it. Here's a list of seven notorious almost-made films that I know about. If I missed anything good, let me know.

Don Quixote -- This is probably the most well-known example of a movie we'll never see. Orson Welles worked on and off to film a version of Don Quixote for 30 years. He took acting roles he didn't particularly like to finance the film, but kept running out of money and the film was nowhere near complete when he died.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote -- At least we know the story behind this unfinished Terry Gilliam film and can see tantalizing clips (as in the above photo), thanks to the documentary Lost in La Mancha. However, seeing Johnny Depp in some of those clips makes me even more frustrated that the film was never completed. Gilliam still has plans to buy back the footage from the insurance company and finish the film, so it's not entirely a lost cause.

The Marx Brothers at the U.N. -- In the early 1960s, Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond plotted a Marx Brothers movie set at the United Nations. The three brothers had not made a movie together in over a decade, and were getting up there in age, but liked the idea. Unfortunately, before the project could go anywhere, Harpo had a heart attack and no one would insure the film. I could see this being a glorious flop, but we'll never know for sure. [Source: Wilder Times by Kevin Lally]

Roger Rabbit 2 -- Rich Drees has a good explanatory article on why we never saw a sequel to Who Framed Roger Rabbit, even though a script was written and preproduction tests were run. The short version: Too pricey. Considering some of the very expensive flops we've seen released in the past few years, this seems like a real shame.

Up Against It -- In 1967, British playwright Joe Orton wrote a script for a Beatles movie that was considered too racy and subversive for the Fab Four. According to John Lahr's bio of Orton, Prick Up Your Ears, Orton boasted that the script included the Beatles "involved in dubious political activity, dressed as women, committed murder, been put in prison and committed adultery. And the script isn't finished yet." I'm very fond of Orton's plays (Loot, What the Butler Saw) and can only imagine what the combination of Orton and The Beatles would have spawned.

A Confederacy of Dunces -- I grew up in New Orleans, the setting for A Confederacy of Dunces, and I feel like I've been hearing about potential movies adapted from John Kennedy Toole's novel for most of my life. John Belushi, Chris Farley, Will Ferrell -- who will they think of next to play Ignatius Reilly? Many articles have been written about the multiple attempts to make this movie -- there's a whole other novel or documentary in there somewhere. The older I get, the more I believe that the spirit of the novel is unfilmable to begin with, so I kind of hope we never see a movie version. (I would have liked hearing the staged reading in 2003, though.)

Flamingos Forever -- John Waters wrote a script and was in negotiations to make a sequel to his cult film Pink Flamingos, but Divine and Edith Massey died before the movie could be shot. Waters understandably has no intention of making the movie with anyone else. This is probably the movie I'm least sorry to have missed of all the ones on this list; I'm not all that crazy about Pink Flamingos myself and the sequel's biggest attraction to many was its punchline: a reversal of the last scene in the original.

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indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8459
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted September 08, 2008 08:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Silent Screen Siren Page Dies

7 September 2008 4:02 PM, PDT

Silent movie star Anita Page has died at the age of 98.

The veteran actress passed away in her sleep at her Los Angeles home on Saturday morning.

Page - real name Anita Pomares - broke into Hollywood in 1928, at the age of 18, when she landed a role alongside Joan Crawford in Our Dancing Daughters.

She went on to win a role in the musical The Broadway Melody in 1929, and the film became the first spoken word movie to win an Academy Award in 1930 for Best Picture.

Page wed her first husband, The Broadway Melody composer Nacio Herb Brown, in 1934, but the union was annulled the following year.

In 1936, she married second husband Herschel House, six weeks after they met, and took a near 30-year break from acting to became a doting housewife to the U.S. Navy officer.

But she returned to the limelight in 1994, three years after House's death, with a part in thriller Sunset After Dark.

Throughout her career, Page starred alongside the likes of Lon Chaney, Walter Huston, Clark Gable and silent film legend Buster Keaton, with whom she appeared in 1930's Free and Easy, and 1931's Sidewalks of New York.

Her last film appearance came in Frankenstein Rising, a horror due for release later this year.

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indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8459
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted June 09, 2009 09:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Pretty Woman Voted Top Movie Scene

9 June 2009 9:05 AM, PDT

A scene from Julia Roberts' classic film Pretty Woman has been voted Britain's favourite movie moment of all time.

The 1990 picture won Roberts a Golden Globe award and an Oscar nomination and now the classic scene has seen off competition from other films to top the survey by the Turner Classic Movies Channel.

Movie fans voted Roberts into first place for the moment her prostitute character, Vivienne, confronts a shop assistant in a luxury store, after the woman previously refused to serve her.

In second place was Meg Ryan in 1989's When Harry Met Sally, which saw the actress fake an orgasm in the middle of a busy New York deli.

Jack Nicholson chopping down a door with an axe and screaming "Here's Johnny!" in 1980's The Shining came in third, while Arnold Schwarzenegger's famous "I'll be back" line in The Terminator polled at number four.

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fred
A-List Writer

Posts: 8234
From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted March 29, 2010 09:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In Movies, to Err Is Human, to Nitpick Is Even More So
A Committed Cadre of Carpers Catches Flubs in Flicks; Rikki Rosen's Watching

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By BARRY NEWMAN

ST. LOUIS—Johnny Depp's fingernails are dirty when he gets drunk on rum and passes out in the movie "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl." When he wakes up and brings his hands to his face, the fingernails are clean.

Rikki Rosen caught that. She reported it to a Web site in Britain called Movie Mistakes, which does nothing but list mistakes in movies. While Mr. Depp inspects his pirate crew, the sun shines from different directions between cuts. Ms. Rosen also caught that mistake. When Mr. Depp bites into an apple, the bite mark changes shape from shot to shot. Ms. Rosen caught that one, too.
[SCRIPT]

Barrel from 'Jaws"

In all, she has reported 293 mistakes in the pirate movie to Movie Mistakes. She has also reported 3,695 mistakes in 181 other movies—including the bit in "War of the Worlds" when Tom Cruise yells "We're under attack!" and it's obvious that the inspection sticker previously on his van's windshield is no longer there.

Ms. Rosen is a 48-year-old with red hair and a bad cold. Her inner-suburban living room contains couches and cat baskets; an old Sony television with an Xbox under it; tea cups, a computer and stacks of DVDs. At last count, she was Movie Mistake's No. 2 contributor, behind someone called "Hamster" with 4,413.

"Sure, a movie can have mistakes," she said, curled up on her couch one morning. "People are imperfect. But sometimes it's just one after the other after the other. It smacks of not caring. These things should not be blatant on the screen." Ms. Rosen suppressed a cough. "So I look," she said. "I look at everything."

All movie sets have nitpickers. They were "script girls," early on. Now they're "script supervisors."

They ward off wobbles that make movies less believable. But the Internet has stirred up a nest of similarly obsessed volunteers. They nitpick the nitpickers.

Jon Sandys, 31, founder of Movie Mistakes, posted a few gems on the Web in 1996 and asked people to send more. Now he lists 85,000, among them the Cessna in "Terminator 3" marked "N3035C" on the ground and "N3973F" in the air.

At IMDb, his huge rival, "goofs" rank in the top pages viewed by 57 million monthly visitors. "It's smart people making connections," says Keith Simanton, the site's editor.

Clicking the names of script supervisors leads to lists of every mistake reported for every movie they've ever worked on. "They think they see things nobody else sees—it makes them feel clever," says Sharon Watt, 32, a script supervisor in New York. "I can explain every one of my mistakes."

Like this one: In "Precious," a 2010 Oscar winner, Gabourey Sidibe steals some fried chicken and runs from a restaurant leaving her notebook behind. In the next scene, she has a notebook again.

In the script, someone gives her a new notebook. The moment was filmed exactly in keeping with the script. "We shot it," says Ms. Watt. But disharmony arose in the production. Ms. Watt left. Three script supervisors succeeded her. In the final cut, the moment when Precious gets a new notebook is gone.

"The one person you don't want to change on a shoot is the script supervisor," Ms. Watt says. "A movie is like a jigsaw puzzle, and you're the only one who has the cover of the box."

Script supervisors keep thick logs of props, locations and costumes. Scenes aren't shot in order. A bruise might have to look old in the morning and fresh in the afternoon. Actors ought to sync the same words with the same actions in each take. The idea is to give an editor film that can be spliced into a coherent whole.

Yet when a collar button is missing in an actor's finest performance, an editor will usually forget the button and go for the performance.

"We're not assuming that people who watch DVDs will keep going back and forth and back and forth and back and forth," says Michael Taylor, a New York script supervisor turned editor.

Mr. Taylor hasn't met Rikki Rosen—who was in her living room, feeding "Jaws" into her Xbox. The credits fade to a close up of a boy at a beach party. Behind him is a guy in a long-sleeve shirt. In the next shot, the sleeves are short.

Ms. Rosen hit the pause button and said, "See!"

"Jaws" was scarily flawless when she saw it as a teenager in Brooklyn. "I didn't go swimming all summer," Ms. Rosen says. Eleven years ago, she moved to St. Louis, where her husband is a salesman and she illustrates school materials. Her three growing sons watched a "Jaws" DVD over and over, and so did she.

The more she watched, the more mistakes jumped out—156 to be exact—and the worst of them are those yellow barrels the shark yanks off Quint's boat in the final petrifying sequence:

"Look—two barrels on deck," Ms. Rosen said, stopping the action and starting it again. "But here—three. Now two on the boat, three in water. Three on the boat, two in the water."

The more mistakes she saw, the less scary "Jaws" became. Ms. Rosen calls that realization "cathartic." When she isn't watching horror movies, Ms. Rosen tries to keep her disbelief suspended. But sloppy moviemakers, in her opinion, won't let her.

"Certain people have to do a better job," she said, sipping tea. "One of my sons said to me, 'Ma, you should be one of these people. You have this eye.' "

To prove it, she teed up "Some Like It Hot," the all-time-great comedy with 51 IMDb goofs. Ms. Rosen had seen it once, years ago.

Instantly, she caught the broken (then unbroken) hearse window and the oddly leaky coffin. She got the rearranged beach chairs, and Marilyn Monroe's disappearing bra strap.

But when the girls in the band run across the sand for a swim, Ms. Rosen missed the mountainous backdrop, which reveals that the movie was shot in California, not Florida. "I wasn't looking," she said, letting out a laugh. "I got carried away with the story."

Well, nobody's perfect.

IP: 24.205.72.20

HollywoodProducer
A-List Writer

Posts: 2807
From:La Canada
Registered: Jun 2000

posted April 15, 2010 10:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Christopher Plummer to Narrate TCM's Seven-Part Series MOGULS AND MOVIE STARS: A HISTORY OF HOLLYWOOD

ATLANTA, April 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Two-time Emmy® winner and 2009 Academy Award® nominee Christopher Plummer (The Last Station) will narrate Turner Classic Movies' (TCM) ambitious, seven-part original production MOGULS AND MOVIE STARS: A HISTORY OF HOLLYWOOD. This comprehensive true story behind the making of the American movie industry is being co-produced by TCM and Bill Haber's Ostar Productions. The series is slated to premiere in November 2010.

"It is an honor for us to welcome Christopher Plummer to TCM's largest and most important original production to date," said Michael Wright, executive vice president, head of programming for TCM, TNT and TBS. "His distinctive and elegant voice will be the perfect guide through the extraordinary history of American film."

The true story of the American film industry has as many ups and downs, twists and turns as the latest big-budget thriller, not to mention a cast of characters worthy of a shelf full of Oscars®. MOGULS AND MOVIE STARS: A HISTORY OF HOLLYWOOD will tell this extraordinary tale over the course of seven one-hour documentaries, each focusing on a different era of American movie history. Spanning from the invention of the first moving pictures to the revolutionary, cutting-edge films of the 1960s, this production will feature rarely seen photographs and film footage, clips from memorable American movies and interviews with distinguished historians and major Hollywood figures.

At its heart, the documentary series will be a personal history of Hollywood, detailing the personalities, inter-personal relationships, collaborations and conflicts that created an industry and an art form. The series will also serve as a history of America, looking at how moviemakers responded to such major events as the Great Depression, World War II and the Civil Rights movement.

MOGULS AND MOVIE STARS: A HISTORY OF HOLLYWOOD is executive-produced by Bill Haber (TNT's Nightmares & Dreamscapes: From the Stories of Stephen King; Broadway's The History Boys and Monty Python's Spamalot). It is being directed, written and produced by four-time Emmy nominee Jon Wilkman.

As a special sneak preview, TCM will screen a rough cut of the first episode of MOGULS AND MOVIE STARS, at the TCM Classic Film Festival next week in Hollywood. The screening, set for Friday, April 23, at 1:15 p.m. at the Egyptian Theatre, will include a panel discussion with Michael Wright, Bill Haber, Jon Wilkman as well as Tom Brown, vice president of original productions for TCM.

Christopher Plummer scored a career triumph last year in his Oscar-nominated performance as Leo Tolstoy in The Last Station, with Helen Mirren. He also provided voices for the hit animated films Up and 9 and starred with the late Heath Ledger in Terry Gilliam's The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus. Plummer recently completed shooting for the drama Beginners, with Ewan McGregor, and the comic book adaptation Priest, with Paul Bettany, both of which are set for release next year.

Since director Sidney Lumet introduced Plummer to the screen in Stage Struck (1957), Plummer has appeared in a host of films, including the Oscar-winning The Sound of Music (1965), The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964), Inside Daisy Clover (1965), Oedipus the King (1968), The Battle of Britain (1969), The Man Who Would Be King (1975), Return of the Pink Panther (1975), The Silent Partner (1978), Murder by Decree (1979), Eyewitness (1981), Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991), Malcolm X (1992), Wolf (1994), Delores Claiborne (1995), Twelve Monkeys (1995), The Insider (1999), A Beautiful Mind (2001), Ararat (2002), Cold Creek Manor (2003), Syriana (2005) and Inside Man (2006).

Plummer's numerous narration credits include The Making of a Legend: Gone with the Wind (1988), which premiered on TNT when that network first launched. He also provided narration for The First Emperor of China (1989) and Lost Over Burma: Search for Closure (1997).

A Canadian from Montreal, Plummer made his professional debut on stage and radio in both French and English. Since his New York debut in 1954, Plummer has starred in many prestigious Broadway productions, including his Tony-winning performances in Cyrano (1973) and Barrymore (1997). In 2004, he scored his sixth Tony nomination for his performance in the title role of King Lear at Lincoln Center. He garnered a seventh nomination in 2007 for his work in Inherit the Wind.

Plummer has been a leading actor at Great Britain's National Theatre under Sir Laurence Olivier, the Royal Shakespeare Company under Sir Peter Hall and, in its formative years, the Stratford Festival of Canada under Sir Tyrone Guthrie and his mentor, Michael Langham.

Plummer's many honors include Great Britain's Evening Standard Award, plus one nomination; two Emmys, plus six nominations; a Genie Award for Murder by Decree and Genie nominations for The Amateur (1981), Impolite (1992) and Blizzard (2003). In 1968, sanctioned by Queen Elizabeth II, he was made a Companion of the Order of Canada, the equivalent of an Honorary Knighthood. He also received the Governor General's Life Achievement Award, an Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts from New York's Julliard School and additional honorary doctorates from five major Canadian universities. Plummer was elected into the Theatre's Hall of Fame in 1986 and joined Canada's Walk of Fame in 1999.

Turner Classic Movies is a Peabody Award-winning network that presents great films, uncut and commercial-free, from the largest film libraries in the world. Currently seen in more than 80 million homes, TCM features the insights of veteran primetime host Robert Osborne and weekend daytime host Ben Mankiewicz, plus interviews with a wide range of special guests. As the foremost authority in classic films, TCM offers critically acclaimed original documentaries and specials, along with regular programming events that include The Essentials, 31 Days of Oscar and Summer Under the Stars. TCM also stages special events and screenings, such as the upcoming TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood; produces a wide range of media about classic film, including books and DVDs; and hosts a wealth of materials at its Web site, www.tcm.com. TCM is part of Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., a Time Warner company.

Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., a Time Warner company, creates and programs branded news, entertainment, animation and young adult media environments on television and other platforms for consumers around the world.

IP: 205.188.116.141

RobinRafe
Director

Posts: 396
From:Sherman Oaks, CA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted July 29, 2010 10:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for RobinRafe   Click Here to Email RobinRafe     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Very excited about TCM's upcoming History of Hollywood series. Really interested to see how Manka Bros. is portrayed - especially during the war years.

IP: 64.236.243.16

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 882
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted March 29, 2012 03:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Beverly Hills, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has acquired more than 70,000 photographs from the Bison Archives, the private collection of renowned film historian Marc Wanamaker, Academy COO Ric Robertson announced today. The images document nearly every facet of film production between 1909 and the present day, focusing on the first half of the 20th century. Many of these images are the only known photographs of their subjects, including a group of eight behind-the-scenes color images of the filming of the opening sequence of Orson Welles’s 1958 noir classic, “Touch of Evil.”


“Marc’s dedication to preserving a historic photographic record of our industry has resulted in an extraordinary collection,” said Robertson. “We’re honored to add these images to our to our library’s holdings. His photographs, so many of which focus on behind-the-scenes studio activities, combined with the existing Herrick photographs, will provide unequalled coverage on all aspects of Hollywood filmmaking.”

Bison Archives was named in tribute to the Bison Company, an early motion picture studio (formed in 1909) that produced Westerns featuring Native American casts.

Adding to the more than 10 million photographs in the holdings of the Academy’s Margaret Herrick Library, the collection features rare images from more than 100 major and independent studios, many of which ceased to exist past the 1920s, including Biograph, Edison, E & R Jungle Film Co., Essanay and Vitagraph.

“I felt very strongly that the collection should be with the Academy,” said Cecilia DeMille Presley, who helped the Academy acquire the Bison photographs on behalf of the Cecil B. DeMille Foundation.

Other highlights from the collection include vintage set and location photographs of such legendary directors as D.W. Griffith, John Ford, Alfred Hitchcock, Billy Wilder, Stanley Kubrick and Steven Spielberg, as well as many of their below-the-line contemporaries, including film editor Anne Bauchens, cinematographer Billy Bitzer, art director Ben Carré and costume designer Gwen Wakeling.

Wanamaker began amassing the collection in 1971, as he was researching a book on the history of the American motion picture studios. Over the years, the collection has been used by authors, historians and filmmakers from all over the world for hundreds of books, films, lectures, exhibitions, publications and other scholarly works. “The Herrick is one of the premier archives in the world,” said Wanamaker. “It is appropriate that much of my life’s work will have a permanent home there, including a photo album compiled by Ralph DeLacy, D.W. Griffith’s property master for “Intolerance.”

The photographs in the Herrick Library are preserved and cataloged, and made accessible to filmmakers, historians, students and the public.

IP: 168.161.192.16

fred
A-List Writer

Posts: 8234
From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted September 04, 2013 02:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is a great history of Francis Coppola's "One From The Heart" from my friends at Vice.
http://www.vice.com/read/coppola-gets-dickslapped

IP: 168.161.192.15

HollywoodProducer
A-List Writer

Posts: 2807
From:La Canada
Registered: Jun 2000

posted December 18, 2013 04:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Movie-Theater Chains Take On IMAX; Rival Movie Chains Invest in Oversize Screens, Enhanced Sound, Luxury Seats

A battle for the bigger screen is brewing between IMAX Corp. and U.S. movie-theater chains. Over the past four years, North America's five major theater companies have been retrofitting their auditoriums or building new ones with oversized screens that add several extra dollars to the ticket price. That is giving IMAX, the dominant player in premium movie-going, fresh competition from the very theater chains it depends on for business. The trend is coming into sharp focus for Hollywood now because in coming months the number of chain-operated large-format screens is on pace to equal all 339 IMAX locations in the U.S. All these screens usually stretch floor to ceiling in auditoriums with enhanced sound and extra-cushy seats, offering what some moviegoers consider the best viewing experience for Hollywood's biggest blockbusters. Of the $161.1 million grossed last month during the opening weekend of "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire" from Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., about $9.6 million was collected from private-label screens run by the theaters. That was only about $3 million less than domestic IMAX locations generated. This weekend, "The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" from Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Bros. will premiere on virtually all of the country's so-called premium large format, or PLF, screens—IMAX and private label alike. Studios and exhibitors stand to gain millions of dollars by cutting IMAX out of the box-office equation. Ontario-based IMAX gets fees from theaters and studios that amount to about a third of the box-office receipts collected from theaters using its technology. Exhibitors typically hand over about 20% and studios pitch in 12.5% of the ticket price, excluding taxes. Some older contracts even allocate a portion of concession-stand sales to IMAX. WSJ: http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304202204579254453051597642

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