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Author Topic:   2009/2010 Television Season
HollywoodProducer
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posted March 04, 2009 09:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message
CBS Planning Fewer New Shows For 2009
Les Moonves, chief executive of CBS Corp. (CBS), said Tuesday the broadcaster will launch fewer new shows in the upcoming pilot season in an effort to cut costs. "We have very few spots for new shows," said Moonves at an investor conference in Florida. "We'll have only three or four new shows on the schedule." CBS is muddling through an advertising slowdown, along with secular threats to its traditional broadcast business model, but its prime-time lineup is a ratings leader among major networks.

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HollywoodProducer
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posted March 04, 2009 05:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message
Broadcast Networks Cut Back On Developing New TV Shows (Dow Jones)
Broadcast television networks are cutting back on developing new shows because of the dramatic slowdown in the ad market, fewer viewers and the after-effects of last year's Hollywood writers' strike. The cutbacks come as the national networks struggle to retain their historic position of strength in the mass media market and better manage costs amid the rise of cable networks and digital technologies. Because of the rising financial pressures, the major networks - CBS, Fox, ABC and NBC - increasingly are re-examining their business models and experimenting with different, cheaper programming, while trying to maintain their ability to attract large amounts of viewers. Broadcasters have always been the networks of choice for national advertisers, and so they were able to charge the highest rates for ads," said Alan Gould, analyst with Natixis Bleichroeder. "If networks lose that reach and lose that prominence, then they will no longer be able to charge a premium and that would be a big blow." The networks, for years, have been losing viewers to cable, which surpassed broadcast TV in total audience earlier this decade. Broadcasters also are battling technology that allows viewers to watch shows when they want and in a way that weakens the network's ability to seek higher advertising rates. More troublesome for the networks is that in the current advertising market, even well-viewed shows don't guarantee financial returns. CBS Corp. (CBS) leads the broadcast networks so far this season with an average nightly audience of 11.78 million viewers, according to Nielsen, but still posted a 40% drop in fourth-quarter operating income from its television division. To help manage costs, and as a reflection of its already popular programming lineup, CBS is pulling back on new show development. Chief Executive Les Moonves told investors Tuesday that the network needs only three or four new shows for the upcoming season; as a result, it will cut costs by doing about six fewer pilots. "At the same time, development is our life blood, so we are going to make sure we have plenty in the pipeline," Moonves said. Typically, networks receive pitches and commission scripts in the fall and winter to begin development on between 15 and 25 pilot shows to test before the upfront advertising sales gatherings in the spring, where major advertisers lock in deals for the new prime-time season. Historically, only about a quarter of the network pilot shows in development have been made into a series. "Pilots have tended to be very expensive gambles," Miller Tabak analyst David Joyce said. "Prime-time shows have been an important part of the broadcast business model, but drastic times call for drastic measures." Matt Cherniss, executive vice president of programming for Fox Broadcasting, said his network moved away from that schedule during last year's writer's strike to a year-round development process. "It's been hard to break out of old habits, but we've adapted to the year-round schedule, which allows more flexibility," Cherniss said. "The economic downturn has made us all take a longer, harder look and do a gut check about the pilots we're making to make sure we're doing them for good reasons." He said Fox has 16 to 17 scripted comedies and dramas in development now, down from 21 shows two years ago. Fox is owned by News Corp. (NWS), which also owns Dow Jones, publisher of this newswire. NBC Universal, owned by General Electric Co. (GE), changed its show development process last year amid the strike, resulting in fewer pilots being produced. The ratings results were disappointing, however, and in January, the network installed Angela Bromstad as president, who recently said NBC wouldn't cut back on spending on development or on the number of pilots it develops. Currently, NBC has 10 scripted shows in development, in line with its reduced pilot development count from last year. The network also lightened its burden for producing scripted shows in prime time when it recently announced the move of late-night comedian Jay Leno to a Monday-through-Friday slot at 10 p.m., creating tens of millions of dollars in cost savings. A spokeswoman at Walt Disney Co.'s (DIS) ABC, known for investing heavily in pilots, said it has 24 pilots in development now, up slightly from last year, but some of the current shows in development were on hold from last year because of the strike.

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indiedan
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posted March 17, 2009 09:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message
Arnett Plans U.S. TV Return

17 March 2009 9:10 AM, PDT

Canadian actor Will Arnett is returning to the small screen in a comedy thriller - three years after ending his run in U.S. sitcom Arrested Development.

The 38-year-old actor has made guest appearances on TV shows including 30 Rock and lent his voice to several films and small screen projects since the comedy's 2006 finale.

But Arnett is eager to line-up his next recurring role, and insists he's "working" on a new pilot with the Arrested Development creator, Mitch Hurwitz, reports the New York Daily News.

Arnett says, "Mitch Hurwitz and I are developing a new show for Fox. It's a comedy thriller, a thrill a second. God, I hope people don't think it's terrible."

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a
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posted April 13, 2009 08:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for a   Click Here to Email a     Edit/Delete Message
Top-Tier Cable Networks Set to Take on Broadcast
Don't Expect a Whopping Increase Compared With '08, but Those With Ratings Traction Could See Gains

By Brian Steinberg

Published: April 13, 2009

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- There's little reason to smile during these troubled financial times, but certain cable programmers might soon show their pearly whites.

It's been a grim parade of ratings and circulation declines and cuts in production costs at print and broadcast properties. Top-tier cable outlets, however, are poised to do relatively well in this year's upfront TV market negotiations, which many buyers suggest will be onerous and protracted.

Cable
"What I'm hearing is cable is definitely going to be better than broadcast. They've been stronger throughout this recession and from the media buyers I've heard their clients are more interested in the cable networks," said Marci Ryvicker, a media analyst at Wachovia Capital Markets. Ad commitments for cable ad time sold during last year's upfront -- when networks sell a large portion of their ad inventory for the coming season -- were estimated at $7.5 billion, a 10% to 15% increase from 2007's $6.9 billion.

Mind you, cable isn't necessarily due for a whopping increase. Buyers suggest top-tier cable networks -- those that produce original programming that have gained ratings traction -- could see just a few percentage ticks upward in the cost of reaching 1,000 viewers, or CPM, a common measure of ad time during the upfront market. What happens to overall dollar volume is another matter altogether. In a time when marketers are holding on to their dollars ever more tightly, however, such a forecast is cause for tepid optimism for cable.

Top-tier cable outlets in the upfront "will be able to hold CPMs, or maybe see just a minimal increase relative to last year," said Mary Price, principal-brand media at Dallas independent Richards Group. Others? Well, the going will be rougher. "If you're a stand-alone, third-tier network, well, I don't think I would advise my clients to go and play in the upfront market with those types of networks. This is another year where you can hold back dollars and still get some deals."

Hitting targets
What's driving the big cable consensus? For one thing, more advertisers are interested in reaching large slices of audience who flock to a particular topic -- food aficionados who watch Food Network or kids who dash to Nickelodeon.

But there's also ratings erosion. The broadcast networks continue to be the best draw for millions of consumer eyeballs in one fell swoop, and advertisers that need to reach a mass audience at particular times -- especially the fourth-quarter holiday season, when marketers will continue to need broadcast ad inventory to drive movie openings, retail sales and fast-food purchases. But fewer broadcast programs bring in the audiences of the medium's heyday, and NBC's introduction of a five-days-a-week talk show featuring Jay Leno at 10 p.m. brings broadcast's power to draw the biggest audiences even further into question.

"While overall TV viewing remains remarkably stable, the broadcast networks' share of the pie continues to shrink. Depending on the demo, all broadcast viewing for the week among adult age groups is down between 5% and 10% from last season (the declines tend to diminish as the demos age)," wrote Steve Sternberg, exec VP-audience analysis at Interpublic Group's Magna. He added: "Ad-supported cable has picked up virtually all of the defecting broadcast viewers."

All this talk prompts speculation that cable could lead upfront sales this year, something that happens rarely and hasn't happened since 2004, when Ford Motor Co., among others, started making deals with cable outlets including Viacom's MTV Networks and Time Warner's Turner channels. The diminishing gap between broadcast's share of ratings and ad dollars could give cable a chance to lead the marketplace in this year's upfront, said Steve Lanzano, chief operating officer of Havas' MPG.

Selling cable
Some cable executives have picked up on this trend and are using it in their sales pitches. In a upfront presentation for Discovery Communications' cable networks, Joseph Abruzzese, president-ad sales, pointed out that a marketer could buy time on four of his networks during prime time for the same amount it would spend on a single broadcast network.

Given the state of the economy, however, cable's ability to notch a win in this environment is not a sure thing. "The cable networks are not in as dismal a [ratings] supply situation as the broadcast networks. There's going to be a good number of cable ratings points to buy, with demand that is likely going to be lower in the upfront," said Ed Gentner, senior VP-group director at MediaVest.

But there are some positive signs in the ether. Analysts often look at second-quarter ad sales as a barometer for the health of the upfront market. The theory is that if pricing for ad time bought much closer to air date is robust, then marketers will put more money down in the upfront as they seek to lock down prices. Weak scatter pricing means marketers have less impetus to secure a cheap roost, since prices are already attractive. When it comes to scatter, "the cable networks are even to slightly up from the upfront, and broadcast is flat to slightly down," said Wachovia's Ms. Ryvicker. Whether that's a sure bet in this enervating ad economy is anyone's guess.

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indiedan
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posted May 07, 2009 02:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message
U.K.'s Channel 4 To Halt Buying U.S. Shows

In a blow to U.S. TV show producers, Britain's Channel 4 network, which once aired such U.S.-produced series as Friends and Frasier, said it has no plans to buy any new U.S. show in the coming year. Kevin Lygo, director of television for the network, told the London Times: "We will be spending nowhere near the levels we did in the past on American programming and it's unlikely we will buy a new [U.S.] show this year unless we get a good deal." The Times reported that Channel 4 plans to cut at least $90 million from its programming budget in response to an 18-percent decline in advertising.

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HollywoodProducer
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posted May 18, 2009 05:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message
Fox shifts schedule; Reality hit 'Dance' set for fall; 'Fringe' moves to Thursday (THR complete)
Fox is going for a more seamless scheduling transition from fall to midseason with the addition of an in-season edition of the summer reality hit "So You Think You Can Dance" and is making a big play on Thursdays, moving J.J. Abrams' "Fringe" to challenge some of TV's biggest shows.

"Dance" will air a two-hour performance show on Tuesdays and a results show on Wednesdays, just as "American Idol" does in the spring, thus preventing the mass displacement of series in January to make room for "Idol."

"This is an aggressive move to add women and bring stability," Fox Entertainment president Kevin Reilly said during the network's hourlong Monday presentation at New York City Center, which was full of reminders for advertisers that broadcast TV continues to be a great place to advertise.

With "Dance" going to fall, its cycle for the first time will coincide with ABC's top hoofing competition "Dancing With the Stars." In fact, if ABC doesn't blink, "Dance's" performance show will air against the "DWTS" results show (and possibly NBC's top-rated reality series, "The Biggest Loser").

Acknowledging "DWTS," Reilly stressed that "Dance" "delivers a younger and harder-to-reach audience."

The Wednesday edition of "Dance" will lead into Ryan Murphy's new musical comedy, "Glee," the only new drama to launch in the fall as Fox again is saving most of its series for midseason, when the network fires on all cylinders powered by "Idol." The clip show for "Glee," whose cast performed a musical number to Queen's "Somebody to Love" to close the presentation, scored huge applause from ad buyers.

Fox's highest-rated scripted show, "House," will remain at 8 p.m. Mondays, followed by the second season of "Lie to Me." The decision restores a strong lead-in to "Lie," which, following a launch behind "Idol," saw its ratings drop when shifted to 8 p.m. Wednesdays.

Rescued fan favorite "Dollhouse" returns on Fridays, with a lead-in from two multicamera family sitcoms: newcomer "Brothers," which didn't get many laughs from ad buyers, and utility player " 'Til Death."

"We still believe in Friday when people are home and want something fun to watch," Reilly said. "There was something missing on broadcast TV that night -- a strong family comedy hour."

"Family Guy" spinoff "The Cleveland Show," which scored a big reception from ad buyers, expectedly landed the best spot on Fox's Sunday comedy block, sandwiched between "The Simpsons" and "Family Guy." Wanda Sykes' new talk show is planned for 11 p.m. Saturdays.

In midseason, "Cleveland" will slide to 9:30 p.m. to make room for new offbeat single-camera comedy "Sons of Tucson." Reilly compared the show to Fox's hit "Malcolm in the Middle," noting the network's decision to "launch it in the same time slot where 'Malcolm' became a hit."

Two WBTV dramas, "Human Target" and "Past Life," scored post-"Idol" launching pads in midseason.

"Target," whose trailer was jampacked with stunts and explosions, is getting an extra push as the network will premiere the drama based on the DC Comic on Jan. 17, after an NFL divisional playoff game, when "Target" will be followed by the season premiere of "24."

Meanwhile, "Fringe," following a freshman season in protected slots behind "Idol" and "House," is being put to the test in the highest-profile time period on television -- 9 p.m. Thursdays -- where it might go up against ABC's "Grey's Anatomy," NBC's "The Office" and CBS' "CSI" if the other networks don't shake up their Thursday lineups.

The decision marks Fox's latest move to seize Thursdays after it started to gain traction earlier this year with "Bones" and "Hell's Kitchen."

"The door is more open on this night than it has been in a long time," Reilly said. " 'Fringe' is a real alternative to ('Grey's' and 'CSI')."

Absent from the schedule but making an appearance at Fox's presentation was Gordon Ramsay, whose "Hell's Kitchen" and "Kitchen Nightmares" have been keeping the chef on the network nearly year-round. Reilly said earlier in the day that both shows will return.

The Fox fall 2009 schedule:

Monday - 8 p.m., "House"; 9 p.m., "Lie to Me"

Tuesday - 8 p.m., "So You Think You Can Dance" (two hours)

Wednesday - 8 p.m., "So You Think You Can Dance" results show; 9 p.m., "Glee"

Thursday - 8 p.m., "Bones"; 9 p.m., "Fringe"

Friday - 8 p.m. "Brothers" (new comedy); 8:30 p.m., "Til Death"; 9 p.m., "Dollhouse"

Saturday - 8 p.m., "Cops"; 9 p.m., "America's Most Wanted"

Sunday - 7 p.m., Football OT; 8 p.m., "The Simpsons"; 8:30 p.m., "The Cleveland Show"; 9 p.m., "Family Guy"; 9:30 p.m., "American Dad"


The Fox winter 2010 schedule:

Monday - 8 p.m., "House"; 9 p.m., "24"

Tuesday - 8 p.m., "American Idol"; 9 p.m., "Past Life" (new drama)

Wednesday - 8 p.m., "American Idol" results show; 9 p.m., "Human Target" (new drama)/ "Glee" (returns in spring)

Thursday - 8 p.m., "Bones"; 9 p.m., "Fringe"

Friday - 8 p.m. "Brothers" (new comedy); 8:30 p.m., "Til Death"; 9 p.m., "Dollhouse"

Saturday - 8 p.m., "Cops"; 9 p.m., "America's Most Wanted"

Sunday - 7 p.m., Animation repeats; 7:30 p.m., "American Dad"; 8 p.m., "The Simpsons"; 8:30 p.m., "Sons of Tucson" (new comedy); 9 p.m., "Family Guy"; 9:30 p.m., "Cleveland Show"

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indiedan
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posted June 08, 2009 01:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message
Ad Buyers Balking At Paying Primetime Rates For Leno

8 June 2009 2:43 AM, PDT

Although many advertisers initially praised NBC for its decision to air a Jay Leno variety show in place of its regular 10:00 p.m. programming, citing the cost savings, they are apparently balking at paying the usual primetime rates for Leno at that time. According to projections from media buyers compiled by Advertising Age, Leno "will guarantee NBC a third-place finish" behind CBS and ABC (Fox does not air programs in the 10:00 p.m. hour). "He will do on par with what he did in late night," predicted Ann Brill at Carat advertising. AdAge quoted media buyers as saying that NBC's heady predictions for Leno's show are likely to be challenged if it tries to sell spots during Leno's show for the same price as expensive dramas airing on the other networks.

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indiedan
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posted June 24, 2009 12:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message
Where Did All The Younger Viewers Go?

24 June 2009 4:23 AM, PDT

In an unusual week that, according to the website TVbytheNumbers, saw the fewest 18-49-year-old viewers watching the broadcast networks in history, Univision’s Spanish-language telenovela Mañana Para Siempre (Forever Tomorrow) placed five episodes in the top 20 among younger viewers. A rerun of CBS’s NCIS, which drew more viewers than any other show on television, did not even land in the top 20 in the adults 18-49 demo. Among overall viewers CBS captured nine of the top 10 shows and 16 of the top 20, averaging a 4.7 rating and a 9 share. It was the only network showing an increase in viewers (9 percent) from the comparable week a year ago. Each of the other English-language broadcasters showed massive declines. NBC, which placed second for the week, was down 26 percent from last year with an average 3.1/6. Fox was down 21 percent with a 3.0/6, while ABC’s audience dropped a whopping 33 percent as it wound up with a dismal 2.4/4 for the week, to place last.

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indiedan
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posted July 23, 2009 09:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message
Summer TV shows not so hot for critics, bloggers

* Story Highlights
* Summer seen as wasteland on broadcast TV for some critics and bloggers
* Networks often run repeats and launch reality shows during summertime
* Cable stations offer destination viewing for new, hot shows
* Blogger says "you are really scraping the bottom of the barrel" for shows

By Lisa Respers France
CNN

(CNN) -- Summer offers lots of things to do outdoors, which is good for the many television viewers who complain about the quality of programming then.

It's not that there aren't things to watch.

On network television, there are plenty of repeats, reality shows and final episodes of series that have been canceled.

But summertime viewing on network television can be a wasteland, especially for bloggers and critics whose gig it is to write and report on TV, said Kath Skerry, founder and editor of the Give Me My Remote blog.

"It's borderline depressing," Skerry said. "Between the onslaught of reality television and what I call filler TV -- shows that the networks may have under contract but they just feel the need to get out regardless of the quality -- it almost feels like [the networks] have given up."

Variety, for many the bible of the entertainment industry, reported on the first four weeks of summer. It said viewership of ABC, NBC, CBS and Fox was down 9 percent, according to Nielsen.

Even more distressing for advertisers, viewership was down 15 percent in the 18-49 demographic and 18 percent in the coveted 18-34 demographic.

Skerry isn't surprised.

The most quality she said she felt she has gotten out of network television this summer has been ABC burning off the final episodes of the canceled series "Pushing Daisies," "Eli Stone" and "Dirty Sexy Money."

Otherwise, Skerry said, the great shows are happening on the cable networks.

Joe Bua blogs at IAmATVJunkie.com and counts among some of his favorite summer shows HBO's "True Blood," "Torchwood Children of Earth" on BBC America and Showtime's "Nurse Jackie."

"Nurse Jackie" and other shows such as "Mad Men" are luring viewers who want original quality programs.

Fans are even showing up in big numbers for cable reality shows such as "Jon & Kate Plus 8" (currently on a break), and the "Real Housewives" franchise.

Bill Gorman, editor of the TV rating and analysis site TvByTheNumbers.com, said the shift to cable has been a long time coming.

"It's the continuation of a trend that's been going on since the early '80s," Gorman told AfterElton.com. "Viewers continue making the 30-year shift from watching broadcast to watching cable."

Jonathan Storm, a TV critic for The Philadelphia Inquirer, said the apparent ceding of summer to cable by broadcast networks is rooted in tradition and the history of how television started.

"The car manufacturers came out with their new models in September, and the TV people said, 'We will give you new shows to advertise your cars on,' " Storm. "That was part of it and that started in the 1950s."

Storm said there is also a type of "circadian rhythm" to television in that viewers are more inclined to tune in when the days are shorter and colder.

Broadcast networks once were able to afford 39 episodes a year, he said. Now economics often dictate a 22-episode season.

Storm said networks now trot out cheaper-to-produce reality shows -- something CBS hit the jackpot with several years ago after the runaway success of the summer-debuted "Survivor."

"The networks just couldn't afford to make shows all summer long," said Storm, who will soon join his colleagues for one of their summer highlights -- The Television Critics Association's summer tour in Pasadena, California.

"Now they've found the answer," Storm said. "They make all of these ridiculous Japanese game shows -- crash yourself into the red balls, 'Wipeout' show -- and several shows that come on and vanish before most TV critics and the general public even know they are there."

Ronnie Karam, senior editor at TVgasm.com, said he has been doing what a lot of viewers do during summertime -- checking out television shows on DVD that he hadn't watched during the fall season.

"I think that putting television shows on DVD has changed the way a lot of people are watching," he said. "During the summer, you feel like you are really scraping the bottom of the barrel."

Karam said it's a chance to check out critically acclaimed shows that viewers either didn't have the time for or the inclination to watch.

Broadcast networks really haven't figured out what their strategy should be for summer programming, said Jace Lacob, the writer/editor of Televisionary.

"Years ago, you had Fox launching scripted shows early in the summer and you had shows like 'The O.C.'," Lacob said. "You used to have 'American Idol' during the summer as well, which was huge for Fox. But [networks] really haven't gotten a grasp on their summer programming, so they are offering really random shows that nobody is really particularly interested in."

Lacob said some of the offerings have been a mixed bag, such as "The Listener," which didn't exactly catch fire, and "I'm A Celebrity Get Me Out of Here," which he believes wasn't as popular with viewers as NBC had hoped.

Blogger Kath Skerry said that even the publicity push around some of the shows such as "The Listener" and "The Philanthropist," which broadcast networks have premiered during the summer, has not at all rivaled the fall season.

"The promotion around them, I feel like the lack of enthusiasm with how the networks have communicated with bloggers feels very different," she said. "Whether it's true or not, from my standpoint it feels like the networks are not very enthusiastic about the shows."

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fred
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posted September 03, 2009 11:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message
POLL: Which New Show Will You Watch?

Fall is for sweaters, colorful leaves and new TV! From singing students to political wives caught in a scandal, Hollywood is bringing out a handful of new shows this year. Which one will you watch?

Courteney Cox Arquette returns to TV with her sexy new comedy Cougar Town (ABC), which debuts Sept. 23, about a middle-aged woman trying to rediscover herself and her sexuality in the wake of a divorce.

Ashlee Simpson-Wentz and Katie Cassidy will join some familiar faces on the CW’s reincarnation of Melrose Place, debuting Sept. 8.

The Good Wife stars Julianna Margulies as a woman whose husband (played by Chris Noth) is at the center of a political sex scandal.

Technically, Glee (FOX), a musical comedy about a high school glee club, isn’t new — the pilot aired in May after the finale of American Idol — but its first season continues Sept. 9.

And on Sept. 24, the creators of Lost debut Flashforward (ABC), a mysterious show about what happens when the entire human population blacks out and sees a glimpse of the future.

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posted September 08, 2009 10:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message
TV Ratings: CBS leads slow Monday

25 minutes ago | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Fast National ratings for Monday, Sept. 7, 2009. On the final repeat-laden Monday before the start of the slow Fall Season roll-out, CBS won, but not with any real authority. Among adults 18-49, CBS averaged a 1.9 rating, beating out the 1.4 rating for NBC and Fox's 1.3 rating. ABC's 0.9 rating was fourth in the key demographic, while The CW's 0.4 rating trailed. Overall, CBS averaged an estimated 6.5 million viewers to go with a 4.2 rating/7 share, just ahead of the 4.0/7 for NBC. ABC was a distant third with a 2.8/5, nipping the 2.7/4 for Fox. The... »

- Daniel Fienberg

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indiedan
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posted September 14, 2009 11:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message
Fast National ratings for Sunday, Sept. 13, 2009.

NBC's regular season Sunday Night Football premiere, a tense showdown between the Packers and Bears, dominated the evening's ratings in all key measures.

Among adults 18-49, NBC averaged a 6.2 rating, far ahead of the NFL-aided 3.4 rating for FOX. CBS was a distant third in the key demographic, followed by the 1.3 rating for ABC and The CW's 0.5 rating.

Overall, NBC averaged an estimated 15.5 million viewers to go with a 9.4 rating/15 share. FOX was, again, a distant second with a 4.6/7. CBS' 4.0/6 and the 2.7/4 for ABC followed. The CW trailed with a 0.8/1 for the night.

FOX started the night in first with a 7.4/13 for NFL overrun (and non-football coverage on the left side of the country). CBS' "60 Minutes" was second with a 5.5/10. NBC's "Football Night in America" took third overall, beating the 3.6/6. The end of The CW's "Benny & Joon" was fifth.

NBC grabbed first at 8 p.m. with a 10.9/17 for the Chicago/Green Bay game. CBS had a 5.4/9 for "Big Brother," impacted in no small degree by NFL overrun. FOX's "King of the Hill" finale got an NFL boost and did a 3.6/6 (numbers that will probably go way down when final figures are released). ABC's "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition" was fourth, while The CW's second reairing of the "Vampire Diaries" pilot did a 0.9/1.

Sunday Night Football had an 11.7/18 for NBC in the 9 p.m. hour. CBS' "There Goes the Neighborhood" was second with a 2.8/4, nipping FOX's "Family Guy" and "American Dad" and the 2.6/4 for ABC's "Shark Tank." The CW's second "Melrose Place" pilot reairing had a 0.6/1.

NBC stayed in first at 10 p.m. with a 10.3/17. CBS' "There Goes the Neighborhood" was down in its second hour, still beating the 1.6/3 for ABC's "Defying Gravity."

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HollywoodProducer
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posted September 22, 2009 10:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message
Fast National ratings for Monday, Sept. 21, 2009

A two-hour "House" kept pace with "Dancing with the Stars" on Monday and carried FOX to a ratings win for the night. "Dancing" was off a bit from its fall premiere last year, CBS' comedies were solid, and "Heroes" -- and consequently "The Jay Leno Show" -- struggled for NBC.

FOX led the night with 16.5 million viewers and a 9.5 rating/14 share in households. ABC was a strong second with 14.8 million viewers and a 9.5/15. CBS (12 million, 7.5/12) finished third. NBC (5.9 million, 3.7/6) was a distant fourth, and The CW (2.3 million, 1.6/2) trailed.

"House" also fueled a demographic win for FOX, which posted a 6.5 rating among adults 18-49. CBS took second in the demo at 4.0, followed by ABC at 3.5. NBC averaged 2.4 and The CW 1.1.

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indiedan
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posted September 29, 2009 04:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message
Another Traumatic Night For NBC

NBC suffered another blow to its new-season lineup Monday night when its much publicized Trauma made its series debut with a fourth-place 4.3 rating and a 7 share. Perhaps of even greater concern, the Jay Leno Show, which saw its ratings nosedive last Monday night, saw them spiral farther downward this week with a 3.9 rating and a 6 share -- representing an audience that was significantly smaller than the one Leno used to average when he hosted the Tonight show. ABC won the night, mostly due to a solid two-hour edition of Dancing With the Stars. CBS placed second, thanks to strong performances by Two and a Half Men, The Big Bang Theory, and CSI: Miami.

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indiedan
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posted October 05, 2009 02:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message
Breaking: 'Bones' shuts down production

3 hours ago | EW - Ausiello Files | See recent EW.com - The Ausiello Files news »

Bones has abruptly shut down production due to a possible outbreak of swine flu, the show's creator, Hart Hanson, announced via Twitter. "First time in Bones history we are shut down from production," Hanson tweeted. "Damn swine flu! That's gonna cut into Christmas hiatus." A show spokesperson confirms that among those sidelined is leading man David Boreanaz, although it's unclear if he actually has the H1N1 bug. "David is out with the flu and the show shut down today since he was in every scene," says the rep. "We hope to resume production tomorrow."

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