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Author Topic:   2010/2011 Season
JayMcBee
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From:Redondo Beach, CA, USA
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posted May 19, 2010 06:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JayMcBee   Click Here to Email JayMcBee     Edit/Delete Message
Is almost complete.

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fred
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posted May 19, 2010 06:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message
What happened to the previous topic for this? I posted a bunch of shit in there.

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HollywoodProducer
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posted May 20, 2010 08:36 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message
CBS to Challenge NBC's Thursday Night Sitcoms

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By SAM SCHECHNER

CBS plans to create a comedy beachhead on Thursday nights, mounting a challenge to rival NBC's longtime Thursday sitcom franchise.

The CBS Corp. network announced Wednesday that it would move "Big Bang Theory," one of television's most popular sitcoms, to Thursday nights at 8 p.m. beginning in the fall. The half-hour show will be followed by a new CBS sitcom called "$#*! My Dad Says," starring William Shatner as a "politically incorrect" dad.

CBS announces it plans to establish a comedy beachhead on Thursday nights, part of a proposed fall schedule that shuffles a number of its existing hits. WSJ's Christopher Farley discusses.

The move comes just two days after NBC made a move to extend its comedy franchise on Thursday nights, adding a new romantic comedy to the night, giving it a three-hour block. NBC has aired comedies on Thursday nights for more than a decade, dating back to the time of "Friends" and "Seinfeld."

"It's risky, but it's very aggressive and it may work," said Peter Roth, president of Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Bros. Television, which makes both "Big Bang Theory" and "$#*! My Dad Says."

Moving popular series involves a high level of risk because, even with increasing use of digital-video recorders, many viewers tune in to shows in habitual time periods.

The move comes as CBS has ordered at least six new scripted series for next year, five of which it plans to air in the fall. The network said it would also shuffle other popular programs, including "CSI: New York," which goes to Fridays, and "CSI: Miami," which heads to Sundays. Meanwhile, CBS is keeping the original "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" and "The Mentalist" following its new comedy block on Thursday nights.

"We call it aggressive stability," said Kelly Kahl, the network's scheduling chief, during a presentation to unveil the schedule to reporters.

On Monday, NBC said it would put its returning comedies "Community" and "30 Rock" in the 8 p.m. hour on Thursdays. Both comedies are critically acclaimed, but so far this season both have averaged fewer than half the number of viewers between 18 and 49 years old as "Big Bang Theory," which is the most-watched comedy by that measure, according to Nielsen Co.

"I'll just say that we saw an opportunity," Mr. Kahl said after the event, when asked specifically about challenging NBC. "If we can get that block established, that gives an awful lot of options," including adding more comedies on Thursdays, he said.

An NBC spokeswoman declined to comment. General Electric Co. has agreed to sell control of the NBC network's parent, NBC Universal, to Comcast Corp., in a deal that is under regulatory review.

CBS's scheduling shake-up was announced just days after Warner Bros. announced a lucrative syndication deal that will put "Big Bang Theory" on cable network TBS—which is also owned by Time Warner—and local Fox TV stations owned by News Corp, which also owns the Wall Street Journal.

Several television executives in recent days said that sale could help spur additional syndication deals for television comedies.

Write to Sam Schechner at sam.schechner@wsj.com

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fred
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posted May 21, 2010 09:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message
Most shows look about the same as the shows that were cancelled or didn't make the schedules.

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fred
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posted June 04, 2010 09:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message
ABC, CBS Talk Tough as Upfront Negotiations Stall

ALSO READ: "Ad Buyers Balk at Turner's Bid for 13% Hikes."

While the Fox network ad sales team will be off to early dinners on Friday, having completed its upfront deals with all of the media agencies, executives at two of the other networks ABC and CBS, NBC -- are mired in debate over pricing.

While the stalemate may be broken by Friday night, it's more likely that both sides will ponder their next moves over the weekend.

Fox, which has only 12 hours of primetime ad inventory per week to sell, breezed through its negotiations and got an average of 9 percent cost-per-thousand increases on its deals. Fox, of course, won the regular season ratings race among the 18-49 age demo, and also won 18-34 and teens.

But CBS and ABC are telling the media agencies that they want at least the same average rate increases as Fox -- if not a little higher -- while the buyers are offering 7 percent. That percentage of difference might seem small, but when one agency is spending $1 billion across all the networks, 1 or 2 percent difference can amount to a huge amount of money.

CBS is posturing that it is "the most watched network," winning this past season in viewers. It was also second in the 18-49 race, and argues that if "American Idol" is taken out of the Fox ratings equation, CBS would have won the 18-49 demo for the season. And CBS procedural dramas do better in repeat than any on television on a year around basis.

ABC has a mega-viewer producing show of its own in "Dancing With the Stars" and has several solid veteran dramas, along with the most upscale younger viewers. And ABC has successfully established Wednesday nights as a new night of comedy.

The networks are also pointing to the current scatter ad market, where advertisers are paying 25 to 30 percent more than they did for commercial time bought now than they would have in last year's upfront.

The networks are saying if they don't get the pricing they want, they will hold ad inventory back.

NBC, meanwhile, is expected to tuck in behind CBS and ABC, although the network can and does negotiate using NBC Universal's cable networks, so that can impact its pricing.

The CW offers a smaller, but targeted young female audience, aged 18-34, and can often get some premium pricing because some advertisers just want to reach young females and don't want to pay for older and male viewers.

In not-for-attribution discussions with assorted network sales executives, most believe CBS and ABC will end up doing deals at an average 8 to 8.5 percent increases, just under Fox, with NBC around 5-6 percent.

But buyers, who also did not want to talk for attribution, insist that they won't budge beyond 7 percent for ABC and CBS -- and lower for NBC.

Don't expect the stalemate to last more than a few days, however, despite the tough talk. As one industry observer said, "There's just too much money out there for the buyers to hold onto for too long. Once one major agency makes a deal, you're going to see everyone go rather quickly."

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JayMcBee
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posted June 05, 2010 08:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JayMcBee   Click Here to Email JayMcBee     Edit/Delete Message
Not one word in the press (outside of Manka press) about MBS' upfront schedule.

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JayMcBee
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posted June 07, 2010 09:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for JayMcBee   Click Here to Email JayMcBee     Edit/Delete Message
Scheduling shows in the summer is the smartest thing the other networks can do.

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RobinRafe
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posted June 10, 2010 08:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for RobinRafe   Click Here to Email RobinRafe     Edit/Delete Message
Last night’s series-clinching Game 6 of the 2010 Stanley Cup Final between the Chicago Blackhawks and Philadelphia Flyers posted a 5.8/10 overnight rating, the best overnight for any Stanley Cup Final game in 36 years. The Blackhawks defeated the Flyers in overtime to give Chicago its first Stanley Cup since 1961, ending the NHL’s longest championship drought. Last night’s game was up 41% from last year’s Game 6 between the then-defending Stanley Cup champion Detroit Red Wings and the Pittsburgh Penguins.

Fox was the only other alternative for fresh programming on broadcast TV last night. (OK, I stand corrected. ABC aired a new Happy Town at 10 PM, which once again was the lowest-rated program of the night by a wide margin, drawing a 0.8 rating/2 share in adults 18-49.)

The two-hour broadcast of Fox’s So You Think You Can Dance averaged a 3.0/9 in the 18-49 demo, up +7% from last week’s Wednesday show. Beyond that, it was all repeats on the other nets, with no show able to crack a 2 rating in 18-49.

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JayMcBee
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posted June 15, 2010 09:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for JayMcBee   Click Here to Email JayMcBee     Edit/Delete Message
Reality Check: MTV Bets on Scripts

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By SAM SCHECHNER

MTV is betting tens of millions of dollars on a cache of new scripted comedies and dramas, as it looks to sustain a recent uptick in its audience after two years of quarterly declines.

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"The Hard Times of RJ Berger," top, will be followed by "Warren the Ape," below, on Mondays on MTV.
MTV1
MTV1

This week, the Viacom Inc. network is unveiling the first products of that pipeline. High-school comedy "The Hard Times of RJ Berger," made its premiere June 6 following MTV's Movie Awards. It will be joined Monday night by "Warren the Ape," a mock reality show about a celebrity puppet who is trying to claw his way back to the spotlight.

The new shows are part of a shift in resources to broaden MTV's programming slate beyond the heavy-reality TV fare for which it has become known in the last decade. About 18% of the approximately 50 potential shows MTV plans to test internally this year will be scripted or animated, up from just a handful a few years ago, the network says. MTV executives say they hope to greenlight two to four new scripted shows a year.

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Two more scripted series are being readied for late 2010 or early 2011, including a darker adaptation of the 1985 movie "Teen Wolf" that aims to harness a revival in supernatural themes. MTV has also finished shooting three other pilots for possible shows, most recently a comedy about a high-school girl who has an accident that classmates misconstrue as a suicide attempt, giving her instant notoriety.

The shows are perhaps the riskiest component of a bid to broaden MTV's programming lineup, which has only just started to see a ratings turnaround with the success this winter of "Jersey Shore" and a handful of other reality series. Maintaining that turnaround is significant for Viacom, where MTV represents an estimated 15% to 20% of cable-network revenue, according to Barclays Capital entertainment analyst Anthony DiClemente.

"The idea is that we should diversify our programming," Philippe Dauman, Viacom's chief executive, said in an interview. "If you limit yourself to one type of show, you're playing with one hand behind your back."

MTV has a checkered track-record with scripted programs in recent years. Most recently, 2009 animated comedy "DJ & the Fro" aired only one season. MTV's audience has grown accustomed to seeing reality shows rather than fictional fare on the network, and it could take time for expectations to shift, said Brian Hughes, vice president of audience analysis at Magna, a media negotiating unit of Interpublic Group of Cos.

In its premiere, "Hard Times," attracted 2.6 million viewers, close to what episodes of "Jersey Shore" averaged in its first season, according to Nielsen Co. MTV said it was the network's most-watched premiere in among its target audience of people between 12 and 34 years old since August 2008.

Scripted shows can also be costly. While MTV executives say "Hard Times of RJ Berger" and "Warren the Ape" are relatively cheap compared to their most expensive reality programs, they acknowledge future shows like "Teen Wolf" will be pricier. That show could cost close to $1 million an episode, according to people familiar with the matter.

MTV executives say they are managing costs by paring expenses on the reality side. One of MTV's most expensive shows, "The Hills," is ending its final season. Meanwhile, new reality shows that have helped boost ratings, like "Jersey Shore" and teen-mom series "16 and Pregnant" are shot in a lower-cost, documentary style.

"The less slick approach that is working as a creative standpoint also works from a business standpoint," said Tony DiSanto, MTV's president of programming. "That helped us offset some of the bigger bets on the scripted side."

Mr. DiSanto said he has moved internally for MTV to return to a broader palate of shows, including animation, comedies and dramas. He justifies the higher costs of some scripted shows with greater DVD sales and possibly a longer life if they succeed. Many buzzy reality shows ranging from MTV's "The Osbournes" to Bravo's "Queer Eye for The Straight Guy," have seen steep declines in ratings after big debuts.

"Reality shows tend to burn bright and then burn out," Mr. DiSanto said. "Scripted shows tend to have more legs."

Early this year, Mr. DiSanto hired David Janollari, who had been programming chief at Time Warner Inc.'s former WB network, to a new role in charge of scripted programs. "We have largely been seen and are perceived as a reality network," Mr. Janollari said. "The mantra going forward is diversify."

Each of the first two new programs hits a very different tone. "Hard Times" is a coming-of-age tale with a bawdy setup: the unpopular main character gains notoriety when he is glimpsed partly nude by high school classmates. Meanwhile, in "Warren the Ape," satirizes the reality-centric identity that MTV is looking to broaden. Its the title character is a poorly behaved celebrity who hopes an MTV reality show will revive his career.

"It's sort of a perfect self-mockery," said Liz Gateley, the MTV programming executive who shepherded the program. "I think MTV is at its best when we're able to make fun of ourselves."

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fred
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posted June 23, 2010 09:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message
More world cup coming!

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indiedan
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posted July 13, 2010 10:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message
Fox announces fall 2010 schedule
by Lynette Rice

Fox announced its fall schedule today, which includes a fall berth for the summer show The Good Guys and a plan to air repeats where the short-lived Wanda Sykes Show aired on Saturdays. See the full schedule after the jump.

Saturday, Sept. 11

8:00-8:30 p.m. ET/PT Cops (Season Premiere, 800th Episode)

8:30-9:00 p.m. ET/PT Cops (Encore Episode)

9:00-10:00 p.m. ET/PT America’s Most Wanted (Season Premiere)

Monday, Sept. 20

8:00-9:00 p.m. ET/PT House (Season Premiere)

9:00-10:00 p.m. ET/PT Lone Star (Series Premiere)

Tuesday, Sept. 21

8:00-9:00 p.m. ET/PT Glee (Season Premiere)

9:00-9:30 p.m. ET/PT Raising Hope (Series Premiere)

9:30-10:00 p.m. ET/PT Running Wilde (Series Premiere)

Wednesday, Sept. 22

8:00-10:00 p.m. ET/PT Hell’s Kitchen (2-Hour Season Premiere)

Thursday, Sept. 23

8:00-9:00 p.m. ET/PT Bones (Season Premiere)

9:00-10:00 p.m. ET/PT Fringe (Season Premiere)

Friday, Sept. 24

8:00-9:00 p.m. ET/PT Human Target (Season Premiere)

9:00-10:00 p.m. ET/PT The Good Guys (Fall Premiere)

Saturday, Sept. 25

8:00-8:30 p.m. ET/PT Cops (All-New Episode)

8:30-9:00 p.m. ET/PT Cops (Encore Episode)

9:00-10:00 p.m. ET/PT America’s Most Wanted (All-New Episode)

11:00 p.m.-Midnight ET/PT Lone Star (Encore Episode, Time Period Premiere)

Midnight-12:30 a.m. ET/PT Running Wilde (Encore Episode, Time Period Premiere)

Sunday, Sept. 26

8:00-8:30 p.m. ET/PT The Simpsons (Season Premiere)

8:30-9:00 p.m. ET/PT The Cleveland Show (Season Premiere)

9:00-10:00 p.m. ET/PT Family Guy (1-Hour Season Premiere)

Sunday, Oct. 3

8:00-8:30 p.m. ET/PT The Simpsons (All-New Episode)

8:30-9:00 p.m. ET/PT The Cleveland Show (All-New Episode)

9:00-9:30 p.m. ET/PT Family Guy (All-New Episode)

9:30-10:00 p.m. ET/PT American Dad (Season Premiere, 100th Episode)

Wednesday, Nov. 10

8:00-9:00 p.m. ET/PT Lie To Me (Season Premiere)

9:00-10:00 p.m. ET/PT Hell’s Kitchen (Time Period Premiere)

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fred
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posted July 25, 2010 10:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message
Finally caught up with Modern Family - I love it!

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HollywoodProducer
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posted July 30, 2010 12:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message
Former ABC Family exec Paul Lee named ABC's new entertainment president
by Lynette Rice
Categories: News, TV Biz

ABC announced today that former ABC Family President Paul Lee will become the new President of the ABC Entertainment Group, effective immediately. Lee will oversee the network’s primetime lineup and its sister company, ABC Studios. “Paul was hired six years ago because of his great creative instincts and his ability to identify an audience and develop programming that resonates with them, and those same strengths are why he was tapped for this new responsibility,” according to a statement from Disney co-chair Anne Sweeney. “Paul’s success at ABC Family is as amazing as it is indisputable, and I’m looking forward to his continued success on ABC.”

Lee joined ABC Family in 2004 and helped to turn the network around as an attractive destination for young women, thanks to programs like Kyle XY, The Secret Life of the American Teenager, Pretty Little Liars, Greek, Make It or Break It and Huge. ABC Family is in top five of all cable networks in primetime among women 18-49, women 18-34, and females 12-34.

Lee replaces Steve McPherson, who announced his decision to resign from the company earlier this week.

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JayMcBee
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posted August 02, 2010 09:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JayMcBee   Click Here to Email JayMcBee     Edit/Delete Message
Fox Delays 'Terra Nova' Until Fall 2011
by Jason Hughes

'Terra Nova'Fox's highly anticipated 'Terra Nova' finally has a premiere plan. Set to debut in the fall of 2011, the prehistoric drama will air a preview episode in May, according to Deadline. More than likely, the network will preview it after a late-season episode of 'American Idol,' assuming the ratings leader retains at least some of its power.

Fox Entertainment President Kevin Reilly said in a statement, "'Terra Nova' will be one of the most visually stimulating and dramatically grand series to air on network television. It deserves to have an equally unique launch to distinguish that the show is unlike any other."

Except for 'Glee,' apparently, which used the exact same launch strategy last year. Still, the approach worked once, so it might work again -- as long as there are no singing dinosaurs.

The ambitious project is helmed by Brannon Braga ('Star Trek: Enterprise,' 'FlashForward') and centers around a colony of people who've traveled through a doorway to prehistoric times. The Shannon family is part of the tenth expedition and the first human colony. Unfortunately, the colony is accidentally set in the midst of a group of carnivores. So far, only Jason O'Mara (US 'Life on Mars') has been cast in the lead role.

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DavidChang
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posted August 16, 2010 09:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message
Blogs move from monitors to TV and movie screens

By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times

Sometimes the next big thing comes in a small package. A 140-character package, to be precise, in the case of Justin Halpern.
For the record: An article in Sunday's Calendar section about blogs as a source of TV and film entertainment incorrectly referred to Chris von Goetz as head of the television literary department at ICM. Von Goetz is co-head of that department.
Just less than a year ago, Halpern sent out his first tweet about the harsh, often unintentionally funny, things his father said to him. A key re-tweet later (thanks to comedian Rob Corddry), the 29-year-old writer — whose biggest deal to that point had been developing a spec show for Comedy Central — was hearing from Chris von Goetz, head of the television literary department at ICM.

Goetz connected Halpern and his writing partner, Patrick Schumacker, with Max Mutchnick and David Kohan of "Will and Grace" fame, and this fall, "$#*! My Dad Says" will be one of CBS' new sitcoms, starring William Shatner as the titular assertive papa.

"It's changed my life completely," Halpern says. "It was like I'd been playing in the minor leagues and got the call to come up to the show."

Overnight success, or its near relation, is one of showbiz's hoariest clichés. But with the rise of social networking sites, blogs and Twitter, the ability to be plucked from deepest obscurity and thrust in the spotlight in record time has rarely been so within reach of Average Joe and Jane Public. Well-done blogs and Twitter feeds come with solid marketing hooks and built-in audiences plus a raft of pre-written material — all elements that have lately had Hollywood agents and producers turning away from traditional script slush piles and peering closer at the Internet.

"If you can get to the right idea before or right around that tipping point — when a site like Gizmodo or Reddit or Gawker or Daily Dish pick up on it — Hollywood and certainly publishing are realizing that you can really have something there; this person is bringing a preexisting audience to the table — fans. Then it's about translating that success online to whatever else the format becomes," says Erin Malone, a literary agent at William Morris Endeavor.

Still, even having a primed audience is no guarantee of success. Hollywood took two shots last year at developing blogs (which were published as books) into motion pictures and ended up with box-office bookends. Tucker Max's book, "I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell," grew from his Web chronicle of drinking and random sex — but the resulting film pulled in a sparse $1.4 million. Yet the film adapted in part from Julie Powell's blog and book, "Julie & Julia," pulled in $126.6 million worldwide and earned star Meryl Streep an Oscar nomination.

Somewhere in between that is Malone's client Christian Lander, who created the blog Stuff White People Like. It made it to the New York Times bestseller list as a book, but the television rights expired without being developed. While WME works on resurrecting the concept as a film, they've managed to help Lander parlay his smarts into a job as a staff writer on MTV's "Good Vibes."

"All media is looking to bloggers as sources these days," says Elisa Camahort Page, co-founder of BlogHer, a site that fosters community and increases exposure for female bloggers. "That's where their customers are now. If your customers show interest in the material, why wouldn't you fish where your fish are?"

Slowly, the entertainment industry is getting a good whiff of what is out there at ground level. Comedy Central has a site (Atom.com) that its head of original programming and development, Kent Alterman, calls a "development laboratory for short films" — and the network regularly pulls original concepts from other video websites for possible series development. Blogs are less fertile ground for the cable network, but it is developing highDEAS.com, a site Alterman describes as "a place where people put out ideas that came to them while they were under the influence."

"Good ideas come from all directions and in any form," he says. "We don't rule anything out."

Comedy, notes Alterman, is uniquely qualified to make the jump from Web to TV or film. "You can consume comedy in short form," he says. "I don't think people are going on the Web for one-hour dramas."

Of course, winnowing out the good stories from the thousands of voices and blogs on the Web is nearly as challenging as diving into that old slush pile of scripts. Most ideas still come to agents, producers and executives by referral, even at ICM, which has its own head of new media in George Ruiz.

"I'm not on YouTube combing through today's most popular videos," he says. "Someone comes to you through referral and if you spark to the material, then you tap your colleagues: 'Is this something you're excited about?' "

"Obviously, you have a big advantage if someone has already created something," says Alterman. "You're seeing so much more from that than if someone came into your office and pitched an idea."

That said, he adds, "There are some people on staff who are scouring the Internet all the time though. It's a merging of personal and business interests."

The great idea found, most blog writers become book authors before Hollywood takes a real interest. And good press doesn't hurt. A New York Times story on Powell sent her blog — a chronicle of her attempt to cook Julia Child's entire "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" in a year — into the stratosphere. Agents wanted a book, and almost simultaneously they wanted a movie.

Cooking and another major newspaper — in this case The Times — has put Ree Drummond's Pioneer Woman blog into the spotlight. Drummond's site details her life on an Oklahoma ranch after her move there from Los Angeles and features tips on home-schooling, photography, home and garden — and recipes. The last led to a cookbook called "The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Recipes From an Accidental Country Girl," and its review in The Times piqued the interest of Sony Pictures' Amy Pascal, who contacted producer Laura Ziskin.

The pair connected with Drummond and her publisher, William Morrow — which is slated to publish Drummond's memoir, "Black Heels to Tractor Wheels" (a version of which can also be found on Drummond's website), in February. Meanwhile, Ziskin and Columbia Pictures are in development on a film version, with Reese Witherspoon potentially starring.

"She's a great voice and a great character," Ziskin says of Drummond. "It's romantic, and there's conflict, and it's kind of got everything; it's a wonderful tale."

For her, finding feature ideas on the Web makes sense.

"There are different mediums from which to get ideas, and not everything out there is worth developing," says Ziskin. "But we're all hungry machines, and we need to find products and stories. Blogs are just another hunting ground — we'll take a good story where we can find it."

Another Western woman with a story to tell is Shreve Stockton, who began raising an orphaned coyote pup that landed on her Wyoming doorstep. The life and times of Charlie Coyote (and the rest of Stockton's menagerie) are detailed on her Daily Coyote blog. Stockton has had a book published based on the site, which receives around 30,000 hits per day, and says there has been "interest" from Hollywood in a feature film.

But, adds Stockton, "It's taken me a long time to be really comfortable about that. I am definitely open if the right thing came along. But it's not about me; it's about Charlie and everything he has to share."

Not every story picked up by Hollywood has a memoir aspect to it; Ruiz is working with clients who run a technology blog and would like to turn it into a TV show. A treatment and a sneak peek "sizzle reel" are making the rounds.

Then there's Heather Armstrong, who has a daily blog and website called Dooce, in which she details her life with two dogs, two kids and a supportive husband. It earns her a full-time living and about 1 million unique viewers each month. But the industry came calling for her secondary blog focus on style and design — she now has a development deal with HGTV and is producing packages for the channel's online audience.

"What this medium has done is it's given a lot of us who wouldn't have been paid attention to, whose resumes or transcripts would have been tossed aside, and given us our own platform to say, 'I have something to say and I want to see what happens if I put it out to people,'" says Armstrong.

Not every popular site on the Web works for a mass audience. Producers and agents looking to develop concepts are still looking for the same traits as they would from non-Internet-based creatives: artistry, consistency, talent and innovation. Internet content creators can sweeten the deal by coming to the table with a couple hundred thousand loyal readers.

"I want to work with people who are pushing boundaries and using new tools to tell stories in new, exciting ways," Ruiz says. "If we can help them create relationships with more traditional companies, that's what gets me excited."

Nor is the blog-to-book-to-film-or-TV model likely to stick around for long; the agencies are learning how to adapt more directly based on the individual project, Malone says.

"Now more people are recognizing that great new voices can come out of the Internet, so they're exerting more conscious, thoughtful effort into what is the next best step for this blog or Twitter feed. Sometimes, it's more than one thing," she says.

Whatever that next step is for a blogger or Twitter feed owner, no one has become independently wealthy from their one great story; it remains mostly a stepping stone to projects. Powell is the first to say she hardly got rich off "Julie & Julia" — but that success did lead to a second book and a regular writing career for her. And Halpern, who will be co-executive producing and writing "$#*! My Dad Says" with Schumacker, notes that ideas like his are likely to continue to provide fertile ground for idea-hungry networks and studios for some time to come.

"It seems like Hollywood is behind the curve with this," he says. "I see stuff that kills me every day on the Web — it's such a good breeding ground for ideas. But now that I'm here with CBS and Warner Bros., I can see all of the things they're doing to stay ahead of the curve. Nobody knows which way the Internet is going and how to get the most out of it. The thing is most people don't even know what the curve looks like."

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