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Author Topic:   Beethoven
opus_125
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From:Portland, Oregon
Registered: Apr 2000

posted January 26, 2001 11:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for opus_125   Click Here to Email opus_125     Edit/Delete Message
I had to start this. This board has gone long enough without the standard Ludwig Van Beethoven. Any thoughts? Favorite works? I'm partial to the Eroica Symphony more than #9. There is just something so perfect about that work. That's not my favorite of his, but I'll leave that until this topic starts to move.

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JohnDexter
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From:New York, NY
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posted January 26, 2001 09:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JohnDexter   Click Here to Email JohnDexter     Edit/Delete Message
Here's a recording everyone should have.

Beethoven Triple Concerto in C, Op. 56 for piano, violin and cello. Bernard Haitink conducting the London Philharmonic. Menahem Pressler (piano), Isidore Cohen (violin), Bernard Greenhouse (cello).

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opus_125
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From:Portland, Oregon
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posted February 01, 2001 02:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for opus_125   Click Here to Email opus_125     Edit/Delete Message
Have you heard the Perlman, Ma, Barenboim Triple Concerto recording with the Berlin Philharmonic? Big time star quality, big time recording... well worth a listen.

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snufflegruff
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From:London, UK
Registered: Jan 2001

posted February 01, 2001 10:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for snufflegruff   Click Here to Email snufflegruff     Edit/Delete Message
7th Symphony. Has me air-conducting every time. (Kleiber & VPO on DG).

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HollywoodProducer
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From:La Canada
Registered: Jun 2000

posted February 02, 2001 09:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message
Anyone have a favorite Beethoven conductor? I still love the Otto Preminger set from the 1950s(?) The album box set is one of the only reasons I still keep my turntable and spin wax. I just can't get rid of that set and don't even want to hear them on CD. It's a bit nostalgic for me. I also prefer to hear my old Queen albums on LP.

Other favorites are Bernstein and Masur. I'm fairly limited in my range of classical music knowledge, but I'm getting there.

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jpgordo
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From:Studio City, CA
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posted February 03, 2001 07:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jpgordo   Click Here to Email jpgordo     Edit/Delete Message
The Otto Preminger set is terrific. Didn't he do another complete set closer to the end of his life. Like Bernstein did a set in the late 80s?

However, of all of Beethoven's works, my favorites are the piano concertos. Particularly #3 and #5. The last three are so different in style from the first 2. I read that some music scholars have called the 3rd concerto the first truly romantic piano concerto written while others have said that Hummel's concertos were first. I haven't heard the Hummel works, so I can't make a judgment. I guess I'll have to now.

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JohnDexter
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From:New York, NY
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posted February 04, 2001 08:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JohnDexter   Click Here to Email JohnDexter     Edit/Delete Message
There is a great paragraph written in the notes to the George Solti set of symphonies. This quote was from one of the performers at the world premiere of the 9th Symphony - in my opinion, the greatest piece of music ever written.

"Beethoven himself conducted; that is, he stood in front of a conductor's stand and threw himself back and forth like a madman. At one moment he stretched to his full height at the next he crouched down to the floor and he flailed about with his hands and feet as though he wanted to play all the instruments and sing all the choral parts. The actual direction was in Duport's hands; we musicians followed his baton only. Beethoven was so excited that he saw nothing that was going on about him, he paid no heed whatever to the bursts of applause, which his deafness prevented him from hearing in any case."

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Schubert
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From:Leipzig, Germany
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posted February 09, 2001 04:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Schubert   Click Here to Email Schubert     Edit/Delete Message
I constantly read comments on various classical music message boards that state that Beethoven's 2nd Symphony is playful, funny, happy....positive terms like that. And I've always wanted to get feedback from any forum I can on this.

And I read other comments such as,"the cheerfulness of the 2nd symphony, which he wrote in the summer of 1802 in Heileganstadt, seems to be opposite of his sentiment around that time when he contemplated suicide and wrote the "Heilegenstadt Testimony" discussing his hearing problem.

My question is this and I have posted this before in other places: Happy symphony? Opposite of his sentiment? In the very begining of the 2nd symphony... do you not hear the lonliness and despair in that oboe? When I hear that oboe, I can visualize Beethoven at the crossroads of either ending his life vs living and becoming a musical legend.

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Zeus
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From:Houston, Texas
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posted February 13, 2001 01:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Zeus   Click Here to Email Zeus     Edit/Delete Message
I can't imagine anyone calling a symphony by Beethoven "happy". I just don't get that. Enlightening, triumphant, glorious, but "happy"... especially the 2nd.

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Zeus
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From:Houston, Texas
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posted February 13, 2001 01:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Zeus   Click Here to Email Zeus     Edit/Delete Message
I was somewhat bored with my previous Eroica version (Szell) and decided to pick up the Muti with the Philadelphia. The first movement gets off to a slow start but Muti builds the music as it goes along and by the end, it is truly an exciting and beautiful performance. The slow movement is even better with extraordinary phrasing. The last two movements, much easier to interpret IMHO, are also outstanding. But it is the quality of the playing that really got to me. Measure for measure, this is the best played Eroica I have ever heard and considering all the competition, that is something. It just seems that the Philly players took an enormous amount of pride in this recording. And the playing is not stiff or mechanical, just beautiful.

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Boris_G
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From:UK
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posted February 13, 2001 03:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Boris_G     Edit/Delete Message
Hey, Zeus, give poor Ludwig a break! Maybe it's facile to describe No. 2 as "happy", but is that true of *all* his symphonies?? I'd say happiness makes big appearances in No. 6 (Pastoral) and No. 8 - the finale of that is the height of giddy good spirits surely.

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Zeus
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From:Houston, Texas
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posted February 13, 2001 03:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Zeus   Click Here to Email Zeus     Edit/Delete Message
I don't know if can give LVB a break - not that I want to either - I like that feeling that even if he starts to lighten things up a bit a giant Monty Python foot is looming to crush us at any second. That sense of doom is what I like most about classical music.

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Boris_G
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posted February 13, 2001 04:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Boris_G     Edit/Delete Message
Sure, though I don't think LvB fits into that particular box. What's so extraordinary is that given his miserable health he was essentially an optimist. Certainly he was in no position to put his head in the clouds, even if he ever wanted to - but his music contains joy that is gained even against apparent odds - yes there's the odd looming storm cloud even in the finale of No. 8, but finally a sense that Beethoven can put this into perspective and laugh it off: and *that's* what makes his music so uplifting. Then there's Fidelio, a great opera about the promise of liberation - Beethoven doesn't undermine this by then selling the line that it's all a cruel joke. Go to Tchaikovsky's Sixth if you really want a sense of doom and the futility of happiness!

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EmilySachs
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From:Studio City, CA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted February 13, 2001 05:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for EmilySachs   Click Here to Email EmilySachs     Edit/Delete Message
Beethoven did a lot of laughing it off despite the misconception that most people have based on images and that infamous white bust of a glowering, scowling Beethoven, most think that he was a morose and angry man. But, right you are, BorisG, he was an eternal optimist and maintained it even during his darkest days. Just imagine his face as he was completely deaf, listening to the performance of his 9th Symphony. Bliss.

And talk about bleak... that IS the Tchaikovsky 6th. I went running to my wall of CDs here in the office after I read that post and popped it in... I will continue this thought in the Tchaikovsky thread...

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lousydrunk
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From:Richmond, VA
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posted February 26, 2001 08:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for lousydrunk   Click Here to Email lousydrunk     Edit/Delete Message
I love the Neville Mariner Eroica on period instruments.

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