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Author Topic:   Spotify
DavidChang
Director

Posts: 887
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted March 22, 2012 11:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Spotify’s new apps could be a big boost for labels
By Janko Roettgers

Sub Pop, Ninja Tune, Matador: Record labels used to be known as curators of a certain sound, and collectors would sometimes buy every new release on their favorite labels. The weight of an iconic label has largely disappeared in the age of digital music, but Spotify is now offering record companies another chance to prove their chops as curators. The music subscription service is launching a second batch of apps for its desktop application this week, and some of the new partners include Def Jam, Domino, Pias, Warner Music and Matador Records.

Spotify is also launching a number of other apps that make it easier to discover entire bodies of music, including one that offers an easy way to explore curated playlists from artists like Miles Davis and Bob Dylan, and one that lets listeners explore classical music by composer, era or instrument. However, the launch of label apps could be the most significant development, in part because labels seem like a natural fit for these kinds of apps.

Apps on Spotify have proven to be pretty popular. Some of the launch partners of the service’s app platform shared some first numbers with us in January, pointing to impressive engagement levels. Spotify followed up with an official tally, which showed some 15 million song plays for app partner Soundrop in February alone, and also included encouraging data from other apps.

One question not answered by these numbers was: What are third-party developers getting out of building these kinds of apps for Spotify? “Right now, there is really no monetization within the Spotify platform,” explained the company’s CEO Daniel Ek when Spotify launched the apps in November. That hasn’t changed since, and it’s unclear why startups should develop their app within Spotify’s walls, as opposed to on the open web.

Labels on the other hand can only gain from increased visibility on Spotify. Not only can they direct listeners towards the music of their artists, they can also use these apps to promote and monetize other things their artists have to offer – including limited downloads, tours and merchandise. The biggest benefit may actually go to those smaller labels that have a relationship with their artists that goes beyond music sales – which are exactly the labels that used to be known as curators of a certain sound. You know, like Sub Pop, Ninja Tune or Matador.

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DavidChang
Director

Posts: 887
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted March 29, 2012 10:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
When Spotify launched in the United States last July, it promised six months of unlimited free listening for new users. Today, nine months later, Spotify announced that it's extending its "honeymoon" for US users to an unspecified date in the future, meaning that you can continue listening to as much ad-supported Spotify as you'd like. It's a nice perk for those of you stateside — listeners in Europe are limited to just ten hours of free listening a month. The unlimited listening promotion was intended to give a new market free reign in testing out the service, and it seems to have worked — Spotify has ten million listeners and three million subscribers, evidence that word of mouth (combined with highly visible Facebook integration) might be Spotify's greatest asset. And it certainly doesn't hurt that competitors Rdio and MOG offer limited free listening per month (albeit without ads).

Update: Music Ally reports that free Spotify users in Sweden, Finland, Norway, the Netherlands and Spain can now listen to tracks more than five times each. Previously, free users could only listen to tracks five times, at which point they'd be grayed out and inaccessible. "Our agreements with the labels differ from market to market. We're working hard to bring these improvements to the entire service, so watch this space," Spotify said.

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DavidChang
Director

Posts: 887
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted March 30, 2012 11:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Streaming music-service Spotify unveiled on Friday its Facebook Timeline fan page which boasts an ongoing history of music dating back more than 1,000 years.

Although Spotify launched in 2006 — and debuted in the U.S. in summer 2011 — the company wanted to give its Facebook fans a comprehensive look at the early beginnings of music.

From Eminem and Frank Sinatra’s first album release date to the birth of German composer St. Hildegard of Bingen in 1098, Facebook users can navigate Spotify’s Facebook Timeline page to learn more about music history. In addition, the Timeline features a link within most entries to the artists’ songs on Spotify, so fans can listen to their music as they search the page.

SEE ALSO: Spotify Expands App Platform | Facebook Limits Apps that Can ‘Listen’ [VIDEO]
“We’ll be adding more and more huge historical landmarks in the coming weeks as well as keeping you up to date with the freshest and most important music moments of today,” Spotify said on Facebook.

Earlier this week, Spotify announced plans to keep the service free in the U.S. indefinitely. The company initially granted U.S. consumers access to the platform with no restrictions for six months. For those that didn’t signed up for a premium package — ranging from $4.99 to $9.99 a month — the site would be limited to 10 free hours of streaming music each month.

It’s unknown how long the streaming service will remain free in the U.S.

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DavidChang
Director

Posts: 887
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted April 24, 2012 05:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Pandora, the Internet streaming radio service, is the No. 1 radio station in Los Angeles by audience size, according to a poll released Tuesday by the Media Audit.

Pandora beat out local stations such as KIIS-FM, KNX-AM4, KROQ-FM5 and KOST-FM in the survey of 54,000 adults who were asked in the biennial phone poll, in October, what stations they had listened to in the previous week.

The research group estimated that 1.9-million people in Los Angeles listened to Pandora between September and October of 2011. The No. 2 station, KIIS-FM, garnered 1.4-million listeners in the same time frame, according to the survey.

The results dovetailed with Pandora's current efforts to launch advertising sales teams in local markets, including one this week in Los Angeles.

The Oakland-based company has come under heavy criticism from investors in recent months for not growing its advertising revenue quickly enough to make up for rising costs. In the last fiscal year Pandora paid $148.7 million — about 54% of its total revenue — in music royalties, contributing to a $16-million loss.

Ad revenue is widely seen by Wall Street as a way for the company to get ahead of its costs and turn a profit. But marketers have not paid as handsomely for Internet ads as they have for traditional media, including radio. Pandora is hoping surveys like the one from Media Audit will help persuade Madison Avenue that a listener of Internet radio is just as valuable as one who is tuning in to broadcast radio.

For now, Wall Street isn't turning up the dial on Pandora's stock. Its shares closed down 3 cents at $8.53, from an initial public offering price in June of $16 and a high of $20 in July.

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fred
A-List Writer

Posts: 8282
From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted December 03, 2013 11:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here’s How Much Money Top Musicians Are Making on Spotify

By Victor Luckerson @VLuckDec. 03, 2013Add a Comment
Spotify to Accept Subscribers to U.S. Music Service
David Paul Morris / Bloomberg via Getty Images
Spotify, the on-demand music streaming service, has been under increasing fire from musicians who say it’s hurting the record industry. Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke pulled some of his solo work from the service earlier this year and said that the streaming service hardly pays new artists. Other artists such as Aimee Mann and the Black Keys have purposefully kept new releases off of the service for fear it would cannibalize sales. Though Spotify has long said it is beneficial to artists, musicians remain skeptical.

Now the startup is making an aggressive push to prove that it can make artists money. The company has launched a new Spotify Artists page which explains its business model and how royalties are distributed in extreme detail. Spotify has paid out $500 million in royalties to rights holders so far in 2013 and $1 billion total since 2009, about 70 percent of its total revenue. These rights holders, typically music labels and publishers, then pay artists a portion of the royalties, an amount that varies depending on individual record contracts.

Spotify doesn’t pay on a “per song stream” model, exactly: the total royalty pie is split among all rights holders based on the percentage of total Spotify streams their songs garner. But the company estimates that the average song generates between $0.006 and $0.0084 per stream in royalties. This may seem like a pittance, but Spotify’s data shows that the numbers add up, at least for big artists. The company says the biggest album on the service each month typically generates more than $400,000 in royalties. A “current global star,” who Spotify chose not to disclose, generated more than $3 million in royalty payments between August 2012 and July 2013. Spotify expects these figures to increase dramatically as its revenue increases but the number of artists splitting the money remains more or less the same.

(MORE: Radiohead’s Thom Yorke Removes Music From Spotify)

Some back-of-the-napkin math using Spotify’s listenership data and these royalty figures provides a sense for how much money the hottest songs in music are making for artists and labels right now. Here are the 10 most popular songs on Spotify the week before Thanksgiving, with an estimate of how much money they’ve generated in royalties since they were released:

1. The Monster / Eminem / 35.1 million streams / $210,000 – $294,000

2. Timber / Pitbull / 32.0 million streams / $192,000 – $269,000

3. Lorde / Royals / 65.3 million streams / $392,000 – $549,000

4. OneRepublic / Counting Stars / 57.7 million streams / $346,000 – $484,000

5. Avicii / Hey Brother / 46.5 million streams / $279,000 – $391,000

6. Miley Cyrus / Wrecking Ball / 60.4 million streams / $363,000 – $508,000

7. Katy Perry / Roar / 64.6 million streams / $388,000 – $543,000

8. Avicii / Wake Me Up / 152.1 million streams / $913,000 – $1.3 million

9. Drake / Hold On, We’re Going Home /47.1 million streams / $283,000 – $396,000

10. Ellie Goulding / Burn / 53.8 million streams / $323,000 – $452,000

Note that these are the total royalty payments split between record labels, music publishers, songwriters and artists. It’s not clear exactly how much money goes to artists, but in older distribution formats, like CDs and iTunes downloads, artists often pocketed less than 10 percent of the retail price.

The picture is obviously not as rosy as these numbers would indicate for smaller acts. Spotify says a band with a “niche indie album” generated $3,300 in royalty payments in July, while a classic rock album earned $17,000.

The disclosures may help Spotify convince more acts to put their music on the service. But the company, which is not profitable, faces an ever-growing number of music streaming competitors, soon to include YouTube. Spotify may generate big dollars for artists one day, but it will have to convince a fractured listening audience that its platform is worth paying for.

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fred
A-List Writer

Posts: 8282
From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted December 18, 2013 03:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good.

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HollywoodProducer
A-List Writer

Posts: 2818
From:La Canada
Registered: Jun 2000

posted November 17, 2014 02:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Chief Defends Spotify After Snub by Pop Star

Since it arrived in the United States from Sweden in 2011, Spotify has been cast as both hero and villain in the music industry’s continuing debate over streaming music. It has been hailed as a potential savior through a two-tiered “freemium” model that would gradually lure listeners away from piracy. Yet Spotify’s royalty rates have also terrified many artists already worried that each new step in music’s digital evolution further devalues their work. This debate has taken center stage in the industry thanks to the decision by Taylor Swift to remove her entire catalog from Spotify. Calling streaming outlets like it “a grand experiment,” Ms. Swift told Yahoo in an interview last week: “I’m not willing to contribute my life’s work to an experiment that I don’t feel fairly compensates the writers, producers, artists and creators of this music.” Ms. Swift sold nearly 1.3 million copies of her latest album, “1989,” in its first week on sale, giving a talking point to critics who believe that Spotify, for all its hype, is not necessary for success. In response, Daniel Ek, Spotify’s chief executive, posted a statement on Spotify’s blog on Tuesday defending the service’s business model and updating some of its crucial statistics. Spotify has now paid $2 billion in royalties, he said, and it continues to grow quickly, with 50 million users around the world, 12.5 million of whom pay for subscriptions.

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