Manka Bros. Studios - Home
  Manka Bros. Message Boards
  Theatre
  Broadway to Hollywood -- Hollywood to Broadway (Page 1)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

UBBFriend: Email This Page to Someone!
This topic is 7 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5  6  7 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Broadway to Hollywood -- Hollywood to Broadway
NEWSFLASH
A-List Writer

Posts: 7462
From:Hollywood, CA
Registered: Apr 2002

posted July 09, 2003 11:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ben Affleck is among those attempting to acquire movie rights to Richard Greenberg's Tony Award-winning play Take Me Out, about the coming-out of a gay baseball player, the New York Post reported today (Wednesday). Affleck also hopes to play the role of Kippy, the player's (straight) best friend, he told the newspaper. "There are four characters at the center of the play," he told the Post. "I always considered Kippy the lead -- he represents the audience's point of view -- but an argument can be made for the other three as well."

IP: 64.236.243.31

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8509
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted July 17, 2003 09:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Star Turns - Gotta Have 'Em The secret of box office success for touring shows? Stars. No matter who they are. "There are, for example, fading sitcom stars, former pop teen idols from the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, or, in some cases, their extended families. When it comes to casting a touring musical in the American hinterlands or a self-dubbed world-class city like Toronto, any one of the above can headline a show and be guaranteed audience and media adoration." The Globe & Mail (Canada) 07/17/03

IP: 64.236.243.31

PegLegSmith
A-List Writer

Posts: 56
From:Boulder, Colorado
Registered: Sep 2000

posted August 06, 2003 09:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for PegLegSmith     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If I could turn one movie into a Broadway show it would be Nightmare on Elmstreet. That would be cool.

IP: 172.195.28.44

NEWSFLASH SUMMER INTERN
A-List Writer

Posts: 565
From:NY, NY
Registered: Aug 2003

posted August 26, 2003 02:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH SUMMER INTERN   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH SUMMER INTERN     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Cult Of Adapting Movies For The Stage Want to produce a hit play? Then find a cult movie that has a following and adapt it. "Don't worry too much about slickness or professionalism - your audience will be largely composed of young people who seldom go to the theatre, and never to a musical, and have no standard against which to measure performance. What they seek is authenticity, fidelity to the spirit of the cult. Deliver that, and you're well on your way to establishing a hit." The Globe & Mail (Canada) 08/26/03
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20030826/EVIL26/TPEntertainment/TopStories

IP: 64.236.243.31

MichaelMon
A-List Writer

Posts: 248
From:Riverside, CA
Registered: May 2000

posted September 25, 2003 11:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MichaelMon   Click Here to Email MichaelMon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's true. That's a good idea.

IP: 64.236.243.31

HORACEFROMHOLLYWOOD
A-List Writer

Posts: 86
From:Hollywood
Registered: Oct 2000

posted December 16, 2003 04:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HORACEFROMHOLLYWOOD   Click Here to Email HORACEFROMHOLLYWOOD     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wicked is doing incredible business despite horrible reviews. I think it's about the witches in the Wizard of Oz singing about something for some reason or another.

IP: 64.236.243.31

fred
A-List Writer

Posts: 8307
From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted January 27, 2004 02:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mystic River should be a musical.

IP: 64.236.243.31

NEWSFLASH
A-List Writer

Posts: 7462
From:Hollywood, CA
Registered: Apr 2002

posted January 30, 2004 10:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Reefer Madness, Broadway's send-up of the 1936 film of the same name, has been set for a transformation on television. Showtime announced Thursday that it will begin shooting the TV version in April, with an air date likely early next year. In an interview with today's (Friday) Hollywood Reporter, writer Kevin Murphy acknowledged that only a pay-TV channel could present the racy spoof. "We don't have the restrictions on where we can go for humor that we would have had on broadcast television," he said.

IP: 64.236.243.31

fred
A-List Writer

Posts: 8307
From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted April 06, 2004 09:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
'Simpsons' cast member gives 'More'
Yeardley Smith: 'Who ever got famous doing a cartoon?'


NEW YORK (AP) -- Yeardley Smith almost turned down the audition for a role that changed her life.

It was just so hard imagining that providing a voice for an animated kid named Lisa Simpson would lead to anything.

"Who ever got famous doing a cartoon?" Smith asks the audience in her one-woman show, "More."

Answer: Yeardley Smith.

Fifteen seasons after her agent persuaded her to do the audition, Smith is better known as the 8-year-old saxophone-playing brainiac on "The Simpsons" than for any of her real life roles. She even won an Emmy for portraying Lisa in 1992.

In the autobiographical show, Smith explains that she spent most of the past two decades dissatisfied, despite a career many actors would envy.

Between 1991 and 1994 Smith was double-booked on Fox Thursday nights, playing the virginal Louise Fitzer on "Herman's Head" following "The Simpsons." She also had a recurring role on ABC's "Dharma & Greg" as the secretary Marlene (1997-2002). In between, she showed up on episodes of "Sports Night," "Murphy Brown" and "Empty Nest."

But despite the work and the Emmy, it never seemed quite enough.

"There's part of me that feels it wasn't even a real Emmy," Smith says dismissively over lunch at a restaurant across the street from the Union Square Theatre, where she appears through April 18.

It was just a jury-awarded Emmy for a cartoon, she explains. Voiceover Emmys are considered "creative arts Emmys," which aren't voted on by the entire Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and are handed out separately from the prime-time television gala.

So Smith received her award at a ceremony a week before the "real" Emmys, then promptly hid it in the back of her bedroom closet for nine years.
Confronting her past

Onstage, she confronts this and a host of other insecurities with comedic hindsight. Wearing a glittery lavender outfit that she calls her "disco pajamas," Smith talks to a cardboard cutout of Lisa Simpson and bounces through a timeline of the ups and downs her life took in the 1980s. She even chronicles her struggles with bulimia by turning into a television game show host who instructs the audience on the finer techniques of binge and purge.

The no-longer-hidden Emmy award (her husband finally took it out of the closet and set it on the mantle) becomes a character onstage that Smith uses to confront her worst nightmare: turning into a woman who takes her Emmy to the supermarket while wearing a sash that reads, "I'm a Celebrity."

Funny thing is, Smith really took her trophy to the store one day as part of a group therapy session about confronting fear.

"The thrust of it was to accept yourself as a whole, even all the ugly parts. For me that was a very loud, sort of bragging, everybody-look-at-me person," she says. "I just couldn't let anybody know how much I wanted what I wanted."

Dressed in a tailored beige pantsuit, Smith seems much more conservative than the spunky version of herself she plays onstage. Her short brown hair is perfectly coifed and her makeup is subdued. But there's a hint of playfulness in her beaten-up black backpack with "Simpsons Mania" stitched in yellow thread.

"If I had to be associated with one character in fiction, I will always be thrilled that it was Lisa Simpson," Smith says.

Yet, she started writing "More" to get beyond Lisa. "I just got really tired of complaining that I wasn't getting enough work outside of 'The Simpsons.' It seemed that after a decade of that, it was really unattractive," she says.

"I really hoped that I would get another TV show, or a movie -- that my career would take off, and the thing would sit in a drawer. Finished or unfinished wouldn't matter," says Smith. But she finished the script first.
'She's got that earnest enthusiasm'

Smith, 39, seldom makes eye contact as she talks. It's only at the end of a thought, or when she laughs, that she turns and looks you straight in the eye.

And she laughs often.

"Like Lisa she's got that earnest enthusiasm," says "Simpsons" creator Matt Groening. "With Yeardley there's a self-awareness. She's not quite as naive as Lisa." He quickly corrects himself: "Well, Lisa's pretty world-weary for an 8-year-old."

"She's a great little girl," Smith says of her character. "Some people call her the moral compass, which sort of implies maybe that the family is amoral, but I don't believe that's true. I just think they're misguided, and trying to keep too many plates in the air. And Lisa has this uncanny ability to focus."

Smith relates to Lisa's need to break out from a family mold.

Yeardley (pronounced YARD-lee) Smith was born into a family she calls "WASPy," upper crust and reserved. Smith's father was a Washington Post correspondent whose work kept him away from his daughter. Her mother was a true "Yankee" who urged her daughter to push her feelings down deep inside. So Smith found two avenues of release: bulimia and theater.

"It would make me high," she says, describing the eating disorder that plagued her from her teenage years until just recently. "I would feel endorphins and this great sense of victory." She uses almost the same words to describe her first few times onstage. "I win!" she recalls thinking when the audience applauded.

Smith started acting at age 14 in theaters outside of Washington, D.C., where she grew up. When she didn't get into the three colleges to which she applied (Vassar College, Northwestern University and Yale University) she decided she wasn't meant for academia and moved to New York to become a star.

In the mid-1980s, she was 19 when she became the understudy for Cynthia Nixon in Tom Stoppard's "The Real Thing"; she took over the role of Debbie two months into the show. She later moved to Los Angeles to work in television and film. Her movie roles included parts in "City Slickers," in 1991, and "As Good as It Gets," in 1997.

Smith is remarkably soft-spoken. She turns her phrases gently, so that even salty language sounds refined. Still, her voice stands out from the noise of the restaurant -- it's so obviously the high-pitched voice that made her characters on "Herman's Head" and "Dharma & Greg" distinctive.

"I'm the only person on 'The Simpsons' who does just one voice because, I'm told, I always sound exactly like myself," she says in "More." Lisa's voice, Smith explains, is just her own pushed up an octave. But Smith's warm, young voice fits her pixie-ish features. Her round face could belong to a very wise 12-year-old or a very energetic 60-year-old.

Smith's subdued personality and small frame almost put "More" on a smaller stage, says producer Kevin Schon. "The backers said, 'But she's such a small person, and she seems so quiet!' "

He had Smith perform an impromptu half-rehearsed show for investors to convince them that Smith could play to an audience of almost 500. "More" is Schon's debut as a producer. Actress Judith Ivey also makes her directorial debut with the off-Broadway show.

"More" has also helped Smith deal with some of her leftover Lisa Simpson anxiety. "I've met the supreme challenge," she says. "I'm no longer an actor from the neck up."

IP: 64.236.243.31

NEWSFLASH
A-List Writer

Posts: 7462
From:Hollywood, CA
Registered: Apr 2002

posted April 27, 2004 10:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
JERRY SPRINGER -- THE OPERA COMING TO BROADWAY

The award-winning London musical Jerry Springer -- The Opera is finally set to debut in the U.S., opening first in San Francisco next spring, then moving to Broadway on Oct. 20, 2005. The show, which originally attracted attention at the 2002 Edinburgh Festival, has become a hit on London's West End. It has been endorsed by Springer himself, who, in the musical, is shot and killed by a disgruntled guest in the first act, then opens in hell in the second. Springer has been portrayed in the London production by Michael Brandon, who gives a remarkable impersonation of the talk show host. In an interview with the Associated Press on Monday, producer Jon Thoday said, "Jerry Springer is a musical that appeals to people who like musicals and people who don't. ... It's got crossover appeal. It has brought a whole new audience into the theater. And it's very funny. Aside from The Producers, there are [currently] not that many genuinely funny musicals."

IP: 64.236.243.31

NEWSFLASH
A-List Writer

Posts: 7462
From:Hollywood, CA
Registered: Apr 2002

posted June 07, 2004 09:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Lithgow Becomes a Singing Scoundrel

Actor John Lithgow is preparing to unleash his singing skills on the public after signing up to star in a stage musical adaptation of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. The show - based on the 1964 David Niven movie and its 1988 remake starring Steve Martin and Sir Michael Caine - will open in San Diego, California in September, before it transfers to Broadway, New York next year. Lithgow's move into musical theatre marks a change for the actor, who is best known for his role in TV series 3rd Rock From The Sun, and his voice work in animated movie Shrek. The show, at the Old Globe Theatre, will be directed by Jack O'Brien, who was hailed for successfully transporting The Full Monty from the big screen to stage.

IP: 64.236.243.31

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8509
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted June 11, 2004 08:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"Legally Blonde" sets sights on Broadway

She conquered Harvard and Congress, and now Elle Woods of Beverly Hills has her sights, not to mention her heels, set on the boards of Broadway. Film studio Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer on Thursday said it will produce a musical based on its hit movie "Legally Blonde" in which Elle uses her brain -- and not her blond beauty -- to beat the odds when facing adversity. Los Angeles-based MGM division, MGM on Stage, said it hired Tony award nominee Jerry Mitchell to direct and choreograph a "Legally Blonde" musical with a book from Heather Hach and music and lyrics by Larry O'Keefe and Nell Benjamin. Mitchell earned a Tony nomination for his work on "Never Gonna Dance" and his work includes hits like "Hairspray" and "The Full Monty," two other musicals that were also films. "Legally Blonde," starring Reese Witherspoon as the snappy Elle, was a surprise box office hit in summer 2001, earning $96 million at U.S. and Canadian box offices. Witherspoon reprised the role for 2003's "Legally Blonde: Red, White and Blonde," which earned $90 million at box offices for MGM. The MGM on Stage division develops theatrical shows based on movies, and currently has a version of 1968 family film "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" playing in London theaters.

IP: 64.236.243.31

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8509
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted August 11, 2004 10:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Jerry Springer Stage Show Hits Rough Times

Although initially it garnered rave reviews, played to packed houses, and seemed destined for Broadway, the London West End production of Jerry Springer: The Opera has recently been struggling to attract audiences and may not recover production costs, the New York Post reported today (Wednesday). The newspaper said that as a result Allan McKeown, the co-producer of the London show, who was due to put up half the $11-13 million for the Broadway production, has bailed out of the U.S. version. One unnamed theater producer told the Post that it was unlikely the show would ever arrive on Broadway. "It's damaged goods now," he said. "It's an open secret that it's not doing well in London. I don't think there is any chance you could get back $13 million in New York."

IP: 64.236.243.31

NEWSFLASH
A-List Writer

Posts: 7462
From:Hollywood, CA
Registered: Apr 2002

posted September 29, 2004 10:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Tax Break = Springtime for Brooks

Mel Brooks said Tuesday that New York's recently enacted Empire State Film Production Tax Credit will allow him to film his movie version of the musical The Producers in New York, where it is set. At a news conference in the newly constructed Steiner Studios at the Brooklyn Naval Yard, Brooks said, "It was breaking my heart to think we'd have to go to Bucharest, to Vancouver, to Toronto to mimic this incredible city." To be eligible for the tax credit, filmmakers must agree to spend at least 75 percent of their production budget in New York. Joining Brooks at the news conference, New York Gov. George Pataki remarked as he signed he tax credit into law, "The bottom line is that all those New York City wannabes ain't gonna be. ... We're going to be able to make movies about New York in New York." Production of the movie, which is budgeted at $45 million, is due to start in February. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who also attended the news conference, said that he will support an additional city tax credit for filmmakers. Brooks said he had another incentive for making the film in New York: "The bagels. ... You go to Toronto, they're mushy."

IP: 64.236.243.31

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8509
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted October 19, 2004 08:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mendes To Launch 'Shrek' Broadway Musical

Oscar-winning director Sam Mendes is bringing animation hit Shrek to Broadway in a musical adaptation of the Dreamworks movie. The Road To Perdition star will have creative control of the New York production, while Tony-nominated stage director Jason Moore, who took charges of puppet musical Avenue Q, will direct the show in 2006. Mendes told the New York Times newspaper, "There isn't the sort of corporate pressure being exerted that this has to be done for a set pre-release date." Moore enthuses, "'There's a supreme challenge in bringing an animated world to the stage and making it theatrical. But what's so wonderful about Shrek is that anarchic attitude placed in a fairy- tale world that I think will thrive onstage."

IP: 64.236.243.31


This topic is 7 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5  6  7 

All times are PT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | Manka Bros. Studios - Home

2015 Manka Bros. Studios - All Rights Reserved.

Powered by Infopop www.infopop.com © 2000
Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.45b