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Author Topic:   Show Closings
N F S I 2
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posted June 28, 2006 11:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for N F S I 2   Click Here to Email N F S I 2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Huge 'Rings' stage show to close
Revised version of much-panned production still on for London

TORONTO, Ontario (AP) -- The mammoth stage production of "The Lord of the Rings," which was mostly panned by critics, is closing in Toronto.

Producer Kevin Wallace said Wednesday that the $24 million, 3 1/2 hour show will close September 3.

"We're doing respectable but were not sold out. The scale of this show needs that," producer David Mirvish said at a news conference. "The costs are 50 percent more than 'The Lion King' to run so it (the theater) must be full."

It was announced last week that "The Lord of the Rings," believed to be the most expensive show ever mounted, will open in London next year -- trimmed, tightened and reworked since its Toronto premiere at the Princess of Wales Theatre in March.

The show's debut met with a harsh critical reception.

The Associated Press said it was "lavish yet disappointing ... a case of imagination overwhelmed by complexity."

The New York Times said, "Everyone and everything winds up lost in this ... adaptation of J. R. R. Tolkien's cult-inspiring trilogy of fantasy novels. That includes plot, character and the patience of most ordinary theatregoers."

The show, based on Tolkien's literary trilogy about a Hobbit named Frodo and his quest to rid Middle-earth of evil, received the financial blessing of the Ontario provincial government, which had contributed $2.5 million. Tolkien's story was adapted by Shaun McKenna and director Matthew Warchus.

Though not considered a musical by its creators, "The Lord of the Rings" has moments of song -- an odd amalgam of sounds by Bollywood master A.R. Rahman and Varttina, a Finnish folk group.

Wallace said that the stronger Canadian dollar and negative reviews made American tourists reluctant to come to Toronto to see the show. He also said that negative reviews from critics damaged the production.

The London show will have changes, he said -- they'll give it a "heightened emotional pulse."

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N F S I 2
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posted July 06, 2006 11:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for N F S I 2   Click Here to Email N F S I 2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Disney's Movie-to-Musical 'Tarzan' Fizzling on Broadway

The Walt Disney company, whose animated films Beauty and the Beast and The Lion King metamorphosed to successful stage shows on Broadway, may be about to experience its first "mega-flop" as ticket sales slow for Tarzan, the New York Post reported Wednesday. One veteran Broadway producer, who was not identified, told the newspaper, "Tarzan is not going to close today or tomorrow because the advance is big. ... But right now they're taking out more money than they're taking in, and if that doesn't change, I don't care how big the advance is, they're going to blow through it sooner or later." David Schrader, managing director of Disney Theatrical, told the newspaper that the company plans to launch a major ad campaign in August. "August is one of the highest-selling ticket months," Shrader told the Post. "People take more time to read and see what's going on, and we're going to take advantage of that."

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NEWSFLASH WINTER INTERN
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posted December 13, 2006 01:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH WINTER INTERN   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH WINTER INTERN     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
N.Y. Producers To Shut Down 'High Fidelity' After 10 Days

High Fidelity , the 2000 movie based on Nick Hornby's best seller, may have become a modest success in theaters when it was released and a cult favorite in its afterlife on DVD, but it has flopped as a Broadway musical. Producers of the $10-million production (about half the cost of the movie), said Tuesday that they will shut down the musical on Sunday, Dec. 17, just ten days after it opened to generally poor reviews and poor advance sales.

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indiedan
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posted December 14, 2006 04:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
'High Fidelity' Musical To Close After Just Ten Days


The $9.75 million Broadway musical High Fidelity will close on Sunday just one month after opening previews were staged and ten days after its official premiere. The production is based on British author Nick Hornby's best-selling book, which was adapted into the 2000 Hollywood movie High Fidelity starring John Cusack and Jack Black, and failed to garner healthy advance sales before opening to the public last week. The New York Times critic described David Lindsay-Abaire's show as one of the "all-time most forgettable musicals." Last week, New York's Imperial Theatre was half-empty for the first public performances, prompting producers to pull the plug.

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indiedan
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posted February 26, 2007 10:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
'The Producers' To End Its Broadway Run

Hit musical The Producers, which opened with stars Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick, will end its Broadway run after six years and more than 2,500 performances in April. The show, which is based on Mel Brooks' 1968 film about two producers who scam old ladies out of money to put on a flop Broadway show, has been a massive stage success - winning 12 Tony awards during its run. Brooks says, "The last six years working on this show have been pure joy for me." Brooks is now getting ready for his next show, a stage version of another of his films, Young Frankenstein.

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a
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posted December 07, 2007 10:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for a   Click Here to Email a     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A lot closed after the recent strike.

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EthanRubidoux
Director

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From:Bel Air, CA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted May 08, 2008 12:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for EthanRubidoux   Click Here to Email EthanRubidoux     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Glory Days closed after 1 performance - investors lost $2.5 million. Every show can't be Jersey Boys I suppose.

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NEWSFLASH
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posted June 02, 2008 10:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
London's Gone With The Wind To Close Early
2 June 2008 5:11 AM, PDT

A London stage production of Gone With The Wind is set to close three months early - after just 79 performances.

The show - starring former Pop Idol talent show contestant Darius Danesh - will come to an end later this month following poor reviews from theatre critics and disastrous ticket sales.

But producer Aldo Scrofani insists the West End show had been a success with its fans.

He says, "Despite the critical response, the company have enjoyed much praise from audience members during our run and for that we are grateful."

The stage adaptation of the 1936 novel will see its final curtain fall at the New London Theatre on 14 June. Bookings after that date will be refunded.

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indiedan
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posted June 19, 2008 08:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Cry Baby Closes On Broadway

18 June 2008 6:38 PM, PDT

John Waters' Broadway musical Cry-baby is closing in New York, just a week after flopping at the Tony Awards.

The show, based on the 1990 Johnny Depp-starring movie, was performed just 68 times in the Big Apple since opening in November.

It was nominated for four awards at the Tonys on Sunday, but left empty-handed.

The final performance will take place at the Marquis Theatre on Sunday.

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indiedan
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posted June 19, 2008 12:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Producers Cry Over Demise Of Cry Baby

19 June 2008 10:37 AM, PDT

John Waters' second attempt to transpose one of his quirky movies into a Broadway musical has failed. Producers of Cry Baby announced Wednesday that they plan to shut down the show on Sunday after 113 performances. The production had been unable to report a profit for any week since its opening in April. Bloomberg News indicated that the musical will likely lose its entire $10-million-plus capitalization. While personnel connected with the production said that word of mouth was positive, the show never was able to overcome dreadful reviews. Referring to Waters' earlier success with Hairspray, Bloomberg's John Simon had concluded, "Lightning does not strike twice." Ben Brantley in the New York Times dismissed it as "tasteless."

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N F S I 2
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posted July 11, 2008 12:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for N F S I 2   Click Here to Email N F S I 2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
roadway Musical Passing Strange Closes

11 July 2008 9:11 AM, PDT

Spike Lee has failed to save Broadway musical Passing Strange, it will close in New York the day after the director films it for a TV special.

Last week it was revealed the film maker would spend $2 million (GBP1 million) shooting the show, about a young black musician who travels to Europe.

The play won a Tony Award this year but has suffered poor box office sales, and it was rumoured that Lee's intervention was intended to boost the show's profile.

But producers have announced performers will take their last bow on 20 July, reports Daily Variety.

Lee's filmed version is expected to appear on a cable TV network later this year.

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fred
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posted August 20, 2008 11:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Why 'Godspell' won't be on Broadway this fall

* Story Highlights
* Growing number of shows doubtful for Broadway in recession-wary economy
* "Godspell" will not open as planned on October 23 at Ethel Barrymore Theatre
* "Brigadoon" and "Nice Work If You Can Get It" also unlikely to be seen
* Summer particularly good for long-running productions like "Chicago"

NEW YORK (AP) -- Now it's "Godspell" that is saying "no go" on Broadway.

A revival of the 1970s Stephen Schwartz flower-power musical about Jesus has announced it will not open as scheduled, the fourth production to put on hold plans for a New York run this season.

"I am devastated that, due to the loss of a major investor in the harsh reality of a slowing economy, there were no other options at this time than to postpone," Adam Epstein, "Godspell" producer, said Tuesday in a statement.

"Godspell" had been set to open October 23 at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre. The musical, reportedly budgeted at more than $4 million, joins a growing number of shows that are doubtful for Broadway engagements in a nervous, recession-wary environment.

"There are so many variables in bringing a production to Broadway -- theater availability, artists' schedules, and securing capitalization to name but a few," said Howard Sherman, executive director of the American Theatre Wing.

"It's impossible not to be cognizant of the national economy and its potential impact on the theater. But it's also premature to say whether the recent changes in plans by certain shows represent a trend, especially as we're likely to see other productions quickly step up to fill the available theaters in their stead."

The Barrymore, one of the more desirable Broadway theaters for plays, was quickly snatched by the revival of David Mamet's "Speed-The-Plow," starring Jeremy Piven, Raul Esparza and Elisabeth Moss of "Mad Men" fame. It opens there October 23 (appropriating the "Godspell" opening date, too). Previews start October 3.

And it's not the only Mamet on Broadway this fall. His "American Buffalo," starring John Leguizamo and Cedric the Entertainer, has taken the Belasco Theatre, which originally was to have housed "Speed-The-Plow." "American Buffalo," directed by Robert Falls of Chicago's Goodman Theatre, opens November 17 with previews beginning on October 31.

" 'Speed-The-Plow' is a play about glamour, sex and power and takes place in Hollywood," said its producer, Jeffrey Richards. "I think 'Speed-The-Plow' is less familiar (than 'American Buffalo') and was overshadowed by Madonna being part of (the original production)."

"American Buffalo," a robbery tale set in a Chicago junk shop, has had several New York productions, both on and off-Broadway over the years. "But both demonstrate the versatility of David Mamet as a playwright," Richards said.

Yet another play revival was not as lucky.

Ntozake Shange's "For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf," which was to have starred the Grammy-winning singer India.Arie, collapsed after losing one of its backers and canceled its September 8 opening at Circle in the Square.

Also unlikely to be seen anytime soon are two big musicals, including a revival of Lerner and Loewe's "Brigadoon." The show about a Scottish village that comes to life every 100 years was unable to find an appropriate theater. It had been scheduled for next spring. And in limbo -- at least for the moment -- is "Nice Work If You Can Get It," a new musical using old Gershwin songs and starring Harry Connick Jr. The project faltered after director-choreographer Kathleen Marshall withdrew from the show. Its producers are looking for a replacement.

Despite the glum news about upcoming shows, summer has been particularly good for long-running productions, from "The Phantom of the Opera" to "Chicago." Add to that list "Legally Blonde," buoyed by the MTV reality series that showcased its new star, Bailey Hanks, and "Xanadu," which got a box-office bounce when Whoopi Goldberg joined the cast in late July.

"The weak dollar has enabled an influx of foreign tourists and they go to see musicals," Richards said.

But what happens after most of the tourists and school children go home after Labor Day is uncertain.

"The plays that Not much comfort, though, to the folks behind "Godspell."

Said Schwartz, who wrote the score for the musical: "The cast and creative team were poised to create a terrific production and I have no doubt it will be just that when its time comes."

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MichaelMon
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posted August 25, 2008 05:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MichaelMon   Click Here to Email MichaelMon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A Chorus Line closed.

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HollywoodProducer
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posted September 07, 2008 08:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
'Rent' brings down the curtain on Broadway run

By MICHAEL KUCHWARA, AP Drama Writer1 hour, 3 minutes ago

They cheered, they cried and gave the show a standing ovation even before the first note was sung.

Broadway said goodbye Sunday to "Rent," 12 years and 5,124 performances after it first became a rock musical with a message for theatergoers of all ages.

"Like we did when we opened, we dedicate this performance to Jonathan Larson," said actor Adam Kantor, referring to the man who wrote the show's book, music and lyrics.

Then "Rent" was off and running toward its final curtain that had the last cast as well as members of its original company together on stage at the end of the evening to sing an electric version of "Seasons of Love," one of the show's best-known songs.

"There's mixed emotions, but it's time," said Allan S. Gordon, one of its producers, talking about the closing.

The show, book was born off-Broadway in triumph and tragedy. Larson died of an aortic aneurism after its final dress rehearsal in January 1996. He was 35.

"It was the most shocking thing," Gordon recalled. "I still can't believe Jonathan is dead. All you need is one (big hit), and he had that. I don't miss what he didn't write. I feel bad that he isn't here to enjoy what he did."

Larson's tale of free-spirited artists and street people in a gritty drug- and AIDS-plagued East Village of the early 1990s touched several generations.

Rave reviews propelled "Rent" to Broadway where the musical opened the following April at the Nederlander Theatre, a house often shunned by producers because it was on the wrong side of 42nd Street.

The show, inspired by Puccini's "La Boheme," found a ready-made audience in young people. Its fanatical supporters were nicknamed "Rentheads," and many of them saw the show after the musical instituted a same-day, front-row ticket price of $20. The plan proved so popular that it was changed to a lottery format to accommodate the demand.

Yet the show's fans were more than just young theatergoers.

"It's 80 percent the traditional audience," Gordon explained. "'Rent' was not defined by age. It attracted a wide spectrum of people. People of all ages love it. That's why it survived."

Survived and thrived winning Tonys, Obies and the Pulitzer Prize for drama as well as grossing more than $280 million during its Broadway run. Millions more were made from national tours and foreign productions that performed on six continents. A film version, using much of the original cast, was released in 2005.

All Broadway shows have a finite life, a beginning and, no matter how successful, an end. Even "Cats" closed, and, one day, so will "The Phantom of the Opera." But what made "Rent" stand out and be embraced by so many people?

"In my mind, it's simply the message," said Gwen Stewart, a member of the original cast and the performer who came back for the final performances.

"'Rent' speaks to people's hearts," Stewart said. "There is a universal truth that I think everyone can identity with: Living today to the fullest because you don't know if tomorrow will be promised to you. Live. Love. Laugh. We have all gone through loss. Not necessarily AIDS-related, but everyone loses someone at some point."

Rodney Hicks, another original cast member, agrees.

"'Rent' is about love and learning how to love under whatever circumstance," he said. "And learning how to accept that love. And loving unconditionally. The commonality in the show is the universal language of love that everyone can relate to. That's why the show has translated so well into other languages, into other countries."

Hicks, who first met Larson in 1995 when he was 21, had a small role in the original production and says he grew up with the show. Now he is back in the musical, in a bigger part, portraying Benjamin J. Coffin the landlord, the role originated by Taye Diggs.

"I had always wanted to play Benny," he recalled. "At the time, I looked like I was 14, 15 years old. When you are 21, you don't realize how young you actually look or are. ... Now, at 34, I'm actually old enough to play the character."

Hicks said Sunday's closing gives the Broadway production "a feeling of completeness."

But it's not the end of "Rent," according to Gordon.

Another tour starts in January for some 30 weeks with several members of the original cast. Plus a new cinecast of "Rent," filmed in High-Definition video by Sony Pictures during the musical's last performances, will be shown in movie theaters in the United States and Canada for four days (Sept. 24-25 and Sept. 27-28). Check http://www.thehotticket.net/rent for locations.

"'Rent' is recorded for history, so it's not like it's disappearing off the map," Gordon said. "Hmmm, maybe I should bring back a revival next year."

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indiedan
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posted September 25, 2008 08:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Legally Blonde Musical Axed

25 September 2008 9:09 AM, PDT

The Broadway musical Legally Blonde is closing in New York because of falling ticket sales - just months after an MTV reality TV show helped choose the show's current star.

Legally Blonde: The Search for Elle Woods helped boost the musical's box office takings over the summer, after Bailey Hanks was chosen to take the lead role.

But sales have slumped in recent weeks, prompting theatre bosses to call time on the production.

The last performance will take place on 19 October.

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