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Author Topic:   Playwrights
AuthorAuthor
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From:Des Moines, Iowa
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posted December 16, 2006 02:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Here is a general topic for Playwrights.
-----------------
Noel Coward born 1899 in Teddington

Noel Coward started acting at an early age and his first play I'll Leave
It to You was staged in 1920. He achieved his first success with The
Vortex (1924), in which he starred, and followed this with a string of
popular comedies including Hay Fever (1925) and Private Lives (1930).
Coward's satiric humour and gift for witty dialogue was also brought to a
number of revues, including Words and Music which contains the famous 'Mad
Dogs and Englishmen'. The hugely entertaining Noel Coward Diaries, a
treasure-trove of theatre gossip from 1941 to 1969, were published in
1982. Coward also turned his hand to operettas, autobiographies and
several screenplays, including the war-time drama Brief Encounter. He was
knighted in 1970 and died in Jamaica in 1973.

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AuthorAuthor
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Posts: 1490
From:Des Moines, Iowa
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posted January 17, 2007 11:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Anton Chekhov born 1860 in Taganrog

Although it is now established as a classic of modern literature, The
Seagull received scathing notices when it was first performed in 1896, so
much so that the playwright Anton Chekhov swore that he would never write
another play. Happily, subsequent performances restored its reputation.
Here, as in his other works, Chekhov writes of the relationships between
men and women, and of the fragility of the moments in which they may
flourish or fail. The hero, Treplev, loses the two women most important to
him, his lover and his mother, to the same man and is plunged into a
suicidal depression. The Oxford collection also contains his other great
plays: Uncle Vanya, Three Sisters, Ivanov and The Cherry Orchard.

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AuthorAuthor
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From:Des Moines, Iowa
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posted March 12, 2007 01:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Edward Albee born 1928 in Washington, DC

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? was a hugely successful play in the 1960s.
It tells the story of a teacher and his wife who are invited to the home
of a burned-out professor and his foul-mouthed, bitter, yet seductive
wife. The guests get more than dinner, however, as the evening
deteriorates into brutal verbal battles between the hosts. The play was
adapted into an enormously successful movie by Mike Nichols in 1965.
Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor starred as the feuding couple,
spitting abuse at each other over their highballs.

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AuthorAuthor
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From:Des Moines, Iowa
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posted June 20, 2007 09:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Lillian Hellman born 1905 in New Orleans

Lillian Hellman was one of the great American playwrights of the century.
Her talents extended to the cinema in the 1940s and 1950s, where she
adapted many of her own plays, including The Little Foxes and Watch on the
Rhine, into award-winning films. However, her life proved even more
interesting than her work, as she was an intimate friend of writers from
Hemingway to Fitzgerald, Dashiell Hammett to Dorothy Parker. During the
McCarthy era when the witch-hunts were beginning, she was questioned
several times by the House Un-American Committee for communist leanings,
which she indeed had, having spent six months in the Soviet Union during
the Second World War. The character representing Hellman was played by
Jane Fonda in the classic 1970s film Julia, based on her memoirs of her
youthful political activity.

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AuthorAuthor
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posted October 10, 2007 12:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Harold Pinter born 1930 in London

One of the most important and prolific playwrights of the latter half of
the century, Pinter’s work has been compared to that of Ionesco for its
originality and innovation. His early plays include The Birthday Party and
The Dumb Waiter in the 1950s, and The Caretaker and The Homecoming in the
1960s. Subsequently his work became more diverse as he wrote for radio,
television and the screen, most notably adaptations of John Fowles’ The
French Lieutenant’s Woman for Karel Reisz, and Ian McEwan’s The Comfort of
Strangers for Paul Schrader. Recent years have also seen him become an
actor in his own work and on screen in Mansfield Park. He continues to be
a prolific writer and commentator into his seventies, half a century after
the ‘new wave’ of 1950s British playwrights revitalised the stage.

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AuthorAuthor
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posted October 16, 2007 09:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Oscar Wilde born 1854 in Dublin

Oscar Wilde is probably the best-known playwright of the late nineteenth
century. His series of comedies, Lady Windermere’s Fan, An Ideal Husband
and The Importance of Being Earnest, made him the toast of late Victorian
society. Wilde’s plays are still performed throughout the world (there are
numerous film adaptations) and the keenness of their wit has not been
blunted with time. His sad tale is well known: the fatal friendship with
‘Bosie’, Lord Alfred Douglas, the infamous court case, incarceration in
Reading Gaol. Broken in spirit and health by his taste of prison, Wilde
retired to Paris, dying in 1901. As he lay on his deathbed, he is alleged
to have uttered a last bon mot: ‘It’s no good. Either I or this
wall-paper - one of us has got to go!’ Also today, in 1927, the German
Nobel Prize-winner, Gunter Grass, was born in Danzig. His most recent
book, My Century, is an intriguing look at one hundred years of history
through a series of brief stories.

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AuthorAuthor
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posted November 02, 2007 09:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
George Bernard Shaw dies 1950 in Ayot, St Lawrence

George Bernard Shaw, born in Dublin in 1856, is best remembered as a
dramatist, although throughout his life he was a prolific writer,
satirist, novelist, critic, wit and journalist. A dedicated socialist, his
political leanings often had a major influence on his work, both in his
plays (such as Major Barbara) and in his commentaries (The Intelligent
Woman’s Guide to Socialism and Capitalism). Pygmalion is perhaps his most
famous work, the story of flower girl Eliza Doolittle who falls under the
tutelage of the bullying phonetician, Professor Henry Higgins. The play is
a brilliant and humorous reworking of the myth of Pygmalion, exposing the
inherent superficiality of the class system and its effect on individual
lives. Shaw endowed the National Gallery of Ireland in his will, a legacy
considerably enhanced by the royalties from the musical film version of
his play, My Fair Lady. Shaw, who died as the result of a fall from an
apple tree he was pruning, was also a Nobel prizewinner.

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AuthorAuthor
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From:Des Moines, Iowa
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posted December 16, 2007 10:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Noel Coward born 1899 in Teddington

Noel Coward started acting at an early age and his first play I'll Leave
It to You was staged in 1920. He achieved his first success with The
Vortex (1924), in which he starred, and followed this with a string of
popular comedies including Hay Fever (1925) and Private Lives (1930).
Coward's satiric humour and gift for witty dialogue was also brought to a
number of revues, including Words and Music which contains the famous 'Mad
Dogs and Englishmen'. The hugely entertaining Noel Coward Diaries, a
treasure-trove of theatre gossip from 1941 to 1969, were published in
1982. Coward also turned his hand to operettas, autobiographies and
several screenplays, including the war-time drama Brief Encounter. He was
knighted in 1970 and died in Jamaica in 1973.

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AuthorAuthor
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Posts: 1490
From:Des Moines, Iowa
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posted December 22, 2007 01:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
amuel Beckett dies 1989 in Paris

First published in France as En Attendant Godot in 1952, and staged a year
later, Waiting for Godot is a tragicomedy in two acts. An avant-garde
masterpiece, it was the first real success of the movement dubbed, by
critic Martin Esslin, ‘Theatre of the Absurd’. The play consists entirely
of conversations between Vladimir and Estragon, two tramps who are waiting
for the arrival of the mysterious Godot, who continually sends word to
them that he will appear, but who never does. Instead, they encounter
Lucky and Pozzo, discuss their miseries and their respective lots in life,
toy with the idea of hanging themselves, and continue to wait and wait.
The purpose of their lives is eludes them; maybe Godot has the answer.
Samuel Beckett received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1969.

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AuthorAuthor
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posted January 12, 2008 03:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Agatha Christie dies 1976 in Oxfordshire

Agatha Christie’s first novel, published in 1920, introduced readers to
the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot, who ranks with the inquisitive
spinster Miss Marple as one of Christie’s most famous creations. She wrote
about him throughout her career, and gives his fictive life a remarkable
denouement in Curtains. The Mysterious Affair at Styles opens with the
poisoning of Mrs Inglethorpe who dies uttering the name of her husband,
who is many years her junior. Poirot arrives to investigate the crime and,
although all the evidence points to him, the detective is not convinced of
the young widower’s guilt. Christie’s most famous book may well be Murder
on the Orient Express, but her finest is The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, a
detective novel that contains a simple, yet most unexpected, twist in its
tail.

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AuthorAuthor
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From:Des Moines, Iowa
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posted March 12, 2008 11:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Edward Albee born 1928 in Washington, DC

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? was a hugely successful play in the 1960s.
It tells the story of a teacher and his wife who are invited to the home
of a burned-out professor and his foul-mouthed, bitter, yet seductive
wife. The guests get more than dinner, however, as the evening
deteriorates into brutal verbal battles between the hosts. The play was
adapted into an enormously successful movie by Mike Nichols in 1965.
Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor starred as the feuding couple,
spitting abuse at each other over their highballs.

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AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1490
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted July 05, 2008 03:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
George Bernard Shaw resigns from the Edison Phone Co. 1880

George Bernard Shaw, born in Dublin in 1856, is best remembered as a dramatist, although throughout his life he was a prolific writer, satirist, novelist, critic, wit and journalist. A dedicated socialist, his political leanings often had a major influence on his work, both in his plays (such as Major Barbara) and in his commentaries (The Intelligent Woman’s Guide to Socialism and Capitalism). Pygmalion is perhaps his most famous work, the story of flower girl Eliza Doolittle who falls under the tutelage of the bullying phonetician, Professor Henry Higgins. The play is a brilliant and humorous reworking of the myth of Pygmalion, exposing the inherent superficiality of the class system and its effect on individual lives. The play was adapted to a screen musical in 1964 as My Fair Lady. Shaw was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1925.

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N F S I 2
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Posts: 641
From:Burbank, CA
Registered: Jun 2006

posted August 08, 2008 08:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for N F S I 2   Click Here to Email N F S I 2     Edit/Delete Message
Playwright Gray Dies


British playwright Simon Gray has died. He was 71.

Gray died in London on Wednesday following a long battle with cancer.

The writer penned dozens of plays for TV and radio, as well as enjoying success on Broadway. His most famous works include Otherwise Engaged and Butley - which starred Nathan Lane in its 2006 Broadway revival.

His most recent memoir, The Last Cigarette, is currently being cast for the London stage.

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NEWSFLASH
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From:Hollywood, CA
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posted August 12, 2008 08:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message
Hackford To Direct Tennessee Williams Biopic

Hollywood director Taylor Hackford is taking the life of legendary playwright Tennessee Williams to the big screen.

Dame Helen Mirren's film maker husband will direct Tenn, which will detail Williams' difficult upbringing and the depression he suffered throughout his life - as well as how the hardships he endured fuelled his writing.

Williams, who died in 1983 aged 71, wrote some of American theatre's great classics including A Streetcar Named Desire, The Glass Menagerie and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.

Producer Michael Ohoven claims the movie will bear similarities to Bennett Miller's Oscar-winning Truman Capote biopic Capote - which he also produced.

He tells Daily Variety, "I had that same incredible feeling reading this script that I had on Capote and here again is an extremely dramatic story about how a torn and twisted life led Williams to write such great successes."

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N F S I 2
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posted August 20, 2008 08:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for N F S I 2   Click Here to Email N F S I 2     Edit/Delete Message
Blanchett's Husband 'Enjoys' Paparazzi

20 August 2008 9:01 AM, PDT

Cate Blanchett's playwright husband Andrew Upton enjoys encounters with photographers - because he is pleased with the attention his wife receives as a Hollywood star.

Upton, Blanchett's co-artistic director at Australia's Sydney Theatre Company, gladly accepts paparazzi shadowing his partner, and insists their presence is recognition of her talent.

He says, "I quite enjoy it, actually. I'm never followed but Cate is. Her public identity is very associated with her work, which I think is good, right and proper because she's bloody good at it.

"When her work is coming into focus, people want to see a photo of her carrying shopping bags. I can understand it - people are interested and I'm glad they're interested otherwise they wouldn't come to see it (her movies)."

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