Manka Bros. Studios - Home
  Manka Bros. Message Boards
  Theatre
  This Day In Theatre History (Page 1)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

UBBFriend: Email This Page to Someone!
This topic is 3 pages long:   1  2  3 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   This Day In Theatre History
AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted March 14, 2007 09:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Henrik Ibsen’s Ghosts opens 1891 in London

Scandinavian drama is well represented by the twin peaks of Henrik Ibsen
and August Strindberg. Ibsen (1828-1906) managed to cause great
controversy in 1891 when his play Ghosts opened. Dealing as it did with
venereal diseases, it was initially savaged by hostile critics, although
Ibsen’s reputation grew over subsequent years as he was championed by the
likes of George Bernard Shaw. He is credited with being the first major
dramatist to write tragedy about ordinary people in prose. His other
notable works include A Doll’s House (1879) and Peer Gynt (1867). August
Strindberg also caused controversy in his career, writing over fifty plays
in the course of his life, as well as novels, short stories, poems and an
autobiography. He is best remembered for The Father, which depicts the
battle of the sexes, while Miss Julie considers the same topic but this
time injecting the added troubles of class into the story. Strindberg,
considered a master dramatist by Eugene O’Neill, is a founding father of
the drama of naturalism.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted April 13, 2007 01:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Samuel Beckett born 1906 in Dublin

First published in French as En Attendant Godot in 1952, and subsequently
produced a year later, Waiting for Godot is a tragicomedy in two acts. One
of the most innovative dramas in literary history, it also represented the
first success of the Theatre of the Absurd. The play consists entirely of
conversations between Vladimir and Estragon, two tramps who are waiting
for the arrival of the mysterious Godot, who continually sends word to
them that he will appear but who never does. Instead, they encounter Lucky
and Pozzo, they discuss their miseries and their lots in life, they
consider hanging themselves, and wait, and wait. Their presumption that
they are there for a purpose, albeit inscrutable to them but no doubt
known to Godot, who, if he deigns to appear (if, indeed, he exists) will
reveal all, is the human predicament in a nutshell. Samuel Beckett was
awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1969.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted April 17, 2007 10:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Thornton Wilder born 1897 in Wisconsin

A novelist and dramatist, Thornton Wilder's works for the theatre include
The Matchmaker (made into a musical as Hello Dolly) and The Skin of Our
Teeth. Much of his work explores the idea of synchronicity, the idea that
our destinies move in a circle, that what will be will be; he sees our
lives as interwoven according to an inscrutable plan, and the point where
our ‘circles’ touch as the moment of crisis. His 1927 novel The Bridge at
San Luis Rey tells the story of the collapse of a bridge in
eighteenth-century Peru, its fall killing five people who have all been
destined to meet on the bridge just at the moment of its collapse. The
Ides of March (1948) applies the concept of synchronicity to the story of
the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BC. Also on this date in 1884,
the Danish writer Isak Dinesen was born. She was the author of the memoir
Out Of Africa, filmed in 1985 starring Meryl Streep.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted April 26, 2007 09:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Oscar Wilde is imprisoned 1895

A celebrated novelist and playwight, with his masterpiece The Importance
of Being Earnest having opened to ecstatic reviews, Oscar Wilde could not
have imagined that he would end the year of 1895 imprisoned in Reading
Gaol. Although married to Constance Lloyd and the father of two children,
Wilde's homosexuality was well known and his relationship with Lord Alfred
Douglas was a source of great irritation to Lord Alfred's father, the
Marquis of Queensberry. A card, left by the Marquis at Wilde's club,
addressed 'To Oscar Wilde posing as a Somdomite' (sic), enraged Lord
Alfred who encouraged Wilde to sue his father for libel. The course of
action had disastrous results and Wilde found himself on trial on a charge
of homosexuality. While friends were urging him to flee abroad, Wilde
consulted a palmist, Mrs Robinson, who assured him that he would triumph.
Wilde was convicted and sentenced to two years imprisonment. De Profundis,
his letter addressed to Lord Alfred, dates from this time. He was released
in 1897, his health having deteriorated, and spent his last years in Paris
where he died in 1900. The Ballad of Reading Gaol (1898) is based on his
experience of prison. Wilde's other plays include Lady Windermere's Fan,
An Ideal Husband and Salome. His Gothic novel The Portrait of Dorian Gray
remains popular today.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted May 24, 2007 10:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Henrik Ibsen dies 1906 in Oslo

Scandinavian drama is well represented by the twin peaks of Henrik Ibsen
and August Strindberg. Ibsen (born in 1828) managed to cause great
controversy in 1891 when his play Ghosts opened. Dealing as it did with
venereal diseases, it was initially savaged by hostile critics, although
Ibsen’s reputation grew over the subsequent years as he was championed by
the likes of George Bernard Shaw. He is credited with being the first
major dramatist to write tragedy about ordinary people in prose. His other
notable works include A Doll’s House (1879) and Peer Gynt (1867). August
Strindberg also caused controversy in his career, writing over fifty plays
in the course of his life, as well as novels, short stories, poems and an
autobiography. He is best remembered for The Father, which depicts the
battle of the sexes, while Miss Julie considers the same topic but this
time injecting the added trouble of class conflict into the story.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted May 30, 2007 11:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Christopher Marlowe is fatally stabbed in a tavern brawl 1593

Born in 1564 in Canterbury, son of a shoemaker, Christopher Marlowe
graduated from Cambridge in 1587 already a dramatist, with The Tragedy of
Dido and Tamburlaine the Great likely to have been written, at least in
part, at Cambridge. His wayward life has been a source of intrigue to
scholars through the centuries, his violence and criminal associations
having led to arrests and deportations. He was involved in a brawl during
which a man was killed in 1589 and was deported from the Netherlands on a
charge of fraud in 1592. Rumours of espionage also surrounded Marlowe yet,
despite his lifestyle, he was a highly regarded and influential playwright
of his day and his influence on the early work of Shakespeare is
undisputed. The Jew of Malta and Dr Faustus are among his most enduring
works. On this day in 1593, Marlowe was murdered by Ingram Frizer in a
Deptford tavern during an argument over the bill. A warrant had been
issued for his arrest at the time of his death for disseminating atheistic
opinions.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted June 20, 2007 09:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Lillian Hellman born 1905 in New Orleans

Lillian Hellman was one of the great American playwrights of the century.
Her talents extended to the cinema in the 1940s and 1950s, where she
adapted many of her own plays, including The Little Foxes and Watch on the
Rhine, into award-winning films. However, her life proved even more
interesting than her work, as she was an intimate friend of writers from
Hemingway to Fitzgerald, Dashiell Hammett to Dorothy Parker. During the
McCarthy era when the witch-hunts were beginning, she was questioned
several times by the House Un-American Committee for communist leanings,
which she indeed had, having spent six months in the Soviet Union during
the Second World War. The character representing Hellman was played by
Jane Fonda in the classic 1970s film Julia, based on her memoirs of her
youthful political activity.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted June 26, 2007 02:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Jean Anouilh born 1910 in Bordeaux

One of France’s leading playwrights of the last century, Anouilh
dramatises in Becket the relationship between the Archbishop of
Canterbury, Thomas Becket, and King Henry II. Their once strong friendship
falls apart as Becket’s power grows and he finds himself less in need of
help from the king. He struggles with his developing beliefs about the
secular role of the church, and finds himself increasingly in conflict
with the monarch. Becket's sudden and dramatic conversion provides the
catalyst for the subsequent tragedy. The play was brought to the screen in
1964 with the venerable talents of Richard Burton and Peter O’Toole in the
lead roles.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted June 29, 2007 08:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
The Globe Theatre destroyed by fire 1613

It’s hard to think of a set of plays so closely associated with one
particular theatre as the plays of William Shakespeare are with the Globe.
Shakespeare wrote there, acted there, and because of his close association
with the theatre many of the plays were written with the size and
dimensions of the stage and the theatre itself in mind. On 29 June 1613,
the original Globe Theatre burned to the ground. It was rebuilt the
following year but eventually demolished in 1644, thus depriving England
of what would have ranked as one of its great historical sites. It was, of
course, rebuilt to its original design and reopened successfully in 1997,
after a restoration programme that set new records in fidelity to
architectural history. Also on this day, in 1900, Antoine de Saint-Exupery
published his much-loved children’s tale, The Little Prince.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted July 05, 2007 02:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
George Bernard Shaw resigns from the Edison Phone Co. 1880

George Bernard Shaw, born in Dublin in 1856, is best remembered as a
dramatist, although throughout his life he was a prolific writer,
satirist, novelist, critic, wit and journalist. A dedicated socialist, his
political leanings often had a major influence on his work, both in his
plays (such as Major Barbara) and in his commentaries (The Intelligent
Woman’s Guide to Socialism and Capitalism). Pygmalion is perhaps his most
famous work, the story of flower girl Eliza Doolittle who falls under the
tutelage of the bullying phonetician, Professor Henry Higgins. The play is
a brilliant and humorous reworking of the myth of Pygmalion, exposing the
inherent superficiality of the class system and its effect on individual
lives. The play was adapted to a screen musical in 1964 as My Fair Lady.
Shaw was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1925.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted July 22, 2007 02:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
The Merchant of Venice is entered on the Plays’ Register 1598

Written between 1596 and 1597, William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of
Venice was entered thus on the Plays’ Register on this day a year later:
‘The most excellent Historie of the Merchant of Venice. With the extreme
crueltie of Shylocke the Jewe towards the sayd Merchant, in cutting a iust
pound of his flesh: and the obtaining of Portia by the choyse of three
chests. As it hath beene diuers times acted by the Lord Chamberlaine his
seruants. Written by William Shakespeare.’ The source of the bond theme
was Il Pecarone (The Simpleton) by Ser Giovanni Fiorentino and the idea of
the caskets was from Richard Robinson’s version of the Gesta Romanorum.
The play also contains some parallels to Christopher Marlowe’s The Jew of
Malta.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted July 26, 2007 01:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
George Bernard Shaw born 1856 in Dublin

George Bernard Shaw, born in Dublin in 1856, is best remembered as a
dramatist, although throughout his life he was a prolific writer,
satirist, novelist, critic, wit and journalist. A dedicated socialist, his
political leanings often had a major influence on his work, both in his
plays (such as Major Barbara) and in his commentaries (The Intelligent
Woman’s Guide to Socialism and Capitalism). Pygmalion is perhaps his most
famous work, the story of flower girl Eliza Doolittle who falls under the
tutelage of the bullying phonetician, Professor Henry Higgins. The play is
a brilliant and humorous reworking of the myth of Pygmalion, exposing the
inherent superficiality of the class system and its effect on individual
lives. The play was adapted to a screen musical in 1964 as My Fair Lady.
Shaw was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1925. Also on this day
in 1894, novelist Aldous Huxley was born in Surrey, while a year later, in
1895, poet and novelist Robert Graves was born in London.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted August 09, 2007 12:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
John Dryden born 1631 in Northamptonshire

Most of John Dryden’s early writings were created for the theatre,
although he published poems that celebrated the return of the monarchy and
Annus Mirabilis, a poem in quatrains about the Anglo-Dutch war and the
Great Fire of London. He was made Poet Laureate in 1668. The troubled
constitutional and religious politics of Charles II’s reign prompted
Dryden to produce the great satires, MacFlecknoe and Absalom and
Achitophel, in which he used the biblical story to draw parallels with
Monmouth’s claim to the succession to the throne. In later life he became
a Catholic, which lost him his court positions. Many of his later works
were in the politically less compromising field of translation. His
versions of Virgil are particularly fine. His wit and his enormous
technical skill enabled him to perfect the heroic couplet, the favoured
metrical form for poets throughout the following century. He died in 1700.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted August 20, 2007 10:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Lady Gregory founds the Abbey Theatre, Dublin 1904

Lady Gregory was born Isabella Augusta Persse at Roxborough, County
Galway, in 1852. In 1880, she married Sir William Gregory of Coole, County
Galway, the match introducing her to the broader world of Victorian ideas.
She became a cultural nationalist in outlook, and collected as many
folktales as she could from the villages and towns of Galway. She met W.B.
Yeats in 1896 and thus started a lifelong friendship. She invited him and
many other artists and writers of the Irish Literary Revival to her house
in Coole Park to write and develop their ideas. It was while staying there
that Yeats, Edward Martyn and Lady Gregory thought up the idea of the
Irish Literary Theatre, which would later become The Abbey. She wrote more
than forty plays for its repertoire.

IP: Logged

AuthorAuthor
A-List Writer

Posts: 1549
From:Des Moines, Iowa
Registered: Jul 2000

posted October 04, 2007 10:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AuthorAuthor   Click Here to Email AuthorAuthor     Edit/Delete Message
Damon Runyon born 1884 in Kansas

Damon Runyon was a chronicler of life in New York in the 1930s and 1940s,
particularly along the Broadway strip. His characters are a collection of
absurd and grotesque gangsters, molls and shady dealers, whose
interactions are marked by the humour rather than the violence of their
real-world counterparts. The dialogue of the Runyon stories is unique, and
was convincingly adapted by the screenwriter Joseph L. Mankievicz for the
movie version of Guys and Dolls, which, starring Marlon Brando and Frank
Sinatra, famously declared in its advance publicity, ‘Brando Sings!’ The
cool and surprisingly romantic Sky Masterson, the fear-of-commitment of
Nathan Detroit and the adenoidal Adelaide are all hilarious
representations of an invented Broadway mythology.

IP: Logged


This topic is 3 pages long:   1  2  3 

All times are PT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | Manka Bros. Studios - Home

© 2011 Manka Bros. Studios - All Rights Reserved.

Powered by Infopop www.infopop.com © 2000
Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.45b