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Author Topic:   Joost
HollywoodProducer
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From:La Canada
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posted May 10, 2007 05:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message
We're going to be hearing a lot about this one - so here's a new topic.

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HollywoodProducer
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From:La Canada
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posted May 10, 2007 05:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message
CBS, Viacom, Others Invest $45 Million in Internet TV Service Joost
A group of five prominent media and venture capital companies, including CBS Corp. and Viacom Inc., have invested $45 million in Joost, a company attempting to broadcast television over the Internet, they said Thursday. Joost -- pronounced "juiced" -- was co-founded by Janus Friis and Niklas Zennstrom, the entrepreneurs who upset the music industry with the Kazaa file-sharing service and then developed Skype, the Internet telephone system that was bought by eBay Inc. for $2.6 billion in 2005. "We've carefully selected these investors from a variety of interested parties," Friis said in a statement. They "bring unique assets to Joost that will enable us to significantly accelerate growth and development of the Company." The other investors were one each from North America, Europe and Asia: Silicon Valley venture capital firm Sequoia Capital, Europe's Index Ventures and the Li Ka Shing Foundation, founded by the chairman of Asian conglomerate Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. All received stakes of an undisclosed size in Joost for their investments, Joost said. Viacom's participation is especially noteworthy: It struck a deal to supply content from Comedy Central and Paramount Pictures to Joost earlier this month, shortly after it filed suit against Google Inc. for alleged copyright infringement by YouTube, Google's free online video service. Joost markets itself as a way for media companies to retain control and receive payment for video when they distribute it over the Internet. Unlike YouTube, Joost does not allow users to upload videos, and it distributes only professional content. While YouTube pulls down videos only when copyright holders complain of infringement, Joost promises to actively fight piracy of the shows on its system. Like regular TV, Joost is ad-supported and free for viewers. While not yet fully open to the public, the company has advertising trials with Coca-Cola Co., Nike Inc., Microsoft Corp., Procter & Gamble Co., Sony Corp. and Visa. Roelof Botha, a partner at Sequoia, said in a statement he was betting on Joost because it offers something to media companies, viewers, and advertisers. To use Joost, viewers have to download and run its software, which is free, but for now only available on invitation from existing members. It appears on the computer's screen as an interface that resembles a TV remote control. The service increases speeds and saves on bandwidth costs by using a decentralized distribution system that streams videos from user to user over the Internet -- technology similar to that underlying Kazaa and Skype. Joost is majority-owned by Friis and Zennstrom via their Luxembourg-based Joost Operations SA, but it has offices in New York, London and Leiden, Netherlands, and expects to incorporate under the Joost name globally.

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fred
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From:Redmond, WA
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posted June 14, 2007 05:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message
Joost offers free TV shows online, but test version lacks juice

Maybe Joost really does represent the future of television. But for now the new, ad-supported Internet TV service feels retro — and thin.
Joost lets you watch a variety of full-length TV shows for free on a computer. But there's no live programming at the moment, and the sparse lineup is underwhelming.


TALKING TECH: Tips for buying the right HDTV for Father's Day
On my PC, I took in black-and-white episodes of Lassie from the '50s and Nickelodeon's The Ren and Stimpy Show from more than a decade ago. There's some fresher programming (but not a lot), with more promised.

Still, anyone who viewed classic TV in its heyday couldn't do what a Joost viewer can: build online communities, chat and swap instant messages, and watch whenever they want.

Indeed, Joost (pronounced juiced) is gaining attention because it is the brainchild of Niklas Zennstrom and Janus Friis, co-founders of the popular Skype Internet phone service and the controversial Kazaa file-sharing service.

Joost is based on "peer-to-peer" technology similar to what Skype uses on calls. Like Skype, you can access Joost from any newer computer connected to the Web.

Joost has attracted high-profile content partners including CBS, CNN, Turner Broadcasting, Warner Bros., Sony and Viacom. CBS and Viacom, along with venture capital firms, are financial backers. It has also signed more than 30 advertising partners, including Coca-Cola, Hewlett-Packard, Intel and Nike.

But several questions pop to mind: Who wants to watch TV on computers? Will those willing watch anything longer than 10 minutes, the maximum length of YouTube videos? How interactive are users likely to get?

To be fair, however those questions ultimately are answered, Joost is in its early "beta" test phase.

Currently, you need an invitation from friends or bloggers to try it. What's in store:

•The Joost experience. You'll have to download software onto your PC or Mac. I received a message that my new Windows Vista PC might not have the goods to run Joost. In fact, my system has more than enough memory and processing power.

Despite the mistaken warning, Joost behaved. A Mac installation went more smoothly.

Joost starts up in full-screen mode. The broadcast-quality video isn't half bad, though some shows look like they were recorded onto VHS cassettes. Joost is capable of delivering high-definition but isn't doing so yet.

The service includes controls for restarting, pausing and skipping. The interface, which you can hide, is slick but a tad confusing at first. Main icons are on the left, right and top side of the screen. Player controls and a search box are in a window on the bottom.

•Finding stuff to watch. Joost executive David Clark told me the "content choices are potentially infinite," with a lot you just won't find anywhere else. There is no exclusivity, however, so if a show is worth watching, it might turn up elsewhere. Joost says it respects copyright holders and will adhere to a code of conduct (e.g., no porn).

More than 150 channels and thousands of hours of video are on Joost, from MTV and Reuters to Sports Illustrated Swimsuit On Demand. You can search channels by genres, most popular, staff picks, etc. You can also type in a search phrase, but the feature is imperfect: You must click a second time before generating matches. Typing "snake" found a Lassie episode and shows on snake wranglers.

The thin lineup is evident even when clicking on major TV brands. On the Comedy Central channel, for example, you'll find episodes of the since-canceled Strangers with Candy and Stella series but not The Colbert Report or The Daily Show. NHL hockey playoff coverage does not include the Stanley Cup finals that concluded a week ago.

This summer, CBS is promising new and previously aired episodes from its CSI franchise, plus Survivor and Showtime Championship Boxing. Full-length movies are also in Joost's future.

Shows are accompanied by short ads —1½ to 3 minutes every hour, the company says. You can pause but not skip the ads, which ultimately will be targeted to what you are watching.

Ad overlays are also available for every program; viewers have the option to click on them to learn more about the products being pitched.

•Going social. Joost is ultimately about building communities. You can chat live with others watching the same channels. The service also works with Gmail and Jabber instant-messaging accounts.

Joost adds a diversion for those who spend lots of time in front of the computer. But though you might actually stumble on something interesting, the service has a very long way to go.

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HollywoodProducer
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posted June 30, 2007 11:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message
Everyone’s Gunning For YouTube
Michael Arrington
14 comments »

The focus and experimentation on IPTV is switching away from watching short clips on YouTube to watching full length shows on downloadable TV applications like Joost, Babelgum, Veoh TV , Netflix (which now has a Silverlight application) and others. YouTube continues to grow, but people are not looking to find full length TV shows there.

That isn’t stopping the competitors from trying to get a piece of the action, though.

YouTube has a slew of direct competitors, but the network effect kicked in long ago for YouTube and its unlikely that loose copyright policies or higher quality videos are going to make any kind of dent in their market share. But the networks are still goggling that $1.65 billion price tag for YouTube, and they want their pound of flesh.

Competitors Running In Circles

Hitwise published some statistics earlier this week showing that YouTube has 60% market share of the U.S. video sharing sites - they have more visitors than all of their competitors combined. They continue to grow at a fast clip even after the networks started massive litigation against them.

Comscore worldwide data is nearly identical, showing YouTube with a 66% market share. See the chart to the left for the side-by-side numbers.

It’s clear that the market is probably big enough for a few competitors to be successful, but no one is knocking YouTube off the thrown any time soon.

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fred
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From:Redmond, WA
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posted July 14, 2007 02:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message
This one could be a bust. Watch it very carefully. I'm not seeing a lot of momentum for Joost.

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fred
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From:Redmond, WA
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posted July 25, 2007 05:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message
For the first time, Internet video startup Joost has revealed its numbers: 1 million beta testers have signed up, despite the fact that the service remains invite only. So said Joost co-founder Niklas Zennström at a Skype press event in Tallinn, Estonia.

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fred
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posted October 13, 2008 11:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message
From TechCrunch.com

Without much fanfare, Joost has finally turned on the browser version of its Web video service, as we noted it would last month. The new site is all based on Flash, and lets you watch old Bruce Lee flicks, Sci-Fi movies like The Fifth Element, and clips from Barely Political and Comedy Central.

The Flash site comes almost exactly a year after I wrote a post pointing out that Joost’s peer-to-peer software approach would not work and that it would have to switch over to Flash-based video, just like every other Web video service. People don’t want to have to launch a new piece of software to watch video on their computers. They want to watch it in their browsers (so they can quickly surf to another page when they realize how much the video they are watching sucks—or, if it doesn’t suck, quickly switch tabs when the boss walks by their desk).

It took Joost a year, but it has finally realized that the Web is where it’s at. Now all it has to do is compete with Hulu, YouTube, Veoh, DailyMotion, and the hundred other video sites out there.

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indiedan
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From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted October 14, 2008 01:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message
Joost Jousts Again

14 October 2008 10:28 AM, PDT

Joost, the online video site that was supposed to be the CBS-backed alternative to NBC and News Corp's Hulu and Google's YouTube, is being relaunched today (Tuesday) after its original iteration failed to attract viewers. From now on, Joost's videos will be streamed using Flash video rather than Joost's proprietary software, which some users reportedly regarded as too complicated to install and use. The announcement comes one day after CBS and YouTube announced a deal under which longform CBS and Showtime shows would be made available on YouTube. However, Joost says it is launching with 46,000 professionally produced videos. With Joost, people will also be able to communicate through various interactive links with others who are viewing the shows, the website said.

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a
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posted February 25, 2009 10:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for a   Click Here to Email a     Edit/Delete Message
Joost Looks Outside For Tech Help
Dan Frommer|Feb. 25, 2009, 11:45 AM|6
Tags: Media, Hulu, Video, Entertainment, CBS, Joost

Web video site Joost has signed on with Web video provider Ooyala to power some of its back-end video processing. In theory, the deal will let Joost focus more on building a Web TV service people that more people want to watch.

Ooyala will provide video uploading and transcoding services to Joost for some -- not all -- of its content providers, the company says. Joost's users won't notice a thing -- the changes will be on the back end only.

What's the point? This is a service that Joost could easily farm out and potentially do for cheaper than it can do in-house. (In theory, Joost could operate with a leaner tech staff, too.)

Meanwhile, Joost CEO Mike Volpi and staff need to focus on building a Web TV service that can compete better with sites like Hulu, which launched after Joost but has since dwarfed it.

Joost raised $45 million in 2007 and hired Volpi away from Cisco (CSCO), where he was a rising star. Its content partners include CBS, a Hulu holdout and Joost investor.

NewTeeVee noted the partnership earlier this month, but didn't have details.

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fred
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From:Redmond, WA
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posted September 14, 2009 09:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message
Joost a Little Misunderstanding Between Friends? Not Really, but Please Enjoy the Video From Better Days!

by Kara Swisher

Revenge is a dish best served cold–except, of course, when one decides to serve it piping hot.

And that’s just what part of one of the losing sides of the $2 billion deal to buy Skype from eBay (EBAY) is doing in an unusual attack on Michelangelo Volpi, a well-known tech exec in Silicon Valley.

You see, until recently, Volpi was CEO of Joost, arriving at the much-hyped online video start-up to great fanfare in mid-2007.

But the London-based Joost never quite caught fire and began layoffs and contraction this summer.

As part of that development, Volpi then went to Index Ventures, a venture firm also based in London.

And, in one of Volpi’s first deals, Index was one of the smaller players on the winning side of the deal to buy Skype, putting up $75 million.

But, also vying for the prize were the Internet telephony service’s original founders, Niklas Zennström and Janus Friis, who had hooked up with a group of private equity investors.

To complicate things futher, the innovative and entrepreneurial pair also own a company called Joltid, which has licensed key technology for Skype to eBay.

It gets better! Joltid and eBay have been fighting in court over that agreement, bickering back and forth about whether eBay violated the terms of that deal or not.

Finally, in the past few days, in what is an obviously related move, Joost said that it had dumped Volpi as a director and as chairman, a job he had retained when he left for Index in July.

Said the company in a statement:

“Mr. Volpi was removed from the board of directors and from his position as chairman of Joost by shareholder vote. The company and its board of directors is conducting an investigation into Mr. Volpi’s actions during his tenure as CEO and as chairman.”

Volpi had no comment.

BoomTown does: It looks like a lame attempt at kneecapping him to me, as part of a larger rumble!

But, for many, this comes as a surprise, since it had been thought Volpi–a former dealmaker with Cisco (CSCO)–would play the role of a peacemaker in the eBay-Joltid fighting.

Actually, according to numerous sources, Volpi had also struggled with Zennström and Friis when he ran Joost and there is no love lost among them.

In fact, here’s a glimpse of that tension in a video interview BoomTown did with Volpi a year ago in London, when I went to visits its offices there.

It took place just after Joost was forced to rejigger itself to gain momentum (which never happened).

“Restarting a start-up is definitely not easy,” said Volpi in the interview.

As it turned out, that was the least of his worries.

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fred
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posted November 24, 2009 10:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message

Joost Finally Acquired, By Online Ad Network Adconion

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So Joost’s been put out of its misery and its assets have been acquired by Santa Monica, CA-based online ad network Adconion Media Group. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but likely would have been pennies on the dollar, compared to the money that was invested in the once much-hyped online video service. Adconion is also part funded by Joost backed Index Ventures. What’s part of the sale: some tech assets, trademark and Joost.com. Adconion PR told us that it plans to keep operating Joost.com, the consumer video service. About a dozen employees of Joost have joined Adconion, out of about 20, which means rest were probably let go. Also, miraculously, some part of Joost is continuing on as a separate company, though it isn’t yet clear what and who’s left; we’re trying to find out.

This comes after Joost gave up the consumer online video market back in June, and decided to focus on white label services. Adconion says that fits well with its own business, as it recently expanded into video advertising. Rumors to the sale of Joost to Adconion started surfacing earlier this month, along with the news that Joost’s UK branch was bankrupt.

Meanwhile, Adconion, founded in 2004 as EuroClick, has been buying off companies in the last year, helped generously by a huge $80 million in VC funding back in February to expand into the US market.

Joost was founded in early 2007 by Janus Friis and Niklas Zennstroem, the founders of Skype and Kazaa who then moved on to start their own venture fund and eventually leave Skype/Ebay, and are now famously back as part owners of Skype. It had raised upwards of $50 million in funding.

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