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Author Topic:   Twitter
fred
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Posts: 8210
From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted August 26, 2009 08:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Who’s Driving Twitter’s Popularity? Not Teens
By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER

Kristen Nagy, an 18-year-old from Sparta, N.J., sends and receives 500 text messages a day. But she never uses Twitter, even though it publishes similar snippets of conversations and observations.

“I just think it’s weird and I don’t feel like everyone needs to know what I’m doing every second of my life,” she said.

Her reluctance to use Twitter, a feeling shared by others in her age group, has not doomed the microblogging service. Just 11 percent of its users are aged 12 to 17, according to comScore. Instead, Twitter’s unparalleled explosion in popularity has been driven by a decidedly older group. That success has shattered a widely held belief that young people lead the way to popularizing innovations.

“The traditional early-adopter model would say that teenagers or college students are really important to adoption,” said Andrew Lipsman, director of industry analysis at comScore. Teenagers, after all, drove the early growth of the social networks Facebook, MySpace and Friendster.

Twitter, however, has proved that “a site can take off in a different demographic than you expect and become very popular,” he said. “Twitter is defying the traditional model.”

In fact, though teenagers fueled the early growth of social networks, today they account for 14 percent of MySpace’s users and only 9 percent of Facebook’s. As the Web grows up, so do its users, and for many analysts, Twitter’s success represents a new model for Internet success. The notion that children are essential to a new technology’s success has proved to be largely a myth.

Adults have driven the growth of many perennially popular Web services. YouTube attracted young adults and then senior citizens before teenagers piled on. Blogger’s early user base was adults and LinkedIn has built a successful social network with professionals as its target.

The same goes for gadgets. Though video games were originally marketed for children, Nintendo Wiis quickly found their way into nursing homes. Kindle from Amazon caught on first with adults and many gadgets, like iPhones and GPS devices, are largely adult-only.

Similarly, Twitter did not attract the young trendsetters at the outset. Its growth has instead come from adults who might not have used other social sites before Twitter, said Jeremiah Owyang, an industry analyst studying social media. “Adults are just catching up to what teens have been doing for years,” he said.

Many young people, who have used Facebook since they began using the Internet and for whom text messaging is their primary method of communication, say they simply do not have a need for Twitter.

Almost everyone under 35 uses social networks, but the growth of these networks over the last year has come from older adults, according to a report from Forrester Research issued Tuesday. Use of social networking by people aged 35 to 54 grew 60 percent in the last year.

Another reason that teenagers do not use Twitter may be that their lives tend to revolve around their friends. Though Twitter’s founders originally conceived of the site as a way to stay in touch with acquaintances, it turns out that it is better for broadcasting ideas or questions and answers to the outside world or for marketing a product. It is also useful for marketing the person doing the tweeting, a need few teenagers are attuned to.

“Many people use it for professional purposes — keeping connected with industry contacts and following news,” said Evan Williams, Twitter’s co-founder and chief executive. “Because it’s a one-to-many network and most of the content is public, it works for this better than a social network that’s optimized for friend communication.”

Wendy Grazier, a mother in Arkansas, said her two teenaged daughters thought Twitter was “lame,” yet they asked her to follow teenage pop stars like Miley Cyrus and Taylor Swift on Twitter so she could report back on what the celebrities wrote. Why won’t they deign to do it themselves? “It seems more, like, professional, and not something that a teenager would do,” said 16-year-old Miranda Grazier. “I think I might join when I’m older.”

The public nature of Twitter is particularly sensitive for the under-18 set, whether because they want to hide what they are doing from their parents or, more often, because their parents restrict their interaction with strangers on the Web.

Georgia Marentis, a 14-year-old in Great Falls, Va., uses Facebook instead of Twitter because she can choose who sees her updates. “My parents wouldn’t want me to have everything going on in my life displayed for the entire world,” she said. (Of course, because of the public nature of social networks and the ease of creating a fake identity on the Web, even sites with more privacy settings have proved dangerous for young people in some cases.)

Many young people use the Web not to keep up with the issues of the day but to form and express their identities, said Andrea Forte, who studied how high school students use social media for her dissertation. (She will be an assistant professor at Drexel University in the spring.)

“Your identity on Twitter is more your ability to take an interesting conversational turn, throw an interesting bit of conversation out there. Your identity isn’t so much identified by the music you listen to and the quizzes you take,” as it is on Facebook, she said. She called Twitter “a comparatively adult kind of interaction.”

For Twitter’s future, young people’s ambivalence could be a good thing. Teenagers may be more comfortable using new technologies, but they are also notoriously fickle. Although they drove the growth of Friendster and MySpace, they then moved on from those sites to Facebook.

Perhaps Twitter’s experience will encourage Web start-ups to take a more realistic view of who uses the Web and go after a broader audience, Ms. Forte said. “Older populations are a smart thing to be thinking about, as opposed to eternally going after the 15- through 19-year-olds,” she said.

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fred
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From:Redmond, WA
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posted September 02, 2009 09:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Google Or Microsoft Should Buy Twitter For $2B, Says Buddy Media's Lazerow
Heather Leonard|Sep. 2, 2009, 10:25 AM|comment6
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Tags: Startups, Buddy Media, Twitter, Facebook, Big Tech, Social Networking, Google, Microsoft, Online, Interview

Michael Lazerow, CEO Buddy Media, predicts that Twitter will continue to scale and then sell within the next year so someone else can figure out the annoying business model part.

If he were Google or Microsoft, he would cough up $2 billion and somehow harness the 100-200 million users later.

On the Twitter war with Facebook, Mike says Twitter is not toast because it's fundamentally a different platform. Facebook is the biggest thing since Google, whereas Twitter is a personal newswire. And lets face it, FriendFeed never had anything on Twitter anyway.

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indiedan
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posted September 11, 2009 03:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
AOL's New Twitter iPhone App Is Called "AIM"

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indiedan
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posted September 22, 2009 04:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ashley Greene Joins Twitter, An 'Eclipse' Pic And Tom Felton's Birthday In Today's Twitter-Wood

"Twilight" was out in full force today in in the Twitter-Wood feed, with David Slade providing his usual posts -- this time with a behind-the-scenes pic -- and Ashley Greene joining her fellow "Eclipse" cast members by registering a verified Twitter account. Needless to say, she has been added to our follow list.

In non-"Twilight" news Tom Felton had a birthday today, and it sounds like he had a good time watching "Entourage" and hanging out at the beach. Elsewhere, Tyrese Gibson posted an old shot of himself with Tupac Shakur, and Elizabeth Banks explained a disturbing dream she had last night about Matthew Perry. Read them all below. I'm @brianwarmoth, and this is the Twitter-Wood report for September 22, 2009.

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fred
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From:Redmond, WA
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posted November 13, 2009 09:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has Twitter's Finest Hours (Seconds) Come and Gone?
GOLDMAN, JIM GOLDMAN, TECH CHECK, BLOG, CNBC, CNBC.COM, TECHNOLOGY, TECH STOCKS, TECH SECTOR, INTERNET, E-COMMERCE, WEB, NET, TWITTER, COMSCORE
Posted By: Jim Goldman | CNBC Silicon Valley Bureau Chief
cnbc.com
| 13 Nov 2009 | 10:29 AM ET

Has the sun begun to set on Twitter? Has its finest moments faded into the past?

It's probably too soon to sing the company's death knell, but there are disturbing trends afoot that suggest times are getting increasingly tougher for the nano-blogging site trying so hard to maintain some sense of relevance.

The latest metrics from comScore paint a rough picture for Twitter: Americans using the site decline 7.9 percent in October, compared to September, signaling the second monthly decline for the site in 2009. Yes, the site still boasts 19.2 million users, but the company's growth of less than 1 percent in September, and an actual decline tracked in August is a real problem.

Why? Because even during the dot com bubble Web sites like Pets.com and Webvan and so many others that litter the Silicon Valley graveyard found ways to create at least the appearance of growth. Instead, Twitter continues to drift through the marketplace like a dandelion seed, going where the winds of trend and word-of-mouth and hype take it.

We've certainly seen some interesting deals involving Twitter. Sharing data with Google is intriguing, and TV commercial I saw on our air earlier this morning from mattress maker Tempur-Pedic directing potential customers to Twitter might hold promise, but is that it? Really?

Twitter runs the risk of devolving into another marketing tool by companies looking for what might seem like a cool way to speak to customers. But if that's all it is, I'm not sure how many customers will be left to hear the message. And where's the beef? Where's this company's revenue-generation strategy, or Heaven forbid, profits?

I don't argue that Twitter has a big base of users. I just wonder how many of those 19 million are passionate enough about the service to stick with it beyond its initial attraction as a curiosity. And how many of those 19 million are going to spend some hard-earned scratch on the service, or on those who advertise with it or market through it.

Also, new rounds of venture capital funding do not equal "revenue" growth.

I don't know, but it seems as though Twitter is running the serious risk of so many dot com deaths that came before it: Trying to identify a market for its service after it's already in business, rather than identifying an unmet market need and going after it.

The decline in Twitter usage is more than an irrelevant data point as a kind of snap shot of today's activity without deeper ramifications. The comScore data about Twitter should be watched very carefully, and taken very seriously. I'm not sure how long these guys can last as an independent entity and with numbers like these, its valuation will now be under serious pressure.

Shhhhhh, listen: Here that hissing noise?

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fred
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From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted November 25, 2009 08:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Numbers Games: Putting A Price On Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn

What’s Twitter Inc. worth?

Venture investors valued the social networking start-up at $1.13 billion in its most recent financing round in September. Some holders of common stock think it’s worth even more – $1.3 billion. But NYPPEX LLC, a Greenwich, Conn.-based firm that advises buyers and sellers of private company shares on the secondary market, pegs Twitter’s worth at $474 million based on its paltry revenue. And institutional buyers want a big discount, valuing the company at $135 million.

NYPPEX, which includes these valuations in a report it is releasing to clients Wednesday, also believes Facebook Inc. common stock is overpriced, but not by as much as Twitter’s, while LinkedIn Corp. is somewhat undervalued. “Caveat emptor” clearly should be the motto of anyone venturing into this market. “We believe higher industry standards may be needed for research disclosures and price transparency to protect investors,” NYPPEX says.

Although the federal government imposes limits on who can buy and sell private company stock, there is growing interest in this market as venture firms, founders and employees seek liquidity short of an initial public offering. NYPPEX’s calculations suggest that secondary sellers are overpricing Facebook and Twitter shares, and also raise more doubts about some of the prices paid by venture investors.

Recent odd-lot secondary offers, which are often from employees looking to unload shares, pegged common shares in Twitter at a 173% premium to fair value, NYPPEX says. The firm figured Twitter’s value at $474 million based on estimated 2012 revenue of $105 million, while projecting its revenue for this year at $1.3 million. This puts the common share price at $7.32, well below the $20 that the secondary sellers offered. Investors in the company’s Series E round paid $15.98 per share, but this was for preferred stock, carrying a one-times liquidation preference, which means those shareholders get to recoup their investment before anyone else if the company is sold. Still, the implied valuation of $1.13 billion seems a bit much.

Turning to Facebook, NYPPEX calculated a fair market value of $5.5 billion but said recent odd-lot secondary offers valued the company at $7.6 billion. The May Series E round valued the company at $10 billion, but again, investors got preferred stock with a 1x liquidation preference. That’s still a hefty premium to NYPPEX’s fair value figure, which was based on 2010 estimated revenue of $710 million.

LinkedIn, on the other hand, will have an estimated $205 million in revenue in 2010 yielding a fair-market value of $1.5 billion. Recent odd-lot secondary offers valued the company at less than that – $1.25 billion – so common stock prices could come up a bit, NYPPEX said. LinkedIn’s investors seem more down-to-earth with the June 2008 Series D round yielding an implied valuation of $1.27 billion.

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fred
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From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted January 10, 2010 08:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Twitter hiring workers to turn Tweets into money
By: Reuters | 08 Jan 2010 | 07:12 PM ET
Reuters
| 08 Jan 2010 | 07:12 PM ET

By Alexei Oreskovic

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Twitter, the popular but money-losing microblogging service, is hiring engineers and specialists who can help turn it into a money-maker.

The 2-1/2-year-old Internet start-up, whose short text messages or "tweets" have become a global social phenomenon, is building up a team focused on generating revenue with a new range of yet-to-be launched products, judging by job postings on the company's website.

Among the 26 job openings listed on Twitter's site, four are specifically identified as being devoted to "monetization." Striking licensing deals are key responsibilities for two other jobs.

"Twitter is looking for new members of our technical staff to work on cutting edge monetization projects," several of the postings said.

The move to invest in such projects signals that making money is becoming a bigger priority at Twitter, as it seeks to evolve from being one of the Web's fastest-growing social media firms into a self-sustaining online business.

"The company has crossed into the phase where monetization matters. They're ramping it up," said a source close to Twitter who did not wish to speak on the record about its finances.

A Twitter spokesperson said co-founder Biz Stone was not immediately available for comment. The company has about 120 employees, she said.

Tweets, which are limited to 140 characters, have grown into an established communications medium that has played a key role in world events such as the post-election protests in Iran last summer.

"They know they're here for the long term now, so they need to turn on these monetization engines," said Altimeter Group analyst Jeremiah Owyang.

Twitter, a privately held company, does not report earnings, but its website says: "While our business model is in a research phase, we spend more money than we make."

The company spokesperson did not confirm if that is still accurate.

Twitter struck deals in October -- widely reported to total $25 million -- to license its data feed to Google Inc and Microsoft Corp, allowing tweets to appear within search results on the companies' Internet search engines.

The job postings make it clear that generating revenue beyond the licensing deals is one of the 2010 priorities for Twitter, said Altimeter's Owyang.

Twitter, which recently moved into a larger office space in San Francisco, had 19.4 million unique visitors to its U.S. website in November, according to comScore, up sharply from the 1.5 million visitors a year earlier. Many industry watchers believe the actual number of worldwide Twitter users is much higher, since many people access the service through third-party applications instead of the website.

In September, Twitter raised $100 million in a move that valued the company at $1 billion, according to a person familiar with the matter, from backers including mutual fund giant T. Rowe Price and private equity firm Insight Venture Partners.

Twitter executives have said in the past that the company is interested in offering premium services, such as analytic tools for certain customers, and that it was exploring ways to integrate advertising into the service.

According to the job postings, the company is seeking engineers to build out the infrastructure and front-end features to support monetization systems that include "customer applications and reporting."

A posting for a product marketing manager for monetization said the person would focus on "enhancing business users' understanding of the value of Twitter."

(Reporting by Alexei Oreskovic; Editing by Richard Chang)

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fred
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From:Redmond, WA
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posted April 12, 2010 07:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

Twittering Shakespeare: It's 'Such Tweet Sorrow'
Updated: 4 hours 34 minutes ago
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Dave Thier

Dave Thier Contributor
AOL News
(April 12) -- Most theater companies ask audience members to turn off their cell phones before a show, but a new production of "Romeo and Juliet" from the Royal Shakespeare Company practically requires one.

"Such Tweet Sorrow" is an attempt to tell William Shakespeare's classic story of star-crossed lovers with nothing more than a stream of tweets from its main characters. The show, which unfolds over the next five weeks, places the characters in modern-day London, taking major liberties with the original story as necessary. The tweets also will incorporate audience response and real events to bridge the cyber-gap between actor and audience.

"Our ambition is always to connect people with Shakespeare and bring actors and audiences closer together," Michael Boyd, artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, told the BBC.

One of the early tweets in the production was a link to a YouTube video of Juliet's room that pauses on a photo of her mother, who in this production was killed in a car accident 10 years ago. So far, the story has focused mainly on the Capulets and Mercutio, with no indication of tweets from Romeo.

A character like Juliet is just as excitable as she is in the original text, albeit with slightly different language.

"Omg it's nearly 8am and I'm still in bed!! Time for the quickest shower of my life and to a breakfast in the car haha!! Back soon!!.. X," reads a tweet under the twitter name "julietcap16."

Some purists might lament the intrusion of modern technology into what some perceive as sacred text. In reality, Shakespeare's plays have always changed subject to the whims of 400 years of pop culture and artistic interpretation.

"Romeo and Juliet" in particular has always seemed ripe for adaptation. In recent years, it has been performed as everything from a murder mystery to an ice show to a martial-arts fight. In the original play, the main characters themselves toy with traditional poetic forms and push against notions of propriety in the society they inhabit.

According to Yale University literature professor David Kastan, this rebellious nature of the play has encouraged a tradition of nonconformity.

"In some ways the play itself is about their own resistances to form," he told AOL News. "Partly it's because the main characters themselves are so young, and so we experience them as less formed and less formal."

"Such Tweet Sorrow" is taking place over the next five weeks. While the six actors' flippant medium seems well suited to the youthful exuberance of the first half of the play, Twitter users and theater critics alike will likely wait to see how the production handles the dramatic shift in tone that ends with the death of the main tweeter.

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DavidChang
Director

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From:Toluca Lake, California
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posted May 02, 2010 09:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How do they stay afloat? So much traffic, so little revenue.

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fred
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From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted July 01, 2010 02:14 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Harry Potter fans will not rest until they've out-posted every Twitter-based Twi-hard today — just for meanness’ sake and bragging rights.

"Eclipse," the third film in the book-based sparkly vampire series, premieres at midnight tonight, but it ain't trending.

"Expecto Patronum," "Deathly Hallows" and "OTM Harry Potter" topped Twitter’s world trends earlier today (God, I love a nerd war!) as Potter fans all over the planet joined forces to keep anything pro-Twilight out of the top-10 list. But what does it mean?

Acronym "OTM" has multiple representations — on the move, on the mat, etc. — mostly meant to convey superiority. The full trailer for the movie versions of "The Deathly Hallows," the final book in the Potter series, hit the Web earlier this week.

As for "Expecto Patronum," that's the one wizards use to hold back the joy-draining cold things — "Dementors" in the Potter books, mopey vegan vampires (that look exactly like Cedric Diggory — RIP) on Twitter.

By early afternoon on the East Coast, Twitter seemed to tweak its code in an anti-Potter direction. "OTM Harry Potter" vanished from the list. And I’m sorry, but there is just no way "OTM Harry Potter" fell off completely, usurped by "#canadaday." I think we all know better.

The microblogging site fessed up in the past to tweaking its algorithm to rid the trend list of Justin Bieber-related topics. Has Twitter inadvertently revealed itself to be a Twi-hard? Twi-tter? Technotica placed calls and awaits an answer.

Until then, check for yourself. A click on any of the trending Potter topics reveals tweet after cut-and-paste tweet that reads "Expecto Patronum + OTM Harry Potter + Deathly Hallows + Azkaban = #EclipseFail." While two of the terms in that wizarding equation continue to trend and "OTM Harry Potter" is gone, "#EclipseFail" isn’t there at all.

Meanwhile, as the afternoon wore on, Colby Armstrong, some sort of athletic-type Canadian who plays Canada’s answer to Quidditch or something, inserted himself between "Expecto Patronum" and "Deathly Hallows" to occupy second place on Twitter’s trend list. What’s more, #canadaday still floats around the bottom of the list. Before it’s all over, we may very well learn this is Canada’s dark-horse attempt to rid Twitter of all nerd wars forever.

If that’s the case, look in the mirror, Canada. Look in the mirror.

Ree Hines, Esq., Harry Potterologist and Master of Snapeology, contributed to this report.

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RobinRafe
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posted July 07, 2010 01:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for RobinRafe   Click Here to Email RobinRafe     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
http://www.twitter.com/khanmanka

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fred
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Posts: 8210
From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted December 16, 2010 09:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Twitter has raised a massive new round of funding led by new investor Kleiner Perkins, as it continues its speedy growth. Kara Swisher at AllThingsD puts the size of the investment, which Twitter isn’t disclosing right now, at $200 million. The valuation is a reported $3.7 billion, more than triple the $1 billion valuation the site last raised money at a year ago.

This funding round was hotly contested with both Kleiner Perkins and Digital Sky Technologies competing to invest in the microblogging service. Late last month, TechCrunch reported that Kleiner Perkins, which has missed out on investing in some of the web’s other recent success stories, was the likely winner.

Twitter isn’t offering any specifics on what it is going to do with the new influx of cash, which brings its total funding to date to $405 million, simply saying that the “additional resources and expertise will be extremely helpful as Twitter continues to grow as a company and business.”

Since raising $100 million in a funding round last September, the company has expanded dramatically, making a series of acquisitions, introducing an ad platform, and redesigning its site in an effort to get more people to use it. The company now has 350 employees, up from 130 a year ago.

Along with the funding, Twitter is adding former Tellme Networks CEO Mike McCue and former DoubleClick CEO David Rosenblatt to its board. Twitter’s existing investors include mutual fund giant T. Rowe Price, Insight Venture Partners, Spark Capital, Institutional Venture Partners, and Union Square Ventures.

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DavidChang
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posted February 16, 2011 11:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yesterday, Twitter CEO Dick Costolo dismissed the company’s $10 billion acquisition rumors during a speech at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. And today, Twitter co-founder and creative director Biz Stone told NPR that “We’re not valued at $10 billion dollars.”

The Wall Street Journal recently reported that Twitter is in low-level acquisition talks with Facebook and Google for a deal that would put the network at a $8 to $10 billion valuation. Stone tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross, “We’re not valued at $10 billion dollars. That’s just what people are writing in the newspapers, which unfortunately has the negative impact of my friends thinking I must have $10 billion dollars.”

Of course, the $8 billion to $10 billion are just numbers being thrown out there (perhaps by overeager bankers?). Twitter’s valuation wouldn’t change until a deal is actually done. Just last December, the company was reportedly valued at $3.7 billion during its most recent funding round.

But when Gross asked him about the acquisition rumors he responded “Twitter is not for sale. We don’t have a shingle out on our front that says ‘Twitter. For Sale.’ We’re not for sale and we haven’t been. We’re very, very interested in building an independent company. “

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fred
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From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted April 01, 2011 11:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good primer on learning how to Tweet.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/31/quick-twitter-tips-a-twitter-guide-for-beginners_n_843351.html#s258985&title=Learn_The_Lingo

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DavidChang
Director

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From:Toluca Lake, California
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posted April 04, 2011 10:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Top 25 Newspapers on Twitter -- Who's Up, Who's Down
Published: April 04, 2011 @ 7:03 pm

Last fall, the blog Journalistics published a list [1] ranking the top 25 newspapers on Twitter, based on their follower counts. (TheWrap followed up with a similar list for magazines [2].)

I figured it's time we update the newspaper list, to see how the troubled print industry has fared -- and at what pace the audience for their tweets is growing.

At 3,062,437, the New York Times remains the only American newspaper with more than a million followers. The Chicago Tribune, at 829,742, is number two, followed by the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post and Los Angeles Times.

In terms of growth, both the San Francisco Chronicle and New York Newsday more than doubled their follower counts in the five months since the initial list was compiled. (The Chronicle, with 21,075 followers, is up 121.6 percent, Newsday 118 percent.) The Washington Post, with 88 percent growth, added more than 180,000 followers.

The New York Times, perhaps a victim of its own early Twitter success, grew its number of followers by just 15 percent -- the smallest growth rate of any newspaper included here.

A few other things to note:

>> The follower counts were taken between 3 and 4 p.m. ET on Thursday.

>> I used the official Twitter feeds for each publication, and did not include related section or blog feeds (the New York Times, for example, has several) or popular columnists (the Times' David Carr, with 309,706 followers [3], would rank as the fifth most-followed American newspaper on Twitter just by himself).

>> I did not include the follower count for The Daily, Rupert Murdoch's iPad "newspaper" (it's 22,072 [4]).

>> I limited it to U.S. newspapers.

* When Journalistics compiled its initial list, it used the @chicagotribune [5] Twitter feed's follower count, which was 34,490 last October. (Now that feed has 45,299 followers.) The paper also operates the vastly more popular @ColonelTribune [6] account, which bills itself as "a more gentlemanly version" of the Tribune's eponymous feed.

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