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Author Topic:   Video Games
HollywoodProducer
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From:La Canada
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posted May 07, 2008 05:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No Games topic. Video games are huge now. GTA just made $500 million... in one week!

Take-Two says sales of 'Grand Theft Auto IV' top $500 million in 1st week
"Grand Theft Auto IV" raked in more than $500 million in its first week in stores, selling more than 6 million units worldwide, the video game's publisher said Wednesday. The highly anticipated title from Take-Two Interactive Software Inc. has received stellar ratings along with criticism for its violent content. The game follows Eastern European immigrant-turned gangster Niko Bellic on crime missions around a fictional Liberty City. The title sold about 3.6 million units on April 29, its opening day, bringing in roughly $310 million. This is $10 million more than what Microsoft Corp.'s "Halo 3," another blockbuster game, took in during its first week last fall. The game has lifted sales of Microsoft's Xbox 360 and Sony Corp.'s PlayStation 3, the two consoles for which it is available. Without giving numbers, Microsoft said Xbox 360 sales jumped 54 percent in the week following the title's launch, compared with the prior week, and more than 2.3 million people played it on its Xbox Live online service. "Retailers say roughly four out of every 10 Xbox 360 consoles sold also included the sale of a copy of 'Grand Theft Auto IV,'" said Aaron Greenberg, director of product management at Xbox 360 and Xbox Live. Sony spokeswoman Laura Bakken said the company's 10 largest retailers have "all seen a pretty substantial lift" in PS3 sales, but she did not give specifics. New York-based Take-Two is the subject of a $2 billion hostile buyout from larger rival Electronic Arts Inc., which Take-Two has repeatedly rebuffed as too low. (AP)

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fred
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posted May 07, 2008 05:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
OK, but every time we try, nobody talks about it.

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DavidChang
Director

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From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted May 08, 2008 09:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Manka Bros. is in this space as well. We just released our Manka Gaming System 4.6 - we're waiting for developers to make games for this platform. Grand Theft Auto would be a real boost for the console.

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jpgordo
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Posts: 2957
From:Studio City, CA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted May 08, 2008 01:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jpgordo   Click Here to Email jpgordo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm looking forward to Lego Batman.

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indiedan
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From:Santa Monica
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posted May 08, 2008 01:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
'Auto' Outpaces Hollywood Blockbusters


In its first week in the stores, Grand Theft Auto IV took in more than $500 million, more than any movie in history has made in its first week. Opening-day sales of the game on April 29 came to $310 million, breaking the record of $300 million set by Microsoft's Halo 3 last year. In a statement, Strauss Zelnick, chairman of Take-Two, which distributes GTA-IV, and the former president of 20th Century Fox film studio, said, "We believe these retail sales levels surpass any movie or music launch to date. This signals just how important interactive entertainment has become in entertainment writ large."

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fred
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posted May 10, 2008 11:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It seems like the message boards have picked up lately. That's good. I always like Manka boards... here's a story about gamer geeks and the Nobel Prize.

Computer Game's High Score Could Earn The Nobel Prize In Medicine


Screen shot from the computer game Foldit. The player twists the protein and pulls its arms to move it into its most stable position, which is the shape it would take in nature. He earns the title "H-bond master" for forming new hydrogen bonds; "clash clear expert" for avoiding conflicting electrically charged side chains; and "packing expert" for wrangling the protein into a more compact shape. (Credit: Image courtesy of University of Washington)ScienceDaily (May 9, 2008) — Gamers have devoted countless years of collective brainpower to rescuing princesses or protecting the planet against alien invasions. This week researchers at the University of Washington will try to harness those finely honed skills to make medical discoveries, perhaps even finding a cure for HIV.

A new game, named Foldit, turns protein folding into a competitive sport. Introductory levels teach the rules, which are the same laws of physics by which protein strands curl and twist into three-dimensional shapes -- key for biological mysteries ranging from Alzheimer's to vaccines.

After about 20 minutes of training, people feel like they're playing a video game but are actually mouse-clicking in the name of medical science. The free program is at http://fold.it/.

The game was developed by doctoral student Seth Cooper and postdoctoral researcher Adrien Treuille, both in computer science and engineering, working with Zoran Popovic, a UW associate professor of computer science and engineering; David Baker, a UW professor of biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator; and David Salesin, a UW professor of computer science and engineering. Professional game designers provided advice during the game's creation.

"We're hopefully going to change the way science is done, and who it's done by," said Popovic, who presented the project today at the Games for Health meeting in Baltimore. "Our ultimate goal is to have ordinary people play the game and eventually be candidates for winning the Nobel Prize."

Proteins, of which there are more than 100,000 different kinds in the human body, form every cell, make up the immune system and set the speed of chemical reactions. We know many proteins' genetic sequence, but don't know how they fold up into complex shapes whose nooks and crannies play crucial biological roles.

Computer simulators calculate all possible protein shapes, but this is a mathematical problem so huge that all the computers in the world would take centuries to solve it. In 2005, Baker developed a project named Rosetta@home that taps into volunteers' computer time all around the world. But even 200,000 volunteers aren't enough.

"There are too many possibilities for the computer to go through every possible one," Baker said. "An approach like Rosetta@home does well on small proteins, but as the protein gets bigger and bigger it gets harder and harder, and the computers often fail.

"People, using their intuition, might be able to home in on the right answer much more quickly."

Rosetta@home and Foldit both use the Rosetta protein-folding software. Foldit is the first protein-folding project that asks volunteers for something other than unused processor cycles on their computers or Playstation machines. Foldit also differs from recent human-computer interactive games that use humans' ability to recognize images or interpret text. Instead, Foldit capitalizes on people's natural 3-D problem-solving skills.

The intuitive skills that make someone good at playing Foldit are not necessarily the ones that make a top biologist. Baker says his 13-year-old son is faster at folding proteins than he is. Others may be even faster.

"I imagine that there's a 12-year-old in Indonesia who can see all this in their head," Baker says.

Eventually, the researchers hope to advance science by discovering protein-folding prodigies who have natural abilities to see proteins in 3-D.

"Some people are just able to look at the game and in less than two minutes, get to the top score," said Popovic. "They can't even explain what they're doing, but somehow they're able to do it."

The game looks like a 21st-century version of Tetris, with multicolored geometric snakes filling the screen. A team that includes a half-dozen UW graduate and undergraduate students spent more than a year figuring out how to make the game both accurate and engaging. They faced some special challenges that commercial game developers don't encounter.

"We don't know what the best result is, so we can't help people or hint people toward that goal," Popovic explained. The team also couldn't arbitrarily decide to make one move worth 1,000 bonus points, since the score corresponds to the energy needed to hold the protein in that shape.

Almost 1,000 players have tested the system in recent weeks, playing informal challenges using proteins with known shapes. Starting this week, however, the developers will open the game to the public and offer proteins of unknown shapes. Also starting this week, Foldit gamers will face off against research groups around the world in a major protein-structure competition held every two years.

Beginning in the fall, Foldit problems will expand to involve creating new proteins that we might wish existed -- enzymes that could break up toxic waste, for example, or that would absorb carbon dioxide from the air. Computers alone cannot design a protein from scratch. The game lets the computer help out when it's a simple optimization problem -- the same way that computer solitaire sometimes moves the cards to clean up the table -- letting the player concentrate on interesting moves.

Eventually, the researchers hope to present a medical nemesis, such as HIV or malaria, and challenge players to devise a protein with just the right shape to lock into the virus and deactivate it. Winning protein designs will be synthesized in Baker's lab and tested in petri dishes. High-scoring players will be credited in scientific publications the way that top Rosetta@home contributors already are credited for their computer time.

"Long-term, I'm hoping that we can get a significant fraction of the world's population engaged in solving critical problems in world health, and doing it collaboratively and successfully through the game," Baker said. "We're trying to use the brain power of people all around the world to advance biomedical research."

Foldit includes elements of multiplayer games in which people can team up, chat with other players and create online profiles. Over time the researchers will analyze people's moves to see how the top players solve puzzles. This information will be fed back into the game's design so the game's tools and format can evolve.

The research is funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Microsoft Corp. and Adobe Systems Inc., and through fellowships at Nvidia Corp. and Intel Corp.

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HollywoodProducer
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posted May 14, 2008 08:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
EA Posts Wider Loss on Charges
Electronic Arts Inc. swung to a wider net loss on acquisition- and investment-related charges in its fiscal fourth quarter, while an accounting change and strong sales of titles like Rock Band boosted revenue 84% at the videogames publisher. The results from EA, of Redwood City, Calif., suggest that a makeover of the company begun last year by new CEO John Riccitiello is only partially complete. After several years of little or no growth, Mr. Riccitiello restructured the company to improve its game-making operations and acquired an outside game developer, Bioware Pandemic, to broaden its portfolio of games. While sales are now growing at a brisk pace, EA has yet to deliver equivalent bottom-line performance as it struggles with some of the highest development costs in the industry, analysts say. "On balance, we're very pleased with our revenue growth, but not yet happy with our profit margins," Mr. Riccitiello said in a statement. EA's growing headcount helped boost costs. For the fiscal period ended March 31, EA said it had 9,037 employees, up 14% from 7,893 in the same period the prior year. "They're employing more people to get this revenue, but they're not getting as much leverage," says Evan Wilson, an analyst at Pacific Crest Securities. Still, EA is on the verge of what could be an exceptionally strong year, with a slate of eagerly awaited titles like Spore, a new game from Will Wright, the creator of the Sims franchise that has sold more than 100 million copies over its history. EA also plans to release an online fantasy game called Warhammer that will compete with World of Warcraft, a highly lucrative online game owned by Vivendi SA's games division. For the current fiscal year that ends March 31, 2009, EA says it expects to boost its annual revenue by $1 billion and to double its operating profit because of its stronger lineup of titles. Those figures don't include any financial benefits from buying Take-Two Interactive Software Inc., the New York-based publisher of Grand Theft Auto IV that EA is seeking to take over in a $2 billion hostile bid. Take-Two has resisted EA's offer, seeking a better price. A tender offer by EA to Take-Two shareholders is set to expire Friday. EA shares fell nearly 3% in after-hours trading following the news. The stock traded at $54.57, up 30 cents, at 4 p.m. on the Nasdaq Stock Market, sliding to $53 following the announcement. EA said its net loss for the quarter was $94 million, or 30 cents a share, compared with a loss of $25 million, or eight cents a share, in the same period a year ago. The results reflected a $138 million expense related to the acquisition of Bioware Pandemic and a more than $100 million loss stemming from EA's investments in two Asian game companies. For the full year, EA lost $454 million, down from net income of $76 million the prior year. Revenue for the fiscal fourth quarter was $1.13 billion, up from $613 million during the same period the prior year. For the full fiscal year, EA said it had $3.67 billion in revenue, up 19% from $3.09 billion the prior year. For the fiscal year ending next March, EA forecast revenue of between $4.9 billion and $5.15 billion. It forecast earnings for the year of between 25 cents a share and 52 cents a share. (WSJ)

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HollywoodProducer
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posted May 15, 2008 05:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
U.S. game sales rise 47 pct in April on Grand Theft Auto 4
U.S. sales of video game hardware and software rose 47 percent from a year earlier, as Take-Two Interactive Software Inc's "Grand Theft Auto 4" and Nintendo's Wii console stole the show. The popularity of "Grand Theft Auto 4," however, failed to boost sales of Microsoft's Xbox 360 and and Sony's PlayStation 3, which both saw unit shipments fall sharply from the previous month. U.S. consumers bought 188,000 Xbox 360s and 187,000 PS3s in April, data from market research firm NPD showed on Thursday. That was down from 262,000 units and 257,000 units in March. "The Easter shift from April to March this year I think had an impact on sales during the month," said Lazard Capital analyst Colin Sebastian. "I know on hardware side it was a little light but let's see what a month of 'GTA' sales does for those platforms as well as a month without a holiday shift," Sebastian said. "Grand Theft Auto 4" launched on April 29 and sold nearly 2.9 million copies in the United States in its first five days, NPD said. Because the criminal action game can only be played on those two systems, Microsoft and Sony were counting on the title to convince those who haven't bought a new gaming system to now seize the opportunity. "It was surprising not to see bigger hardware sales for the Xbox 360 and the PS3 given the release of GTA IV," NPD analyst Anita Frazier wrote in the report. "However, since the game was only in the market for 5 days during this reporting period, that sales lift could very well be evident in May data." Meanwhile, Nintendo's Wii juggernaut rolled on, selling more than 714,000 units in a sign of unabated demand for the slim white box and its friendly, simpler games. Gamers bought more than 1.1 million copies of Nintendo's cartoony racing game "Mario Kart Wii," which was the No. 2 game in the month. "We are quite excited about the strong launch of 'Mario Kart Wii," Cammie Dunaway, executive vice president of sales and marketing for Nintendo of America, told Reuters. "It is a broad appeal that brings in a diverse audience." (Reuters)

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HollywoodProducer
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posted May 19, 2008 05:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Electronic Arts again extends deadline for $2 billion Take-Two offer
Video game publisher Electronic Arts Inc. has for a third time extended the deadline for its $2 billion tender offer to buy smaller rival Take-Two Interactive Software Inc., but it did not raise the price as many analysts had expected. Take-Two again spurned the offer price as too low while saying it has "begun the process" of formally talking to interested parties. EA is the only company that has publicly expressed interest in buying Take-Two and analysts aren't xpecting another suitor to come forward. Redwood City, Calif.-based EA said Monday it is extending the offer, which had expired Friday, to June 16 at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The price remains $25.74 per share although Take-Two's stock has not traded below $26 since May 1. Analysts, such as Wedbush Morgan's Michael Pachter, expect EA to end up paying about a couple of dollars more per share to get the deal done. As of Friday, about 6.2 million shares had been tendered, representing about 8 percent of Take-Two's outstanding shares. This is slightly below the roughly 6.4 million shares that had been tendered as of April 17, the day before EA last extended the deadline. EA said the latest extension allows the Federal Trade Commission's antitrust review of the proposed acquisition to continue. New York-based Take-Two is best known for its "Grand Theft Auto" series of games. The latest installment of the popular franchise sold 6 million copies worldwide in its first week on sale, bringing in more than $500 million and making it the most lucrative video game launch in history. Take-Two said the "GTA IV" launch, as well as a recently announced movie deal for its critically acclaimed "BioShock" game, shows the company is worth more money than what EA is offering. EA, meanwhile, says its offer already takes the success of "GTA IV" into account. Earlier this month, EA, whose games include the "Madden NFL" football franchise and "The Sims," gave an outlook below Wall Street's expectations for the current fiscal year, suggesting it could use Take-Two's titles to boost its performance. Take-Two urged shareholders to reject the offer. "The small number of shares tendered into EA's offer to date demonstrates that our stockholders agree with what our board has maintained from the beginning: EA's proposal undervalues our company," said Chief Executive Ben Feder in a statement. In another sign it is serious about going through with the offer, EA earlier this month disclosed it has secured debt financing commitments of up to $1 billion for the proposed acquisition. Take-Two's shares fell 19 cents to $26.91 and EA's shares dropped $1.17 to $48.43. (AP)

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HollywoodProducer
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posted May 20, 2008 10:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Fans Resist End of Virtual Disneyland
Created to Celebrate
50th Anniversary,
Free Game to Shut
By PETER SANDERS

For Walt Disney Co., the task of opening a virtual version of Disneyland on the Web was relatively easy. Closing it, though, is proving to be quite a bit more difficult, thanks to the wrath of obsessive fans of Disney's theme parks.


Virtual Magic Kingdom

This screen allows Virtual Magic Kingdom's gamers to build an avatar they can play with.

In conjunction with the 50th anniversary of Disneyland in 2005, Walt Disney launched a free online game called Virtual Magic Kingdom whose look and layout mimics Disneyland's. Users created avatars and explored the online park's various regions, such as Tomorrowland and Main Street; chatted with other users; and participated in online promotions that crossed over into real-life activities at the company's resorts in California and Florida.

Disney's notoriously obsessive fans got deeply into this. Using their online personas, fans of Virtual Magic Kingdom -- VMK to aficionados -- accumulated points by playing games and completing tasks inside the world. These points could then be used to buy in-game objects like animated hats, pins and furniture to decorate their virtual private rooms. Points could also be accumulated in the real world through purchases of Disney movie DVDs and the like.

When players tired of the online world, they could keep playing VMK as they visited Disney's theme parks. There, they could go on scavenger hunts tailored specifically to them -- and use their rewards to purchase special Virtual Magic Kingdom items that increased their status among fellow gamers.

On Wednesday night, however, Disney plans to throw everyone out of VMK and lock the gates -- erasing their online profiles, lives and collections of virtual trinkets and real estate. Disney says it never intended the 50th-anniversary promotion to run this long, but money is also a factor: Virtual Magic Kingdom is free, and full access to Disney's other online game sites -- like Club Penguin and Toontown -- costs as much as $9.95 a month in the case of Toontown.


Disney's plan to close its free Virtual Magic Kingdom game (top) prompted some fans to protest recently.

This has unleashed a loud outcry from VMK patrons, and some of them are throwing themselves in front of Disney's virtual wrecking ball. One slick Web site created to help save VMK has gathered nearly 20,000 signatures on its online petition, while blogs maintained by the Disney faithful continue to decry the company's move. A real-life protest to sway the Burbank, Calif., entertainment company's thinking largely fizzled, though. Only about a dozen die-hard fans picketed outside Disneyland's main gates on May 10, carrying placards and a banner riffing Disney's "Year of a Million Dreams" campaign that read, "Year of a Million Broken Dreams."

Disney says VMK's life extended well beyond what was supposed to be a roughly 18-month celebration of the theme parks. "We never want to disappoint a guest at any time, but in this particular case, we said this was a great product and it was extended due to popular demand, and we had to take this action to move forward with our portfolio of franchised products," says John Spelich, a spokesman for Disney's Internet Group.

The situation shows how sticky things can get when free, nonrevenue-generating gimmicks blossom into hits. In 2006, Disney boasted that one million avatars had been created inside VMK, though the company declines to say how many users the site actually has (individuals can create multiple characters). The site, which operates from 7 a.m. until 10 p.m. Pacific time, still boasts a few thousand daily users.

Disney says that despite fan interest, VMK's popularity is dwarfed by that of its other games, including "Club Penguin" and the "Disney Fairies" Web game based on Tinker Bell. Since the Fairies site was launched in January 2007, users have created close to six million avatars there, the company says. The game still isn't fully operational and so far is free, but Disney plans to start charging a fee for portions of the game later this year.

Virtual Magic Kingdom shows that Disney's games aren't just for kids. To be sure, it attracts children, whose parents are drawn to the family-friendly alternative to very adult virtual worlds like Second Life. VMK users can only "chat" using words from an approved dictionary; numerals, names and email addresses are forbidden; and anyone trying to circumvent the rules using clever word substitutions is warned or kicked off the site by moderators.

But many of VMK's users are adults who just happen to love Disney. Such fans can be vocal and dogged when things don't go their way. In 2004, they were instrumental in rallying behind former board member Roy Disney's attack on the leadership of then-Disney Chief Executive Michael Eisner.

Nicholas Bourne, a 22-year-old student, is a longtime Disneyland fan who says he visits the park about once a week using his annual pass. Now, he is one of the forces behind a Web site, www.savevmktoday.com. Mr. Bourne found the game the first week it appeared online in May 2005 and got hooked fast. He says he spends two to three hours a day there, largely chatting with friends. But his investment of time and interest also allowed him to become a "Community Leader," responsible for helping other members and organizing events.

Mr. Bourne latched onto VMK after being unsatisfied with other online games like EverQuest, which he felt was not only too expensive because of its monthly fee, but also too intense. "I really just liked VMK's environment and how it not only recreated elements of the theme parks, like Splash Mountain, but also had this great interactive element that allowed you to create your own version," he says.

As they face eviction from their favorite game, some Virtual Magic Kingdom residents are preparing to move on. "I've been playing for almost two years, and I've made really good friends and had really good times," says 13-year-old Grant Hale of Naugatuck, Conn. "I was really sad and really mad when I found out they were closing VMK." His family is grudgingly preparing to renew its subscription to Club Penguin, which it had planned to cancel.

Write to Peter Sanders at peter.sanders@wsj.com

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DavidChang
Director

Posts: 882
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted May 24, 2008 09:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
?

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indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8475
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posted July 15, 2008 01:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Netflix Movies To Debut On Xbox

15 July 2008 10:38 AM, PDT

The 10.3 million owners of Microsoft's Xbox 360 video game player will be able to use it to stream thousands of movies from Netflix, the video "rentailer," the two companies announced in Los Angeles on Monday. Beginning this fall, Netflix subscribers will be able to stream 10,000 movies and television shows onto their TV sets using the Xbox 360 device. Currently Netflix's online streaming service works only with PCs, unless subscribers buy a $100 converter box. The announcement came just one day after Microsoft announced that it was cutting the price of its 20Gb game player to $300

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N F S I 2
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posted July 28, 2008 09:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for N F S I 2   Click Here to Email N F S I 2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wahlberg Refuses To Play Addictive Video Game

28 July 2008 12:01 AM, PDT

Mark Wahlberg has never played popular video game Max Payne - despite starring in the big screen adaptation of the iconic computer hit.

The actor will play the game's title character in the upcoming move version due out in October, but won't buy the game because he has an addictive personality.

And the star insists it wouldn't be fair on his family to spend all his time in front of the computer enjoying a virtual world.

He tells People.com, "I didn't want to play because I have an addictive personality.

"I got more responsibility now than I've ever had with the kids and everything else. I don't want to be spending 14 hours on the videogame and then eight hours on the set. It's not going to work out."

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HollywoodProducer
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Posts: 2815
From:La Canada
Registered: Jun 2000

posted September 08, 2008 05:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Next Harry Potter game delayed, just like the movie

Warner Bros.’ decision to delay the next film in the Harry Potter franchise from November to summer 2009 has already shaken up the fall movie schedule. Now the move is affecting the video game industry. Electronic Arts said today it would delay the release of its game based on the sixth Potter film, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince," a title it expects to bring in $120 million in revenue and 13 cents per share in profit. Although the decision had been widely expected since Warner Bros. rescheduled the movie in August, EA shares fell 1.2% to $45.94 on a day when the major stock indexes surged. Originally set to debut Nov. 21, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" was shifted to July 17 to bolster Warner Bros.’ schedule for the lucrative summer season. The decision came in the wake of the Hollywood writers strike that has prompted studios to reconsider release dates and the strong box-office performance this summer of "The Dark Knight," which will leave Warner Bros. facing tough revenue comparisons next year. Analyst Michael Pachter of Wedbush Morgan Securities, who rates EA a "strong buy," said the stock market "way overreacted" to today's news. "What’s the difference whether they make that 13 cents a share this year or next year?" said Pachter, whose company does not perform investment banking business for EA. "It's not like they're saying it was a badly designed game or there was a major production glitch."

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indiedan
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Posts: 8475
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted November 17, 2008 01:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Movie Videogame Company Collapses

17 November 2008 1:38 AM, PST

A Hollywood-based videogame company that specialized in making games based on movies, TV shows, and even the Six Flags amusement-park rides, closed down Friday, after a year and a half of poor sales, according to reports appearing in Daily Variety and the Los Angeles Times. The company, Brash Entertainment, which launched just 18 months ago, had forged deals with Lionsgate, 20th Century Fox, Universal, Vanguard Animation, and Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. In reporting the company's demise, the Times observed that it "underscores the difficulties of making videogames on a Hollywood time frame. Feature films take less than a year to shoot, edit and release. But video games can take two or more years to develop." On its home page, Brash links to a news article in the Wall Street Journal that appeared shortly after its launch. It was headlined: "A Start-Up's Risky Niche: Movie-based Videogames."

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