Manka Bros. Studios - Home
  Manka Bros. Message Boards
  Show BUSINESS
  Comcast Universal (Page 1)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

UBBFriend: Email This Page to Someone!
This topic is 2 pages long:   1  2 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Comcast Universal
HollywoodProducer
A-List Writer

Posts: 2747
From:La Canada
Registered: Jun 2000

posted October 01, 2010 02:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I suppose there should be a new topic to reflect the soon to be new name.

IP: Logged

fred
A-List Writer

Posts: 8161
From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted October 08, 2010 04:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I see there's a little glitch. Something to do with programming arbitration.

IP: Logged

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 700
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted December 22, 2010 01:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Looks like Jeff Zucker will still be running NBC Universal (NYSE: GE) when the new year rolls around.

Comcast (NSDQ: CMCSA) and NBCU told their transition teams today that the continuing regulatory look into the proposed merger between the largest U.S. cable operator and the GE media unit makes closing the deal by Dec. 31 unlikely.

Despite considerable objection, including from the very vocal Sen. Al Franken, the merger still appears to be on track for approval but it also likely will come with strings attached designed to protect consumers from the consolidation. Comcast spokeswoman Sena Fitzmaurice said via e-mail that the company believes DOJ and the FCC “continue to make substantial progress toward approval ... However because of the lead time required to prepare for a close, it now appears that we will not be able to close the transaction with GE relating to NBC Universal by year-end.”

As a result, the companies are backing off a year-end closing, instead looking towards an as-yet-unidentified date in January. The delay leaves NBCU in a kind of active limbo, with Zucker and Jeff Gaspin, the chairman of NBCU Television Entertainment, continuing to operate and planning departures at the same time. It also keeps Comcast COO Steve Burke, who will head the merged unit, from implementing the plans he’s already outlined for a new NBCU executive structure. It also leaves an air of uncertainty about regulatory approval and the form it might take if it comes through.

The NYT, which first reported the delay, says the FCC order could start to circulate later this week.

IP: Logged

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 700
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted December 25, 2010 09:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
WASHINGTON — The head of the Federal Communications Commission is proposing regulatory conditions to ensure that cable TV giant Comcast Corp. cannot stifle competition in the video market once it takes control of NBC Universal.

The conditions laid out Thursday by FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski are intended to guarantee that satellite providers and other rival television services can still carry marquee NBC programming and that new Internet video distributors can get the content they need to grow and compete.

Comcast's takeover of NBC Universal could have profound consequences for the nascent market for Internet video – a market that could eat into Comcast's core cable TV business if enough consumers drop their cable subscriptions in favor of low-cost alternatives online.

Genachowski wants to ensure that Comcast won't be able to use its control over NBC's vast media empire to withhold content from emerging online competitors such as Netflix Inc., Amazon.com Inc. and Apple Inc. – locking consumers into costly monthly cable bills to get access to a wide range of popular programming.

Genachowski now needs at least two of the other four FCC commissioners to back his proposal, and he is likely to make modifications to win the support he needs to cap off the yearlong regulatory review.

The FCC is expected to approve the deal, with conditions, early next year.

The deal also faces scrutiny at the Justice Department, which has been working closely with the FCC and is likely to impose conditions similar to whatever the FCC ultimately approves, subject to its own ability to enforce them under antitrust laws.

Comcast suggested that it could accept what it believes to be in Genachowski's proposal. In a statement, the company said the proposal would ensure that the deal delivers "real public interest benefits" and "enable us to operate the NBC Universal and legacy Comcast businesses in an appropriate way."

Comcast is seeking government approval to buy a 51 percent stake in NBC Universal from General Electric Co. for $13.8 billion in cash and assets.

IP: Logged

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 700
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted January 02, 2011 03:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Late January?

IP: Logged

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 700
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted January 04, 2011 09:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This week.

IP: Logged

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 700
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted January 05, 2011 08:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here’s a logical, and cool, marriage between your iPad and your TV, brokered by Comcast: The cable company says it will let subscribers stream live TV to their tablets later this year.

The catch here is that the capability, which will be offered on Apple’s iPad as well as tablets running Google’s Android, will only work inside subscribers’ homes.

So you still can’t watch a live episode of “Two and a Half Men” on your iPad in the airport, but you will be able to watch it in your kitchen, while your better half watches “Frontline” in the living room. Or whatever.

It’s worth noting that Verizon announced its own version of this feature (with the same limitations), for its FiOS TV subscribers last summer, but has yet to roll it out.

Comcast will be demoing the feature later today at a Citigroup investors conference, but won’t be providing details about timing, or if there will be any programming restrictions on what you can watch on your tablet.

It’s possible there could be some holdouts, but the cable giant ought to be able to offer just about everything, since there’s no issue with carriage rights or ad loads, etc.–tablet watchers will be watching whatever’s already on live TV.

The killer feature, of course, would be the ability to do this on-the-go, but we’re not there yet, and it may take awhile to get there. Mobile rights for video–especially live video–are a whole different ball game.

Meantime, though, Comcast is offering a half-step–as previously promised, it will let traveling iPad users start to watch a selection of on-demand content, via its Xfinity TV app.

Comcast says it will offer some 3,000 TV shows and movies that iPad users can watch on-demand, over any network–AT&T’s 3G, or Time Warner Cable’s broadband, or whatever. Once that feature is up and running, which should be shortly, we’ll be able to compare that catalog to the ones that Netflix and Hulu Plus are offering for $7.99 a month.

And that’s the big picture here: Comcast and the other big cable providers, which continue to insist that cord-cutting isn’t real, want to make sure that it doesn’t become a reality, by offering their subscribers access to as much stuff, in as many places, as they can. It’s going to take years to find out whether that works or not, but best to start experimenting ASAP.

IP: Logged

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 700
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted January 07, 2011 09:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No announcement.

IP: Logged

HollywoodProducer
A-List Writer

Posts: 2747
From:La Canada
Registered: Jun 2000

posted January 13, 2011 05:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HollywoodProducer   Click Here to Email HollywoodProducer     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hand-Wringing in Comcast-NBC Deal; Media Companies Fret Over Proposed Rule Requiring Cable Giant to Offer Content to Any Online Service Working With Rivals (WSJ complete)
Major media companies are raising concerns that government conditions on Comcast Corp.'s impending deal to acquire control of NBC Universal from General Electric Co. could put them at a disadvantage in future negotiations to shape the burgeoning online video market.
At issue is a condition proposed by the Federal Communications Commission that would require Comcast to offer NBC programming to any online video service that has reached a similar deal for content from at least one of NBC's competitors, such as Walt Disney Co. or News Corp.

Lobbyists for both Disney and News Corp., along with Time Warner Inc. Chief Executive Jeff Bewkes, have been voicing their concerns this week with the FCC, worried that such conditions could undermine their own efforts to profit from the nascent online video industry. News Corp. owns The Wall Street Journal.

People familiar with the matter say the media companies are concerned that the rules would interfere with their own negotiations with online providers like Netflix Inc. or Apple Inc. and could have a range of unknown consequences for their business.

Such a condition might also lessen their control over how the online video market evolves, making it harder for them to reserve their content for particular services. It would also mean that Time Warner or Disney couldn't try out a new video platform without knowing that the service's owner would also get NBC content, and it could make it easier for Internet video services to acquire content, making them more formidable challengers to cable and satellite companies.

Some opponents of the condition have suggested setting the bar higher and requiring online video providers to reach content deals with two or more NBC competitors, according to the people close to the negotiations.

During a Tuesday phone call, Time Warner's Mr. Bewkes and FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski discussed online programming and the importance of allowing "nascent online video models" to evolve "in a way that supports the creation of high quality programming," according to a federal filing.

Disney's lobbyist "expressed concern with any merger conditions that may be dependent on or that would affect the marketplace negotiations of independent third parties," according to an FCC filing released Thursday.

Comcast resisted the conditions in months of talks with the agency, but says it can live with the proposal. "We continue to believe the draft FCC order as circulated ensures public interest benefits and will enable us to operate the NBC Universal and legacy Comcast businesses in an appropriate way," said David L. Cohen, Comcast's executive vice president in a statement.

The Justice Department is also expected to impose conditions on Comcast to protect competition in the online video marketplace. Public interest groups have raised concerns that a combined Comcast could unfairly deny online video rivals NBC or Comcast programming in the future or hurt the ability of consumers to dump traditional cable service in favor of online rivals.

Comcast is the largest U.S. residential broadband provider. It offers an online video service called Xfinity, which allows its subscribers to watch cable programming online, and will gain NBC's stake in the online video service Hulu LLC after the transaction is completed.

The media giants may just be worried about how this condition could impact the evolving online video marketplace and the idea of the government getting involved, said Rebecca Arbogast, a telecom analyst for Stifel Nicolaus. "It's this unknown factor that they can't predict," she said.

FCC officials are trying to wind up their review of the Comcast-NBC deal this month. The Justice Department must also weigh in.

Many of the FCC's conditions would last seven years, which is somewhat longer than normal. A few conditions would expire earlier, including a three-year requirement that Comcast offer stand-alone Internet service to consumers for $49.95 a month.

The FCC's two Republican members are expected to support the deal, but they are reportedly concerned about a condition requiring Comcast to adhere to recently adopted "net neutrality" rules on Internet lines which would bar broadband providers from deliberately slowing or blocking data. Comcast would be required to abide by net neutrality rules for seven years even if the rules are subsequently overturned by a federal appeals court.

Comcast hasn't raised major objections to the net neutrality conditions and if the company agreed to voluntarily abide by net neutrality rules, the FCC might be able to drop them as a formal condition, according to people close to the negotiations.

IP: Logged

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 700
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted February 07, 2011 04:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So far the industry hasn't changed.

IP: Logged

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 700
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted April 19, 2011 09:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Salil Mehta has been promoted to the newly created position of Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer of NBCUniversal's Entertainment & Digital Networks and Integrated Media division (E&DN/IM). For the past three years, Mehta has served as President, Business Operations, Strategy and Development for NBCUniversal. He managed negotiations for NBCU’s purchase of The Weather Channel; played a key role the creation of A&E Television Networks, a merger of A&E and Lifetime in which NBCU has an interest; as well as the sale of the company’s Sundance Channel unit to Rainbow Media Holdings. Most recently, he also was a key player in NBCUniversal’s integration with Comcast. “Salil spent nearly a year leading the integration efforts between NBCUniversal and Comcast, so I had the chance to work with him closely,” said NBCU CEO Steve Burke. “Salil is an expert problem solver and a great executive." In his new role, Mehta will oversee all day-to-day operations, finance, legal and business affairs, business development and strategic planning for E&DN/IM’s entire portfolio, which includes Telemundo, mun2, Bravo Media, Oxygen Media and Style and the digital properties iVillage, DailyCandy, Swirl and Fandango. He also will have direct oversight of NBCU's partially owned cable networks Sprout, ExerciseTV and TVOne. Mehta will report to the division's chairman Lauren Zalaznick.

IP: Logged

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 700
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted July 25, 2011 05:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Lots more cuts coming.

IP: Logged

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 700
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted August 12, 2011 01:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Trouble.

IP: Logged

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8410
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted February 15, 2012 11:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NBC Reruns on Netflix Boost Comcast’s Bottom Line

by Peter Kafka

Netflix is trying its hand at producing new TV shows, like “Lilyhammer.” But it is spending the vast majority of its ballooning content budget buying old stuff.

A good reminder of that comes from today’s Comcast earnings report, where the cable giant notes that its NBC broadcast unit posted a $305 million bump in licensing fees last year, “primarily the result of a licensing agreement for prior season and library content.”

Comcast doesn’t identify which agreement that was, but people familiar with the company say it was the “multi-year” renewal agreement that Netflix and NBC Universal announced last July. That deal gives Netflix subs access to shows like “The Office” and “Parenthood.”

Comcast generated $55.8 billion in revenue last year, so that $300 million barely qualifies as a drop in a bucket. But it is a profitable drop, since licensing revenue is basically found money with big fat margins.

And given that woeful NBC saw revenue drop 7.1 percent last year to $6.4 billion,* that money is nice to have.

Meanwhile, a quick check on Comcast’s cable business: It lost 17,000 video subscribers in the last quarter, which Comcast executives say is a great result, because it’s the lowest quarterly drop they’ve had in five years. And the company added 336,000 broadband customers.

*Some of that drop is because the network saw a boost from the Olympics in 2010.

IP: Logged

DavidChang
Director

Posts: 700
From:Toluca Lake, California
Registered: Apr 2000

posted February 22, 2012 05:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DavidChang   Click Here to Email DavidChang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Comcast Takes Aim at Netflix (wsj)
Comcast Corp. opened a new front in the Internet-video wars Tuesday, unveiling a new subscription service that will compete more directly with online streamer Netflix Inc. The Philadelphia-based cable operator said it plans this week to launch Xfinity Streampix, which will give Comcast video subscribers a selection of older movies and prior-season TV shows that they can watch on TVs and Internet-connected devices. Comcast's service will cost $4.99 a month for most Comcast subscribers, cheaper than Netflix, which offers similar types of programming and charges $7.99 a month. But Comcast will make Streampix available for no extra charge to more than two million subscribers who pay for expensive tiers of video service. Comcast, the biggest U.S. cable operator, had 22.3 million video subscribers at Dec. 31. "We want to be the single stop for video needs for consumers," said Marcien Jenckes, who is in charge of Comcast's video offerings. Internet retailer Amazon.com Inc. has been striking content-licensing deals with various Hollywood studios for its own Web-streaming service, which is bundled as a sweetener to customers who pay $79 a year for discounted shipping through an offering called Amazon Prime. Meanwhile, satellite-TV operator Dish Network Corp. sells a streaming movie subscription service to its existing TV subscribers, and telecom giant Verizon Communications Inc. recently struck a deal with Coinstar Inc.'s Redbox to launch a similar service later this year, too. "Netflix leads a big, growing market and big growing markets always attract competition," said Netflix spokesman Steve Swasey. And while Streampix is limited to Comcast's video subscribers, the cable operator negotiated expansive content rights with media companies that would allow it to sell the service nationwide to anyone, according to people familiar with the pacts. Media executives who have negotiated deals with Comcast say that the cable giant has been seeking nationwide rights in many of its agreements to renew TV channels, even for new TV shows. Such deals could let Comcast quickly offer a nationwide online video package should a tech giant like Apple Inc. or Google Inc. opt to do so. But Comcast executives said they currently have no plans for such an offering. "We really have no intention to launch something out of our footprint," said Mr. Jenckes. Instead, he said the new Streampix service would make Comcast's existing subscriptions more attractive. Comcast said the new service isn't a Netflix competitor, but a way to enhance its other offerings to keep viewers from cutting off cable subscriptions, and to sign up for pricier tiers of service. In that way, it is similar to Comcast's existing Xfinity TV offering that gives a selection of newer shows to Comcast video customers in and out of the home, as part of their standard video subscriptions

IP: Logged


This topic is 2 pages long:   1  2 

All times are PT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | Manka Bros. Studios - Home

© 2012 Manka Bros. Studios - All Rights Reserved.

Powered by Infopop www.infopop.com © 2000
Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.45b