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NEWSFLASH WINTER INTERN
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posted February 12, 2007 09:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH WINTER INTERN   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH WINTER INTERN     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Coppola To Stage First Ever Opera


Marie Antoinette filmmaker Sofia Coppola will stage her first opera in 2009, after reaching an agreement with France's Montpellier Opera House.. The Oscar-nominated Lost In Translation director's first foray into the operatic world will see her mastermind Puccini romantic tragedy Manon Lescaut during the venue's 2009-2010 season. Controversial tenor Robert Alagna has been lined up to star in the show - he stormed off stage during a performance of Verdi's Aida in Milan, Italy and refused to return.

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NEWSFLASH
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posted June 25, 2007 10:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Allen To Direct Opera

Academy Award-winning filmmaker Woody Allen has shocked fans with the announcement he is to direct an opera in California. Spanish tenor Placido Domingo, general director of the Los Angeles opera, has invited Allen to direct an epic in September 2008. Allen says, "I have no idea what I am doing. But incompetence has never prevented me from plunging in with enthusiasm." Allen will direct Gianni Schicchi, part of Puccini's Il Trittico opera trio.

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fred
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posted June 28, 2007 04:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Opera star Beverly Sills gravely ill with cancer 41 minutes ago


World-renowned soprano Beverly Sills, who went from stardom on the opera stage to become chairwoman of two great U.S. opera companies, is critically ill with cancer, her publicist said on Thursday.

"It's grave. This whole matter of this discovery of cancer has been just about four weeks now. Up until that she had no idea," publicist Edgar Vincent said. He did not release details on the nature of her cancer.

Sills was in a New York hospital for a broken rib suffered from a fall. Otherwise she would be home, Vincent said.

The 78-year-old home-grown American diva resigned as chairwoman of the Metropolitan Opera in 2005, an opera house at which she did not make her official debut until 1975, five years before she retired from the stage.

Prior to her Met chairwoman job, she was chairwoman of the New York City Opera, where she had achieved stardom as a singer and became the most famous American opera singer.

Nicknamed "Bubbles" and known for her red hair as well as her gifted coloratura soprano voice, she was famed for performances in such productions as "The Magic Flute" and "Lucia di Lammermoor."

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indiedan
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posted July 02, 2007 09:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sills' Cancer Battle Confirmed


American soprano Beverly Sills is critically ill with cancer, her manager has confirmed. Reports emerged on Thursday, the 78-year-old opera star was gravely ill at a New York City hospital. Sills' manager Edger Vincent says, "It's grave. This whole matter of this discovery of cancer has been just about four weeks now. Up until that she had no idea." La Traviata star Sills was initially admitted to hospital when she broke a rib during a fall at home. The New York City-born singer, resigned her post as chairwoman of the city's Metropolitan Opera two years ago, citing health and family reasons. Sills was one of America's best-known opera stars in the 1960s and 1970s, before going on to manage the New York City Opera and the Metropolitan Opera.

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NEWSFLASH
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posted July 12, 2007 09:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Pavarotti "Fighting Like a Lion"


Opera sensation Luciano Pavarotti's wife has hit out at reports he's close to death, declaring he's "fighting like a lion." Fears for the Italian tenor's health have been mounting since his daughter Guiliana reportedly told a magazine earlier this month her famous father hasn't got long to live. He is battling pancreatic cancer and largely wheelchair-bound. However, his wife Nicoletta Mantovani insists the 71-year-old is recovering courageously. She says, "I can now say he is doing well. He's reacting well to a fifth cycle of radiotherapy. He's fighting like a lion and he has never lost his heart, also because a family he adores is by his side. He's determined and results are encouraging. Despite the heavy treatment he has not lost weight - which by the way he would have liked - or his hair."

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NEWSFLASH
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posted August 10, 2007 09:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Pavarotti's Condition "Satisfactory"


Medics at the Italian hospital caring for opera superstar Luciano Pavarotti have played down health fears, insisting his condition is "satisfactory." The Italian tenor, who is battling pancreatic cancer, was admitted to the Modena University Policlinico in northern Italy on Wednesday with a fever. But, in a statement, his doctors reassure fans, saying, "He is currently under observation and his condition is satisfactory. He can be released within the next few days." Pavarotti underwent surgery for his cancer last year and has since had at least five rounds of chemotherapy. Fears for his health mounted further last month when his daughter Guiliana reportedly told a magazine her famous father hasn't got long to live.

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NEWSFLASH
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posted August 15, 2007 09:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Pavarotti Opts To Stay in Hospital


Opera star Luciano Pavarotti has decided to remain in a Modena, Italy hospital, despite being given the all-clear by doctors to leave. The tenor, 71, was admitted to the University Policlinico in northern Italy last Wednesday after suffering from a fever. Pavarotti's manager initially said the singer would be checking out of the hospital "imminently" because doctors had "happily given him the go-ahead to leave hospital and resume his summer holiday." However, his wife Nicoletta Mantovani later told the media outside the hospital that her husband had decided to stay a few days longer because he feels "more tranquil there than at home." Pavarotti underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer last year and has since had at least five rounds of chemotherapy.

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EmilySachs
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posted September 05, 2007 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for EmilySachs   Click Here to Email EmilySachs     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Report: Pavarotti's condition worsens 22 minutes ago


Luciano Pavarotti, who has pancreatic cancer, was in "very serious" condition, the Italian news agency AGI reported Wednesday.

The 71-year-old was at home in Modena being cared for by doctors from the local hospital, where he underwent two weeks of tests and treatment in August, the news agency said, without citing any sources.

Hospital spokesman Alberto Greco confirmed Pavarotti was at home, but said he had no further information.

Pavarotti's manager, Terri Robson, did not deny the report; an associate answering Robson's phone said she had no comment.

Pavarotti was released from the hospital Aug. 25, more than two weeks after he was admitted with a high fever. At the time, Robson denied Italian news reports that he had been treated for pneumonia.

The opera star had surgery for the cancer in July 2006 in a New York hospital.

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly forms of the disease, though doctors said the surgery offered improved hopes for survival.

At the time of the operation, Pavarotti had been preparing to resume his farewell tour. He has made no public appearances since then.


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fred
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posted September 05, 2007 11:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Italian tenor Pavarotti dies at age 71 By ALESSANDRA RIZZO, Associated Press Writer
25 minutes ago


Luciano Pavarotti, whose vibrant high C's and ebullient showmanship made him the most beloved and celebrated tenor since Caruso and one of the few opera singers to win crossover fame as a popular superstar, died Thursday. He was 71.

His manager, Terri Robson, told the AP in an e-mailed statement that Pavarotti died at his home in Modena, Italy, at 5 a.m. local time. Pavarotti had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year and underwent further treatment in August.

"The Maestro fought a long, tough battle against the pancreatic cancer which eventually took his life. In fitting with the approach that characterised his life and work, he remained positive until finally succumbing to the last stages of his illness," the statement said.

For serious fans, the unforced beauty and thrilling urgency of Pavarotti's voice made him the ideal interpreter of the Italian lyric repertory, especially in the 1960s and '70s when he first achieved stardom. For millions more, his charismatic performances of standards like "Nessun Dorma" from Puccini's "Turandot" came to represent what opera is all about.

In fact, "Nessun Dorma" was Pavarotti's last performance, sung at at the opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, in February 2006. His last full-scale concert was in Taipei in, December 2005.

It was the second monumental loss in the opera world in recent months. American soprano Beverly Sills, whose widespread popularity mirrored Pavarotti's, died July 2 at her home in New York. She was 78 and suffered from cancer.

Instantly recognizable from his charcoal black beard and tuxedo-busting girth, Pavarotti radiated an intangible magic that helped him win hearts in a way Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras — his partners in the "Three Tenors" concerts — never quite could.

"I always admired the God-given glory of his voice — that unmistakable special timbre from the bottom up to the very top of the tenor range," Domingo said in a statement from Los Angeles.

"I also loved his wonderful sense of humor and on several occasions of our concerts with Jose Carreras — the so-called Three Tenors concerts — we had trouble remembering that we were giving a concert before a paying audience, because we had so much fun between ourselves," he said.

Pavarotti, who seemed equally at ease singing with soprano Joan Sutherland as with the Spice Girls, scoffed at accusations that he was sacrificing his art in favor of commercialism.

"The word commercial is exactly what we want," he said, after appearing in the widely publicized "Three Tenors" concerts. "We've reached 1.5 billion people with opera. If you want to use the word commercial, or something more derogatory, we don't care. Use whatever you want."

In the annals of that rare and coddled breed, the operatic tenor, it may well be said the 20th century began with Enrico Caruso and ended with Pavarotti. Other tenors — Domingo included — may have drawn more praise from critics for their artistic range and insights, but none could equal the combination of natural talent and personal charm that so endeared Pavarotti to audiences.

"Pavarotti is the biggest superstar of all," the late New York Times music critic Harold Schonberg once said. "He's correspondingly more spoiled than anybody else. They think they can get away with anything. Thanks to the glory of his voice, he probably can."

In his heyday, he was known as the "King of the High C's" for the ease with which he tossed off difficult top notes. In fact it was his ability to hit nine glorious high C's in quick succession that first turned him into an international superstar singing Tonio's aria "Ah! Mes amis," in Donizetti's "La Fille du Regiment" at New York's Metropolitan Opera in 1972.

In the 1990s, Pavarotti's teaming with Domingo and Carreras became a music business phenomenon and spawned copycats such as the Three Irish Tenors.

Pavarotti starred in a film called "Yes, Giorgio" (though its failure scuttled his hopes for a Hollywood career) and appeared in a filmed version of "Rigoletto." He wrote an autobiography, "I, Luciano Pavarotti," and made more than 90 recordings.

From Beijing to Buenos Aires, people immediately recognized his incandescent smile and lumbering bulk, clutching a white handkerchief as he sang arias and Neapolitan folk songs, pop numbers and Christmas carols for hundreds of thousands in outdoor concerts.

His name seemed to show up as much in gossip columns as serious music reviews, particularly after he split with Adua Veroni, his wife of 35 years and mother of their three daughters, and then took up with his 26-year-old secretary in 1996.

In late 2003, he married Nicoletta Mantovani in a lavish, star-studded ceremony. Pavarotti said their daughter Alice, nearly a year old at the time of the wedding, was the main reason he and Mantovani finally wed after years together.

In the latter part of his career, some music critics cited what they saw as an increasing tendency toward the vulgar and the commercial.

He came under fire for canceling performances or pandering to the lowest common denominator in his choice of programs, or for the Three Tenors tours and their millions of dollars in fees.

He was criticized for lip-synching at a concert in Modena, Italy, his hometown. An artist accused him of copying her works from a how-to-draw book and selling the paintings.

The son of a baker who was an amateur singer, Pavarotti was born Oct. 12, 1935, in Modena. He had a meager upbringing, though he said it was rich with happiness.

"Our family had very little, but I couldn't imagine one could have any more," Pavarotti said.

As a boy, Pavarotti showed more interest in soccer than his studies, but he also was fond of listening to his father's recordings of tenor greats like Beniamino Gigli, Tito Schipa, Jussi Bjoerling and Giuseppe Di Stefano, his favorite.

Among his close childhood friends was Mirella Freni, who would eventually become a soprano and an opera great herself. The two studied singing together and years later ended up making records and concerts together, according to Elvio Giudici, an Italian opera critic.

In his teens, Pavarotti joined his father, also a tenor, in the church choir and local opera chorus. He was influenced by the American movie actor-singer Mario Lanza.

"In my teens I used to go to Mario Lanza movies and then come home and imitate him in the mirror," Pavarotti said.

Singing was still nothing more than a passion while Pavarotti trained to become a teacher and began working in a school.

But at 20, he traveled with his chorus to an international music competition in Wales. The Modena group won first place, and Pavarotti began to dedicate himself to singing.

With the encouragement of his then fiancee, Adua Veroni, he started lessons, selling insurance to pay for them. He studied with Arrigo Pola and later Ettore Campogalliani.

In 1961, Pavarotti won a local voice competition and with it a debut as Rodolfo in Puccini's "La Boheme."

He followed with a series of successes in small opera houses throughout Europe before his 1963 debut at Covent Garden in London, where he stood in for Di Stefano as Rodolfo.

Having impressed conductor Richard Bonynge, Pavarotti was given a role opposite Bonynge's wife, soprano Joan Sutherland, in a Miami production of "Lucia di Lamermoor." They subsequently signed him for a 14-week tour of Australia.

It was the recognition Pavarotti needed to launch his career. He also credited Sutherland with teaching him how to breathe correctly.

In the following years, Pavarotti made a series of major debuts, appearing at La Scala in Milan in 1965, San Francisco in 1967 and New York's Metropolitan Opera House in 1968. Other early venues included Vienna, Paris and Chicago.

Throughout his career, Pavarotti struggled with a much-publicized weight problem. His love of food caused him to balloon to a reported high of 396 pounds in 1978.

"Maybe this time I'll really do it and keep it up," he said during one of his constant attempts at dieting.

Pavarotti, who had been trained as a lyric tenor, began taking on heavier dramatic tenor roles, such as Manrico in Verdi's "Trovatore" and the title role in "Otello."

Pavarotti often drew comparisons with Domingo, his most notable contemporary. Aficionados judged Domingo the more complete and consistent musician, but he never captured the public imagination like Pavarotti.

Though there appeared to be professional jealousy between the great singers, Pavarotti claimed he preferred to judge himself only against his earlier performances.

In the mid-1970s, Pavarotti became a true media star. He appeared in television commercials and began appearing in hugely lucrative mega-concerts outdoors and in stadiums around the world. Soon came joint concerts with pop stars. A concert in New York's Central Park in 1993 drew 500,000 fans.

Pavarotti's recording of "Volare" went platinum in 1988.

In 1990, he appeared with Domingo and Carreras in a concert at the Baths of Caracalla in Rome for the end of soccer's World Cup. The concert was a huge success, and the record known as "The Three Tenors" was a best-seller and was nominated for two Grammy awards. The video sold over 750,000 copies.

The three-tenor extravaganza became a mini-industry. With a follow-up album recorded at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles in 1994, the three have outsold every other performer of classical music. A 1996 tour earned each tenor an estimated $10 million.

Pavarotti liked to mingle with pop stars in his series of charity concerts, "Pavarotti & Friends," held annually in Modena. He performed with artists as varied as Ricky Martin, James Brown and the Spice Girls.

The performances raised some eyebrows but he always shrugged off the criticism.

Some say the "word pop is a derogatory word to say 'not important' — I do not accept that," Pavarotti said in a 2004 interview with the AP. "If the word classic is the word to say 'boring,' I do not accept. There is good and bad music."

It was not just his annual extravaganza that saw Pavarotti involved in humanitarian work.

During the 1992-95 Bosnia war, he collected humanitarian aid along with U2 lead singer Bono, and after the war he financed and established the Pavarotti Music Center in the southern city of Mostar to offer Bosnia's artists the opportunity to develop their skills.

He performed at benefit concerts to raise money for victims of tragedies such as an earthquake in December 1988 that killed 25,000 people in northern Armenia.

Pavarotti was also dogged by accusations of tax evasion, and in 2000 he agreed to pay nearly roughly $12 million to the Italian state after he had unsuccessfully claimed that the tax haven of Monte Carlo rather than Italy was his official residence.

He had been accused in 1996 of filing false tax returns for 1989-91.

Pavarotti always denied wrongdoing, saying he paid taxes wherever he performed. But, upon agreeing to the settlement, he said: "I cannot live being thought not a good person."

Pavarotti was preparing to leave New York in July 2006 to resume a farewell tour when doctors discovered a malignant pancreatic mass, his manager Robson said at the time. He underwent surgery in a New York hospital, and all his remaining 2006 concerts were canceled.

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most dangerous forms of the disease, though doctors said the surgery offered improved hopes for survival.

"I was a fortunate and happy man," Pavarotti told Italian daily Corriere della Sera in an interview published about a month after the surgery. "After that, this blow arrived."

"And now I am paying the penalty for this fortune and happiness," he told the newspaper.

Fans were still waiting for a public appearance a year after his surgery. In the summer, Pavarotti taught a group of selected students and worked on a recording of sacred songs, a work expected to be released in early 2008, according to his manager. He mostly divided his time between his home town, Modena, and his villa in the Adriatic seaside resort of Pesaro.

Faced with speculation that the tenor was near death, Mantovani, his second wife, told Italian newspaper La Stampa in July 2007: "He's fighting like a lion and he has never lost his heart."

Pavarotti had three daughters with his first wife, Lorenza, Cristina and Giuliana; and one, Alice, with his second wife.

At his side when he died were his wife, Nicoletta; his four daughters; his sister, Gabriela; his nephews and close relatives and friends, Robson said.

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N F S I 2
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posted September 06, 2007 09:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for N F S I 2   Click Here to Email N F S I 2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Luciano Pavarotti Dies at 71


Opera legend Luciano Pavarotti has died at age 71, as his health deteriorated to a "very serious" condition after he fell unconscious; he passed away at his home at 5 a.m. local time. The Italian tenor's health took a turn for the worse following his recent hospital stay to undergo treatment for pancreatic cancer, and, on Wednesday, a local TV news station in Modena reported Pavarotti was on his death bed after suffering kidney failure. Friends and family of the 71-year-old singer held a bedside vigil at his home in Modena, located in northern Italy. A spokesperson for the University Policlinico hospital, where the singer was previously treated, refused to comment on the status of his health. Pavarotti underwent surgery for cancer last year and had at least five rounds of chemotherapy. In addition to his innumerable opera roles, Pavarotti also starred in the 1982 film Yes, Giorgio and won an Emmy award for his 1985 appearance on the PBS Great Performances series.

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posted September 07, 2007 09:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Tributes to Pavarotti Pour In


Tributes have poured in for Luciano Pavarotti after he lost his battle with pancreatic cancer at the age of 71 on Thursday. Fellow tenor, Placido Domingo, conceded he would miss Pavarotti's sense of humor and his voice most. He said, "I always admired the God-given glory of his voice - that unmistakable special timbre from the bottom up to the very top of the tenor range. I also loved his wonderful sense of humor and on several occasions of our concerts with Jose Carreras - the so-called Three Tenors concerts - we had trouble remembering that we were giving a concert before a paying audience, because we had so much fun between ourselves." Opera star Dame Joan Sutherland, who performed many times with Pavarotti, added, "It was incredible to stand next to him and sing along. The quality of the sound was so different. You knew immediately it was Luciano who was singing."

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posted September 08, 2007 09:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for a   Click Here to Email a     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Pavarotti given final ovation at tearful funeral
Sat Sep 8, 2007 12:58 PM ET

By Gilles Castonguay

MODENA, Italy (Reuters) - About 50,000 mourners paid tribute to Luciano Pavarotti at his funeral in his hometown on Saturday and Prime Minister Romano Prodi said Italy was "sad but proud" to salute one of the greatest tenors in opera history.

Rock stars, political leaders and loved ones wept and applauded after seeing a film of Pavarotti and his father Fernando performing the hymn Panis Angelicus, giving the singer a standing ovation that lasted several minutes.

"The death of Pavarotti has made us feel poorer," said Archbishop Benito Cocchi, leading the service at the cathedral in Modena -- the town where Pavarotti was born the son of a baker and died a superstar.

Fourteen pallbearers carried the coffin out of the cathedral to applause and cheers of "bravo" from the crowd as a recording of his most famous aria -- "Nessun Dorma" from Puccini's "Turandot" -- played over loudspeakers.

As Pavarotti sang the song's famous line "All'alba vincero'" -- "At dawn I will be victorious" -- the air force's aerobatics team soared above the church, marking the blue sky with the green, white and red smoke forming the Italian flag.

U2 frontman Bono sat next to film director Franco Zeffirelli at the service, near Pavarotti's widow Nicoletta Mantovani, and ex-wife Adua who sat an opposite ends of the same pew.

Some 50,000 fans in the sunlit square outside the 12th century cathedral watched the service on giant screens. The images were broadcast live on state television and the Internet.

Bulgarian soprano Raina Kabaivanska opened the service, amid the cathedral's gilded frescos, with Ave Maria from Verdi's Otello. Another of Pavarotti's friends, blind Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli, sang Mozart's Ave Verum Corpus.

The choir -- Corale Rossini -- was the same one in which both Pavarotti and his father once sang.

EXCEPTIONAL GIFT

Archbishop Cocchi remembered Pavarotti's life. "The story of a boy who had the natural gift of an exceptional voice which he cultivated with tenacity and thus became the leading figure among all the tenors of his time."

"Nessun Dorma", which has become a soccer anthem, rang out at London's Wembley Stadium on Saturday ahead of a match between England and Israel and was due to be played in Paris at a match between France and Italy as a tribute to Pavarotti.

Prodi recalled the singer's role as a cultural ambassador as well as his recordings and performances to promote peace.

"He made music an instrument for life and against war. It's true that Luciano Pavarotti wanted to be remembered above all as a great opera singer, but we want to pay homage also to his great humanity," Prodi told mourners.

Born to a local baker father and a cigar factory worker mother, Pavarotti trained as a teacher, dreamt of being a soccer star, but pursued a career in singing -- a passion instilled in him by his father, a keen amateur.

Pavarotti shot to fame as an understudy in a performance of "La Boheme" at London's Covent Garden in 1963.

He went on to popularize what had been an elite art form, performing as one of the "Three Tenors" with Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras in Rome during the 1990 soccer World Cup in Italy.

Before the coffin was sealed, 100,000 mourners paid respects to Pavarotti, dressed in a tuxedo with a trademark handkerchief in his hand. On a wreath, his four-year-old daughter had left a colorful stick-figure drawing signed "Alice".

""He moved me," said 51-year-old housewife Rosanna Cipriano of the singer whose generous girth and twinkly eyes were as famous as his voice. "When he sang he touched your heart."

After an operation for pancreatic cancer last year, he had hoped to finish a world tour. He died on Thursday at the age of 71, leaving the four-year old daughter with his second wife and three grown-up daughters from his first marriage.

Pavarotti's coffin was taken to rest at the Montale Rangone cemetery near his villa outside of town, where his parents and his stillborn son Riccardo are buried.

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posted November 23, 2007 09:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
British Fundamentalist Protests Springer "Opera"


A fundamentalist Christian leader on Tuesday sought to have Britain's High Court overturn a lower-court order tossing out his lawsuit against the BBC and the producers of Jerry Springer: The Opera, which aired on the publicly supported network in 2005. Stephen Green of the group Christian Voice called the production blasphemous and therefore unlawful under British law. But civil liberties groups filed briefs with the court contending that Britain's blasphemy law is outdated and violates the European Convention on Human Rights, to which the country is a signatory. Anna Fairclough, legal officer of the group Liberty, said in a filing, "These blasphemy laws should be shelved in dusty archives, not used as a tool to bring mischievous prosecutions against the arts."

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posted January 10, 2008 09:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for N F S I 2   Click Here to Email N F S I 2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Allen, Friedkin & Cronenberg To Direct Operas


Movie directors Woody Allen, William Friedkin and David Cronenberg will each direct a production for the Los Angeles Opera in the 2008/09 season. Allen will oversee Gianni Schicchi, one of three one-act operas that make up Giacomo Puccini's Il Trittico. The Exorcist filmmaker Friedkin will direct the other two operas in the trilogy, Il Tabarro and Suor Angelica. Cronenberg will direct the U.S. premiere of Howard Shore's The Fly, based on his own 1986 movie remake of the same name. Placido Domingo, the Los Angeles Opera's general director, says, "I'm tremendously excited about our 2008/09 season because it is full of adventure. The kind of musical and theatrical exploration which appeals not only to established opera lovers but might be the right kind of lure for potentially new audiences."

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posted February 27, 2008 01:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for NEWSFLASH   Click Here to Email NEWSFLASH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
San Francisco Opera To Be Seen Across Country: But Not in SF


Performances of four classic operas by the San Francisco Opera Company will be shown over four weekends in March and April in 121 movie theaters across the country, the San Francisco Chronicle reported today (Wednesday). The operas include Puccini's La Rondine, Saint-Saëns's Samson and Delilah, Mozart's Don Giovanni, and Puccini's Madama Butterfly. However, unlike the operas produced by New York's Metropolitan Opera, the San Francisco Opera's performances were shot at the War Memorial Opera House and were later edited and otherwise enhanced in post-production by the distributor, The Bigger Picture. Ironically, the Chronicle pointed out, the performances will not be screened in any theater in San Francisco, Oakland, or Berkeley because of a scarcity of theaters with advanced digital equipment in those cities.

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