Manka Bros. Studios - Home
  Manka Bros. Message Boards
  Music
  Opera (Page 6)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

UBBFriend: Email This Page to Someone!
This topic is 7 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5  6  7 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Opera
fred
A-List Writer

Posts: 8175
From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted May 07, 2008 05:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's like when we tried to get an Opera topic going... remember that?

IP: Logged

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8415
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted June 09, 2008 08:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Brokeback Mountain The Opera
9 June 2008 9:02 AM, PDT

An opera based on Oscar-winning movie Brokeback Mountain is heading for the New York City stage.

Charles Wuorinen has been given the job of adapting Annie Proulx novel for the stage, in a show slated to premiere in 2013.

Ang Lee's movie adaptation scooped three Academy Awards in 2006, starring Jake Gyllenhaal and the late Heath Ledger as two gay ranch hands.

IP: Logged

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8415
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted July 03, 2008 11:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Fly: The Opera

3 July 2008 10:37 AM, PDT

David Cronenberg has successfully transposed his 1986 horror movie The Fly into an opera with music by the film's composer, Howard Shore (best known for his Lord of the Rings score), and a 75-piece orchestra conducted by famed tenor Placido Domingo. The production received a standing ovation at its opening in Paris Wednesday night, according to published reports. It is due to play for two weeks in Paris before moving on to Los Angeles in September.

IP: Logged

N F S I 2
A-List Writer

Posts: 641
From:Burbank, CA
Registered: Jun 2006

posted July 08, 2008 08:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for N F S I 2   Click Here to Email N F S I 2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Friedkin To Take Inconvenient Truth To The Opera House

8 July 2008 9:08 AM, PDT

Latest: The Exorcist director William Friedkin has been recruited to direct the forthcoming opera adaptation of global warming documentary An Inconvenient Truth.

The production will open in Italy at Milan's famous La Scala opera house on 11 May 2011. It will be written by poet J.D. McClatchy and the score composed by Giorgio Battistelli.

Director Davis Guggenheim's film, which starred former U.S. Vice President Al Gore as narrator, premiered at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival and has since taken the world by storm.

The documentary won Academy Awards for Best Documentary Feature and for Best Original Song at 2007's ceremony.

IP: Logged

N F S I 2
A-List Writer

Posts: 641
From:Burbank, CA
Registered: Jun 2006

posted July 14, 2008 09:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for N F S I 2   Click Here to Email N F S I 2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Fly Lands In America

14 July 2008 9:14 AM, PDT

The stage production of The Fly will make its debut in America later this year.

The show - which premiered in Paris last week (ends13Jul08) - is due to open at the Los Angeles Opera this September, reports New York gossip column Page Six.

The production stars Daniel Okulitch as scientist-turned-insect Seth Brundle - a role made famous by Jeff Goldblum in the 1986 movie version.

IP: Logged

N F S I 2
A-List Writer

Posts: 641
From:Burbank, CA
Registered: Jun 2006

posted October 08, 2008 04:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for N F S I 2   Click Here to Email N F S I 2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Opera Goers Going To The Movies

Despite little promotion, screenings of New York's Metropolitan Opera being beamed live via satellite to 466 theaters this season are expected to be viewed by 1.2 million people, paying about $22 per ticket, the New York Times reported today (Wednesday). Such event screenings, the newspaper observed, also help exhibitors sell tickets and concession items during midweek nights and weekend afternoons. Producers of other stage shows have also been able to increase ticket sales substantially with the satellite screenings, which have included Cirque du Soleil's Delirium and the closing-night performance of Rent, without incurring the substantial costs of film prints and distribution, the Times observed.

IP: Logged

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8415
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted December 02, 2008 03:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
La Scala Director Bertola Dies

Former director of Italy's La Scala theatre Giulio Bertola has died at the age of 87.

Bertola, who directed the choir at the famed theatre from 1983 to 1991, died on Sunday.

A spokesperson for the opera house said Bertola suffered a long battle with illness, but did not elaborate on the cause of death.

In a statement about his tenure, the spokesperson said: "A complete musician, director and composer, Giulio Bertola was one of the keepers of the great tradition of Italian choral singing, leaving his mark of extraordinary rigour on La Scala."

Before joining La Scala, he also directed the choir in a 1983 concert for Pope John Paul II.

Bertola also worked in theatres including the Fenice, in Venice, and the Academy of Santa Cecilia, in Rome.

Information on Bertola's survivors and funeral arrangements were not available as WENN went to press.

IP: Logged

opus_125
A-List Writer

Posts: 290
From:Portland, Oregon
Registered: Apr 2000

posted January 20, 2009 05:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for opus_125   Click Here to Email opus_125     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm listening to Gotterdammerung. It seems appropriate.

IP: Logged

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8415
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted March 09, 2009 09:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Former Metropolitan Opera Boss Chapin Dies

Schuyler Chapin, a former general manager of New York's Metropolitan Opera, has died. He was 86.

An aristocratic arts official, Chapin died on Saturday at his home in Manhattan. He had been battling ill health since suffering a heart attack in 2005, according to his son, Theodore.

In addition to his post at the Met, he served as vice president for programming at New York's famous Lincoln Center; was dean at Columbia University School of the Arts for 10 years and served as New York's cultural affairs commissioner during the 1990s.

In the last year of his life, Chapin took a more artistic role of his own, with a small speaking part in a recording of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Allegro, released in February.

Chapin is survived by his wife, Catia Z. Mortimer, four sons, eight grandchildren, two step-grandchildren and one great-grandson.

IP: Logged

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8415
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted April 30, 2009 09:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mendes Cancels Opera Debut

30 April 2009 9:10 AM, PDT

Sam Mendes has pulled out of directing his first opera at the 2010 Glyndebourne Festival in England.

The acclaimed theatre director was due to helm a production of Mozart's Don Giovanni for his highly-anticipated opera debut at the annual British event.

But he has now backed out, insisting his new U.S. theatre company "turned out to be much more time and energy-consuming than I ever could have guessed, and has tied me almost permanently to New York".

Mendes is adamant the cancellation was made with "great regret" and has nothing to do with the cast or production.

Jonathan Kent has signed up to replace Mendes at the Sussex, England festival.

IP: Logged

fred
A-List Writer

Posts: 8175
From:Redmond, WA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted June 23, 2009 04:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for fred   Click Here to Email fred     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Opera 'is music for the heart'

Listening to the right kind of music can slow the heart and lower blood pressure, a study has revealed.

Rousing operatic music, like Puccini's Nessun Dorma, full of crescendos and diminuendos is best and could help stroke rehabilitation, say the authors.

Music is already used holistically at the bedside in many hospitals.

Not only is it cheap and easy to administer, music has discernible physical effects on the body as well as mood, Circulation journal reports.

Music with a faster tempo increases breathing, heart rate and blood pressure, while slower-pace music does the reverse.
“ Music induces a continuous, dynamic - and to some extent predictable - change in the cardiovascular system ”
Lead researcher Dr Luciano Bernardi

Dr Luciano Bernardi and colleagues, from Italy's Pavia University, asked 24 healthy volunteers to listen to five random tracks of classical music and monitored how their bodies responded.

They included selections from Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, an aria from Puccini's Turandot, Bach's cantata No 169, Va Pensiero from Nabucco and Libiam Nei Lieti Calici from La Traviata.

Every musical crescendo - a gradual volume increase - "aroused" the body and led to narrowing of blood vessels under the skin, increased blood pressure and heart rate and increased respiratory rates.

Conversely, the diminuendos - gradual volume decreases - caused relaxation, which slowed heart rate and lowered blood pressure.

Swelling crescendos

The researchers tested out various combinations of music and silence on the volunteers and found tracks rich in emphasis that alternated between fast and slow, like operatic music, appeared to be the best for the circulation and the heart.

Verdi's arias, which follow music phrases that are 10 seconds long, appeared to synchronise perfectly with the natural cardiovascular rhythm.
“ The power of music is just incredible ”
Diana Greenman, chief executive of Music in Hospitals

Dr Bernadi said: "Music induces a continuous, dynamic - and to some extent predictable - change in the cardiovascular system.

"These findings increase our understanding of how music could be used in rehabilitative medicine."

Music in Hospitals is a UK-based charity that provides live music to hospitals, hospices and care and residential homes across the country. It was originally set up after World War II to help injured veterans.

Its chief executive, Diana Greenman, said: "We have seen enormous benefits in people who have had strokes or heart attacks. The power of music is just incredible.

"Music is holistic, but I hear time and again of stroke patients who suddenly are able to move in time to the music after previously being paralysed."

She said it was important to tailor the performance to the individual, since not all people appreciate the same music.

A spokesman for the Stroke Association said: "We have seen from previous pieces of research that a positive emotional state - that can be brought on from listening to music - can help stroke survivors.

"In fact, many of our support groups use music and singing techniques to aid stroke survivors' recoveries.

"We would therefore welcome further research into this particular study which could help benefit the 150,000 people affected by stroke each year."

IP: Logged

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8415
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted October 23, 2009 11:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Opera diva accused of NYC eatery drama
Incident allegedly came after manager complained of loud cell phone use
The Associated Press
updated 6:37 a.m. PT, Fri., Oct . 23, 2009

NEW YORK - An Argentine diva has been accused of creating a drama of operatic proportions at a Manhattan cafe.

Gabriela Pochinki was due in court Friday on a misdemeanor summons, accused of shoving the manager of Nice Matin, shouting and refusing to pay her bill last weekend.

Witnesses told the Daily News the ordeal was sparked when the soprano was making a loud cell phone call and the manager asked her to quiet down.

'Peaceful person'
The paper says Pochinki has recorded with the Krakow Radio Symphony Orchestra in Poland and worked on an album with Michael Jackson's father, Joe Jackson. In 2002, she starred in "West Side Story" at the Volksoper opera house in Vienna.

Her business manager, William Kitainik, tells the New York Post that Pochinki is "the most peaceful person you'll ever meet."

IP: Logged

indiedan
A-List Writer

Posts: 8415
From:Santa Monica
Registered: May 2000

posted February 05, 2010 08:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indiedan   Click Here to Email indiedan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
New York Opera Rehires Manager

* Article
* Comments

more in Business »

* Email
* Print
*

Save This ↓ More
*
o

facebook
facebook
o

Twitter
Twitter
o

Digg
Digg
o

StumbleUpon
StumbleUpon
o + More
close
o Yahoo! Buzz
o MySpace
o del.icio.us
o Reddit
o LinkedIn
o Fark
o Viadeo
o Orkut
* larger Text smaller

By ERICA ORDEN

New York's Metropolitan Opera is bringing back Joseph Volpe, who left three years ago after 16 years as the company's general manager, to lead contract talks with some of its major unions.

The move marks an unusual decision by one of the world's preeminent cultural institutions to create a new job for a retired chief. Upon leaving the Met, Mr. Volpe wrote a memoir that offered unvarnished criticism of many aspects of Lincoln Center, particularly its redevelopment project. Meanwhile, his successor, Peter Gelb, has taken some big steps to change the organization, bringing in directors from the world of theater, broadcasting operas live to movie theaters and launching glossy marketing campaigns.

The labor negotiations, to begin in coming months, may prove contentious as the company tries to deal with a next-season deficit projected in September to be $4 million and with recent losses to its endowment.

Mr. Volpe, who began at the Met as a carpenter and served as its leader until 2006, will operate on behalf of Mr. Gelb, the current general manager, to secure new contracts with unions including those representing stagehands, orchestra and chorus members. Most of the Met's current union contracts expire at the end of the 2010-11 season.

"It was a decision that was made because I believe when faced with a very complicated and what could be a difficult and long and protracted labor negotiation—I hope it won't be—with a number of different unions, that it makes sense to have the best possible team," Mr. Gelb said. "I realize it may come as somewhat of a surprise that I would engage him, but I think it's logical because he has had enormous experience with and knowledge of the unions…and has a proven track record."

Though Mr. Gelb initiated the hire, the decision received approval by the company's board, Mr. Gelb said. The deal was completed earlier this week.

Union leaders expressed enthusiasm over Mr. Volpe's involvement. "I think hiring Volpe sends a signal that Gelb's goal is to reach an amicable agreement without the need for a strike or a lockout," said Alan Gordon, executive director of the American Guild of Musical Artists, the chorus members' union. "We view it as a tremendous positive step. It took a lot for Gelb to do it."

One board member expressed concern that the appointment showed a lack of confidence in Mr. Gelb's ability to manage labor relations.

"I think the fact that I would engage [Mr. Volpe] is an indication that I'm trying to formulate a successful strategy to manage labor relations," Mr. Gelb said. "I can't do everything.…So I think that's somewhat of a misinformed remark."

IP: Logged

EmilySachs
Director

Posts: 317
From:Studio City, CA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted March 08, 2010 09:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for EmilySachs   Click Here to Email EmilySachs     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Met premieres Shostakovich's absurdist 'The Nose'
By MIKE SILVERMAN, For The Associated Press Mike Silverman, For The Associated Press Sat Mar 6, 1:46 am ET

NEW YORK – Dmitri Shostakovich composed his first opera, "The Nose," more than 80 years ago and based it on a short story written nearly a century before that.

Yet few works in the repertory seem more modern or musically challenging than this absurdist masterpiece that came to the Metropolitan Opera for the first time Friday night.

Written when the composer was just 22, the opera is adapted from a story by Nikolai Gogol about a bureaucrat in St. Petersburg named Kovalyov who wakes up to discover his nose is missing. With the logic of a nightmare, he pursues it through the town, allowing Gogol — and Shostakovich — to satirize just about every institution of Russian life: the bureaucracy, the church, the press, the police, the medical profession.

At one point, the nose takes human form and appears as a bureaucrat who outranks the befuddled Kovalyov and haughtily snubs him.

Shostakovich set this bizarre tale to a score that is brimming with energy, a riot of atonal exuberance, filled with percussion seemingly run amok, brassy vulgarity and vocal lines that punish the singers mercilessly — punctuated by a few beautiful snatches of melody. The opera, performed without intermission, is less than two hours long, but its demands on the listener are intense.

To stage this daunting work, the Met found the perfect match for Shostakovich's sensibility in William Kentridge, the esteemed South African artist known for his collages and animated drawings.

Even before the opera begins, the audience is greeted by a giant collage in place of the curtain. It's teeming with a jumble of images, including political slogans and nonsense phrases in both English and Russian ("Another Kheppi Ending!" is one), street maps of St. Petersburg, a large red dot and pictures of historical figures.

Once the curtain goes up, the action takes place in movable sets that the characters sometimes drag on and off stage themselves. On a screen behind them plays a nonstop animated show, much of it featuring a grotesque oversize cartoon drawing of the missing nose, which at various times rides a horse that turns into a statue or appears superimposed over the heads of real figures from old newsreels and film footage.

One striking image occurs when Kovalyov finally gets his nose back but can't make it stick to his face. While he keeps trying, we see a dancer — with the nose where her head should be — gracefully executing dainty ballet steps.

One aspect of the staging does seem odd at first: There is no attempt to make Kovalyov appear as if his nose is really missing. After a while, however, it makes sense to have him look normal to the audience, since his problem is not so much a deformed appearance as embarrassment at how he thinks people will perceive him — thus his constant attempts to cover up his face with a handkerchief.

Throughout the evening, Kentridge's zany displays of visual imagination manage to enhance rather than distract from the score. No wonder the biggest cheers at the curtain call went to him and the rest of his design team.

Not that the musical side of things was undeserving. As Kovalyov, Brazilian baritone Paulo Szot — fresh from his Tony award-winning performance in "South Pacific" — made a splendid Met debut. He played his character's ridiculous plight with utter seriousness, riding an emotional roller coaster from disbelief to desperation to depression — only to emerge with swaggering self-satisfaction once he gets his nose back in its proper place. His singing was smooth and strong, except for a couple of times in the Kazan Cathedral scene where his moderate-size voice got swallowed up by the orchestra.

Of the more than 70 other solo parts, Andrei Popov deserves special mention for coping so well with the fiendishly high-lying role of the corrupt Police Inspector, who brings Kovalyov back his nose but insists on multiple bribes in exchange. Another debuting tenor, Gordon Gietz, gave sharp utterance to the few lines written for the Nose. Bass Gennady Bezzubenkov was excellent as the sadistic doctor, and soprano Erin Morley sang sweetly as Madame Podtochina's daughter, whose mother vainly hopes to marry her off to Kovalyov.

Valery Gergiev conducted the Met orchestra with a knowledge of the intricacies of this unique score that few if any living conductors could match.

IP: Logged

a
A-List Writer

Posts: 565
From:a
Registered: Aug 2001

posted March 22, 2010 09:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for a   Click Here to Email a     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wagner's Grandson Dies

* Article
* Comments

more in Business »

* Email
* Print
*

Save This ↓ More
*
o

facebook
facebook
o

Twitter
Twitter
o

Digg
Digg
o

StumbleUpon
StumbleUpon
o + More
close
o Yahoo! Buzz
o MySpace
o del.icio.us
o Reddit
o LinkedIn
o Fark
o Viadeo
o Orkut
* larger Text smaller

Associated Press

MUNICH — Wolfgang Wagner, the grandson of composer Richard Wagner and the leader of the Bayreuth opera festival for more than half a century, died on Sunday, the festival said in a brief statement on its Web site. He was 90.

"Wolfgang Wagner dedicated his whole life to the legacy of his grandfather," the festival said — adding that his long service as the event's leader means that he "goes into history as the longest-serving director in the world."

Mr. Wagner stepped down after the 2008 festival following a lengthy power struggle in which the patriarch long resisted efforts to dislodge him.

He had led the festival dedicated to his grandfather's works since 1951, first with his brother, Wieland, and then as the sole director — with a lifetime contract.

His insistence on serving out that contract led in his later years to clashes with officials who oversee the event — held every summer in the Bavarian town of Bayreuth in the small brick theater built by Richard Wagner in the 1870s.

It also triggered a spat within the Wagner family that itself was worthy of opera.

For years, Wolfgang Wagner insisted that only his second wife, Gudrun, could replace him, although German government officials and others overseeing the festival refused to accept her.

By the time Gudrun died in November 2007, Mr. Wagner was insisting that only the couple's daughter, Katharina, could fill his shoes — putting him at odds with two other Wagners who also sought the job.

Wolfgang finally agreed to step aside in 2008; Katharina and Wolfgang's long-estranged daughter from his first marriage, Eva Wagner-Pasquier, teamed up to beat out a rival bid from their cousin. They took charge last year.

Born on Aug. 30, 1919, in Bayreuth, Mr. Wagner studied the trumpet and French horn before being sent to fight on the eastern front early in World War II. In 1939, he was severely wounded and sent back to Berlin.

He first took charge of the festival — along with his brother, Wieland — in 1951, reviving the event that had been stopped by the war.

The pair worked to restore its tarnished name, with Wolfgang Wagner concentrating on organization and finances of the festival. He founded the "Society of Friends of Bayreuth" to accept donations and won government support.

Following Wieland's death from cancer in 1966, Wolfgang took over as sole director.

In addition to increasing the funding and establishing a separate foundation to oversee the composer's library, Wagner also invited directors from abroad to direct individual operas.

While many of the versions sparked controversy at the time, they were often groundbreaking interpretations of Richard Wagner's operas, in keeping with Wolfgang's idea of broadening their meaning by emphasizing their universal human context.

His own productions, including "Lohengrin" in 1953 and his second "Parsifal" in 1989, reflected this. Mr. Wagner remarked in 1957, that the "human, the Wagnerian being" was the most important element of his own productions.

The Wagner family's close connections to the Nazis and their ideology were a recurring theme during Wolfgang's tenure.

In 1997 his estranged son, Gottfried, published a book on the issue accusing his father of failing to renounce the virulent anti-Semitism of Wolfgang's mother, Winifred, a glowing admirer of Adolf Hitler who headed the Bayreuth festival under the Nazis in the 1930s. During her reign, Hitler not only helped fund the festival, but was allowed to meddle in artistic decisions.

Wolfgang Wagner denounced the book as "one-sided" and "primitive" and banned Gottfried — one of two children from his marriage to his first wife, Ellen — from the family home.

Its publication came at a time when Wagner was also under pressure from Wieland's daughter, Nike Wagner, who criticized what she called her uncle's "monarchic" leadership style.

In May 1999, Mr. Wagner himself initiated the process to find his replacement — but when the German government launched a public discussion over funding for the festival, the then 80-year-old director said he could not step down until the legal and financial future of the festival had been secured.

After several top artists refused to participate in the 2000 festival, festival board members named Ms. Wagner-Pasquier as the new director, but Mr. Wagner refused to step down, insisting on the life term in his contract. He held on to power for a further eight years.

Flags were lowered to half-staff at Bayreuth's city hall and public buildings decorated with black ribbons.

"With your father, Bayreuth and the entire opera world are losing one of their true greats," German President Horst Köhler wrote to Mr. Wagner's daughters.

"As festival director, he led Bayreuth to a height his predecessors could only dream of," he added. "His dry humor, his gift of self-irony and his unmistakable down-to-earthness helped him in that."

Bavarian Governor Horst Seehofer said "it is thanks particularly to Wolfgang Wagner that the Bayreuth festival is a hallmark of Bavaria and a magnet for visitors from around the world."

Mr. Wagner is survived by his three children. There was no immediate word on funeral arrangements.

IP: Logged


This topic is 7 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5  6  7 

All times are PT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | Manka Bros. Studios - Home

© 2012 Manka Bros. Studios - All Rights Reserved.

Powered by Infopop www.infopop.com © 2000
Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.45b